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Public Relations Department
Charleston County Public Library
68 Calhoun Street
Charleston, SC 29401
843-805-6819 (phone)
843-727-3741 (fax)

Photos or videos may be taken at CCPL events and activities for library use in promotion and publicity. Anyone not wanting to have their photo taken should notify library staff at the time of the event or activity.

"To be a person is to have a story to tell." - Isak Dinesen
 
Past Festival highlights

We're on a roll. The fourth annual Charleston Tells Storytelling Festival in 2016 again drew rave reviews and surpassed all expectations. Attracting local residents and visitors from throughout the Southeast, the Festival showed off some of the very best in storytelling with international and national performers like Bill Harley, Barbara McBride-Smith, Connie Regan-Blake and Oba William King - each one a showstopper. The Festival also showed off some of the best regional and local tellers . These gifted performers left audiences wowed and wanting more. 
     

 Check out these numbers: 
2016: 
  • More than 1,700 people attended Charleston Tells-sponsored events
  • 40+ storytelling and musical performances offered during the 2016 Festival weekend
  • Students at two local schools and retirement home residents were entertained during performances by featured national storytellers 
  • Workshop participants learned how to boost non-profit organizations with storytelling.
  • Accomplished and novice storytellers swapped stories under the oaks
2015:
  • More than 1,700 people attended Charleston Tells-sponsored events
  • 40+ storytelling and musical performances offered during the 2015 Festival weekend
  • Students at three area schools were entertained with performances by guest national tellers
  • Premiered storytelling workshop: Your Family Stories Need to be Told
  • Shared digital storytelling videos produced as a result of year-long 'I Want to Tell You' storytelling grant
  • Accomplished and novice storytellers swapped stories under the oaks
2014:
  • More than 1,600 people attended Charleston Tells-sponsored events
  • 40+ storytelling and musical performances offered during the 2014 Festival weekend
  • 750+ students at five area schools were entertained with performances by guest national tellers
  • Accomplished and novice tellers spun tales during a special Story Swap Under The Oaks
 2013:
  • More than 1,700 people attended inaugural Charleston Tells-sponsored events
  • 40+ storytelling and musical performances offered during the 2013 Festival weekend
  • 600+ students at three area schools were entertained with performances by guest national tellers
  • 25% of Festival attendees were from outside Charleston County
 Check out these Festival reviews:
"It was absolutely grand. 
What a wonderful day."
 
"Excellent.
Far exceeded my expectations."

- 2014 Festival attendees

Donald Davis
"It was awesome."
 
 
"The storytellers and the atmosphere (were highlights). 
Big kudos to everyone at CCPL."

- 2014 Festival attendees
"An exceptional experience."
 

"Inspiring and educational (with)
thought-provoking performances."
 
- 2014 Festival attendees 
 
Chetter Galloway
 
Carolyn White
 
Hector Qirko's Imaginary Band
"My wife and I, along with three friends from Columbia, attended the festival, and it was wonderful ... We will put it on the calendar for next year." 

- 2013 Festival attendees 
 
Diane Ferlatte
 
Syd Lieberman

 "Wonderful city. Wonderful food. Wonderful festival. Wonderful tellers. Wonderful audiences. Wonderful people organizing everything and taking care of us. And, I'm not kidding!!!"

- Syd Lieberman, 2013 featured national storyteller, author and recording artist  

 

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Bestselling author appearance Sunday
 
Bestselling Author Elin Hilderbrand presents Summerland 

Date/Time: 
Sunday, May 5 at 3 p.m.

Location:
Charleston County Main Library 
68 Calhoun Street


New York Times bestselling author Elin Hilderbrand, known as "queen of the summer novel," will talk about her latest book Sunday, May 5 at 3 p.m. at the Charleston County Main Library.

With multiple bestsellers and more than a million books sold, Hilderbrand is known for her summer romance novels filled with drama, emotion love and adventure.

Her recent novel, Summerland, is now available in paperback. She will answer questions and sign autographs after the presentation, and copies of Summerland will be available for sale.

