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Once scaffolding was installed, the crack under the left foot of the statue was inspected and it was determined that the cracked portions of the stone were stable, requiring filling to prevent water from collecting.
Loose corrosion products were removed from the bronze surfaces using water jets at low/medium pressure in the 1,000 to 1,500 psi range with 25 in. fan tips and rotating heads used.
Scaffolding was set up so all surfaces of the monument could easily be reached.
Cleaning tests of the different stones were made to determine the level of clean that could safely be achieved and not have the monument look "over-cleaned."
The general appearance of the Calhoun Monument was judged to be in relatively good condition except for active corrosion of the bronze sculpture, plaques, and decorative ornamentation. Active corrosion of the bronze was visible by its pale green appearance, streaking, and pitting of the surfaces.
On May 29, 2001 Conservation Solutions, Inc. of District Heights, Maryland, submitted its report to the City of Charleston Department of Parks about the condition of the monument and the treatment plan the company would follow.
The present statue of John C. Calhoun (1782-1850), one of South Carolina's most illustrious citizens, overlooks one of Charleston's busiest streets. For over one hundred years the Carolina statesman has faced the street that bears his name on Marion Square, formerly Citadel Square, between Meeting and King Streets.