Summerland is inspired by a true story involving a string of suicides affecting the Nantucket community. It explores the darkest, most fragile moments of the heart as a community pulls together to cope with losing and trying to protect its vulnerable teenagers.

Hilderbrand lives on Nantucket with her husband and three young children.

 


8/29 program features Sandy Hook responder
St. Andrews delays Tuesday opening for event

The St. Andrews Regional Library will open at 10:30 a.m. Tuesday, June 21, 30 minutes later than usual, to accommodate a special event renaming of and dedicating the branch to Cynthia Graham Hurd. 

Click here for event details.  


"To be a person is to have a story to tell." - Isak Dinesen
 SPONSORS

Charleston Tells thanks these generous sponsors 
for helping to make this concert series possible:


Lowcountry Quarterly Arts

Cynthia Bledsoe and Michael Kaynard


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About Veronica Roth

At 22, Veronica Roth started her first book during a creative writing program at Northwestern University. 

Her completed novel, Divergent, drew whirlwind attention from the publishing world. Four days after Roth sent the manuscript, HarperCollins signed the student to a publishing deal. Divergent was soon climbing the New York Times bestseller list, drawing rave reviews from fans and critics and rocketing Roth to literary stardom.

Publishers Weekly called it a "memorable, unpredictable journey from which it is nearly impossible to turn away," and Kirkus Reviews said "fans snared by the ratcheting
suspense will be unable to resist speculating on their own factional allegiance."

Released in 2011 as the first novel in a trilogy, Divergent often is compared to The Hunger Games phenomenon. Now available in 37 languages, Divergent is gaining worldwide popularity.

Being adapted into a major motion picture, the Divergent story will hit theaters March 2014 with actress Shailene Woodley in the lead role.

The second book in the trilogy, Insurgent, had readers waiting with anticipation when it was released in May 2012. Excitement is bubbling again for the third and final installment, Allegiant, set for release October 22.

Set in a futuristic society divided into five factions with different virtues and beliefs, the book's characters must choose which faction to join. Asked which faction best matches her character, Roth said she would choose Dauntless, The Brave. She thinks courage empowers people to act for the good of others, regardless of the consequences.

Now a full-time writer, Roth lives near Chicago with her husband. Roth enjoys cooking and studying biology, theology, fashion, contemporary art and poetry, among other things.

 

back

Entry Form

All entries must include this signed Entry Form plus the signed Release Form.
Details about the contest and three-day workshop are available on the library's website at www.ccpl.org. It is the entrant's responsibility to read and adhere to all details outlined in the Contest Rules and Submission Guidelines. All submissions must be postmarked by December 31, 2014.

  1. Create your entry (either as a short video or written essay) answering the questions presented in the Contest Rules.
  2. Title your submission with CCPL Contest-What I Want You to Know. 
  3. Include the contest name, your name, your project's name and your contact information on your entry forms, all pages of any written essays and in the opening of your video. 
  4. If submitting a video, you may upload the entry to YouTube and provide the link on your entry form or send a DVD with your entry.

If you choose to submit your entry via email:

  1. Print, fill out and sign both the Contest Entry Form and Contest Release Form.
  2. Scan or photograph the completed forms so they can be sent electronically.
  3. Send your entry (either with a link to your video or a .pdf or Microsoft Word version of your essay) plus the two forms to whatiwantyoutoknow@ccpl.org.

If you choose to submit your entry by mail:

  1. Print, fill out and sign both the Contest Entry Form and Contest Release Form.
  2. Send your entry (either with a link or a DVD of your video OR a .pdf or Microsoft Word version of your essay) plus the two forms to: 
What I Want You to Know Workshop Contest
Attn: Kimberly Bowlin
Charleston County Public Library
68 Calhoun Street
Charleston, SC 29401.

Entry Form
Name: ____________________________________________________________________________________________________

Address: __________________________________________________________________________________________________

Email:
_______________________________________________________

Phone Number:

_______________________________

Type of submission:
___ Video Video Title ___________________________________________________________________________
Select: ___ Uploaded to YouTube - URL _________________________________________________________
___ Mailed in DVD
If video uses audio in the public domain, list source: ___________________________________________

___ Essay Essay Title ___________________________________________________________________________
Select: ___ Emailed ___ Mailed


NEED TO FIX THIS SECTION .............
If any individuals are portrayed in
Parental Consent (if 13-17 years old) -
Name of Parent/Legal Guardian:
Name of child:
Parent's phone number:
Parent's email address:

 

 

Gullah Geechee artist workshop
Interested in learning more about Divergent? Check out the links below.
Check out cool behind-the-scenes photos and information on the official Divergent series site, featuring updates on the film adaptation, interviews with Veronica Roth and fun contests for fans to win Divergent prizes.
   

Learn more about author Veronica Roth. 
Check out  her official blog or follow
@veronicaroth on Twitter.

Media interviews with Veronica Roth. 

   
Are you Abnegation, Amity, Candor, Dauntless, Erudite...or Divergent? Take a faction quiz, and find out where you belong.

Check out these unofficial Divergent fan sites: 
Divergent book reviews
Dystopian literature resources
Dystopian film resources
Divergent movie trailers  
     
 
Interviews with Divergent cast members
 YALLFest

YALLFest, the South's premier young adult book festival, kicks off with a program featuring two of the country's most popular novelists - Veronica Roth, author of Divergent, and Rae Carson, author of The Girl of Fire and Thorns.

YALLFest brings 50 of the nation's best young adult writers to Charleston for a day of interactive panels, book signings, contests and more. 



"To be a person is to have a story to tell." - Isak Dinesen
 
Check out the national tellers previously featured at Charleston Tells:
 2015  
Charlotte Blake Alston  

Charlotte Blake Alston is a storyteller, narrator, instrumentalist and singer who breathes life into traditional and contemporary stories from African and African-American history. In this electronic age, Alston uses stories to engage the imagination, underscore human commonalities and reiterate life lessons gained from centuries of human experience. Her melodic voice mesmerizes audiences, and she incorporates traditional instruments into performances. Alston is a recipient of the Pew Fellowship in the Arts, the "Circle of Excellence" Award from the National Storytelling Association and the Zora Neale Hurston Award, the highest award bestowed by the National Association of Black Storytellers. 

Visit Charlotte's website

   
Michael Reno Harrell  

Michael Reno Harrell is an award-winning songwriter and storyteller from the southern Appalachian Mountains whose recordings top the American Music Association charts year after year. Known for original songs and stories described as "Appalachian grit and wit," Harrell has earned praise from music, literary and storytelling communities both nationally and abroad. A featured teller at the National Storytelling Festival, a Teller in Residence at the International Storytelling Center and a featured performer at MerleFest and the Walnut Valley Festival, Harrell's stories have been likened to a grandfather's pocket knife: well-worn and familiar-feeling, while razor sharp and with a point.

Visit Michael's website

   
Bil Lepp  

Bil Lepp became adept at spinning tales and exaggerating circumstances at an early age. A nationally renowned storyteller and five-time champion of the West Virginia Liars Contest, Lepp's outrageously humorous tall-tales and witty stories have earned the appreciation of listeners of all ages and from all walks of life. Lepp has been featured 13 times at the National Storytelling Festival, performed at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival and at Comedy Central's Stage in Los Angeles. The author of three books of tall tales, 10 audio collections, a non-fiction book and a novel, Lepp received the National Storytelling Network's Circle of Excellence Award in 2011. 

Visit Bil's website

   
Corinne Stavish   

Corinne Stavish credits her father with instilling in her a love of justice, a passion for history, a wicked sense of humor and a drive to share stories. She uses her degrees in theatre, literature and performing arts to great advantage as she shapes personal and public history into powerful narratives. Stavish's life experiences in New York, Oklahoma, Illinois and Michigan introduced her to a variety of characters with recognizable accents and situations that populate her stories. Featured at the National Storytelling Festival and the 2005 Nationally Storytelling Conference, Stavish sits on the Board of Governors for the International Storytelling Center and is a humanities professor at Lawrence Technological University. 

Visit Corinne's website

   
   
   
   
   
  

Check out the regional tellers previously featured at Charleston Tells:

 Adam Booth  
Adam Booth is an award-winning storyteller from a family tree with Appalachian and Jewish storytelling roots that are generations deep. A four-time champion of the West Virginia Liars Contest and winner of storytelling competitions in three states, Booth shares captivating family narratives, original tall tales, traditional Appalachian stories and new works created in the style of traditional Appalachian folklore. 

Visit Adam's website
   
Sharon Cooper-Murray    
Known as "the Gullah Lady," Sharon Cooper-Murray's affinity for the indigenous Lowcountry culture is manifested through the tales she tells. After hearing the Creole language for the first time during a post-college trip to Wadmalaw Island, Sharon devoted herself to decades of preserving, conserving and developing the Gullah way of life through language, music, arts and crafts.
   
 Veronica Gaillard  
  Veronica Gaillard is a Charleston native known for her animated Gullah performances that feature her natural flair and charisma. A former drama instructor, she is artist-in-residence for the Weed and Seed North Charleston Cultural Arts Program and the Storefront School of the Arts at the Septima Clark/Housing Authority.
   
 Julian Gooding  
  Storyteller, documentary filmmaker and percussionist Julian Gooding uses drumming and oral traditions of West Africa to open and engage the creative mind and spirit of a child. His interactive storytelling style encourages both children and adults to take part in each story and become the characters or create mood and imagery with props and world percussion.  
   
Aunt Pearlie Sue  
Aunt Pearlie Sue has entertained audiences with Gullah-flavored folktales for more than 10 years. Portrayed by Anita Singleton-Prather, she created the Aunt Pearlie Sue character in honor of her grandmother. In addition to being a storyteller, Singleton-Prather is an educator, singer, actress and historian. She has performed at numerous festivals, including Spoleto Festival USA, and has appeared in Forrest Gump and on Christmas Across America on the Food Network Channel. A native of the Sea Islands in Beaufort County, Singleton-Prather is a founder and performer with the Gullah Kinfolk musical group. She uses her heritage to creatively entertain and educate audiences of all ages about the African experience in America. 

Visit Aunt Pearlie Sue's website
   
 

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Learn about factions of Charleston

Factions of Charleston
Thursday, October 10 at 6:30 p.m.

Main Library, Meeting Room B - 68 Calhoun Street, downtown: 805-6930

From wealthy plantation owners to shopkeepers and field laborers, antebellum Charleston had distinct social and economic classes. Take a step back in time, and learn how these groups coexisted in this presentation by Marianne Cawley, manager of the library's S.C. History Room. Call 805-6956 for information.

This year's One Book Charleston County selection is Divergent by Veronica Roth, a critically acclaimed and huge bestseller about a futuristic society where residents are separated into one of five distinct groups, or factions based on their beliefs and talents. The goal of One Book is to unite local residents to read, attend events and discuss the core issues in a single book. The library is hosting Divergent-themed events through November 8. For a full list of activities and times, stop by your local library to pick up the One Book Charleston County guide.

As of July 31, the following titles are nominated for inclusion within the 2018 compilation of best fiction recommendations for young adults across the country. Click a title listed below to view available formats, place a hold or locate a copy at a CCPL branch near you. Additional nominees will be added each month, so stay tuned for updates!    

After the Fall by Kate Hart (2017)
Raychel has been part of the Richardsons' lives since she was young, but as teenagers the relationships between Raychel, Matt, and Andrew have changed. When Raychel is the victim of a rumor cycle, the boys protect her. After tragedy strikes, all must let go of first loves and move on.

Alex and Eliza: A Love Story by Melissa de la Cruz (2017)
It's the height of the American Revolution. Alexander Hamilton, Washington's right-hand man, and Elizabeth Schuyler, a member of a prominent family, fall in love despite a rocky first meeting. However, Eliza is expected to marry a man of equal regard. Alex, an orphan, is not suitable. Will they find happiness?

Alex, Approximately by Jenn Bennett (2017)
When Bailey moves to California to live with her dad, she looks forward tracking down the boy she's developed an online friendship with in a classic movie forum. But her search for "Alex" gets sidetracked by annoying surfer-boy and coworker Porter. "You've Got Mail" gets a modern and refreshing makeover.

Allegedly by Tiffany D. Jackson (2017) 
16-year-old Mary Addison has spent 7 years in the juvenile justice system for allegedly killing a white baby, but now that she's pregnant with a baby of her own, she's ready to tell the truth about what really happened that night.

All in Pieces by Suzanne Young (2016)
After stabbing her ex-boyfriend's hand with a pencil, Savannah is sent to an alternative high school for anger management. An alcoholic father means that Savannah is the primary caretaker for her younger disabled brother. Can she meet Evan's needs and still find her own happiness?

Always and Forever, Lara Jean by Jenny Han (2017)
High school senior Lara Jean has much to look forward to: attending prom with her lacrosse boyfriend, getting into her first choice college, planning her father's wedding, and finding the perfect chocolate chip cookie recipe. When things don't go according to plan, Lara Jean must make some difficult decisions.

American Street by Ibi Zoboi (2017)
Fabiola Toussaint, an American born citizen raised in Haiti, tries to immigrate back to the United States from Haiti with her mother to live with her Aunt Jo and three cousins in Detroit. When her mother is detained at the airport, Fabiola must learn how to adapt to American living.

Bad Blood by Demitria Lunetta (2017)
Heather, on a summer trip to Scotland, realizes the design she has been cutting into her own flesh is a Celtic symbol. Learning her ancestors dabbled in blood magic, Heather wonders if there's a deeper reason that she cuts. Are seventeenth-century twins reaching out to her?

Bang by Barry Lyga (2017)
At four years old, Sebastian accidentally shot and killed his infant sister. Now, ten years later, he is still dealing with guilt and learning how to cope.

Beast by Brie Spangler (2016)
Insecure about his unusually large and hairy appearance, 15-year-old Dylan feels like a freak until he meets brave and beautiful Jamie, who accepts and loves him as he is. But when he realizes she is transgender, can he return the favor?

Behind Closed Doors by Miriam Halahmy (2017)
Josie's mother is a hoarder. Tasha's mother's boyfriend keeps trying to sneak into her bedroom. Both girls are guarding these secrets. But things are changing and they will need one another's help.

Blood Rose Rebellion by Rosalyn Eves (2017)
Unable to use magic properly, Anna is exiled from society to Hungary. But when she's there, she discovers sinister plots involving her family. She must decide her destiny, and her decision could change the world.

Bull by David Elliott (2017)
The myth of Theseus and the Minotaur is given a modern spin in this darkly humorous novel in verse. Minos' thirst for power gets him into trouble with Poseidon. It's Pasiphae, Minos' wife, who pays the price, birthing a son who is half man and half bull.

Caraval by Stephanie Garber (2017)
Scarlet and her sister Tella live with their abusive father on a small island. When invitations to attend the unique Caraval party arrive just prior to Scarlet's wedding, things seem hopeful. But nothing is as it appears at this magical party.

City of Saints & Thieves by Natalie C. Anderson (2017)
Tina lives on the streets of Kenya and becomes part of a gang to survive. She desperately wants revenge on the man she believes killed her mother. But much of the family's past is shrouded in mystery. Will Tina find justice?

Crazy Messy Beautiful by Carrie Arcos (2017)
Neruda Diaz is an artist and believes in soulmates in spite of being unlucky in love. When he's paired with white Callie Leibowitz for a school project, he hopes that has changed. His unfaithful father and a ex-con friend help him come to terms with the complications of love.

Daughter of the Pirate King by Tricia Levenseller (2017)
Alosa is on a mission to find a lost treasure map for her father, the legendary pirate king. She orchestrates her own kidnapping and ingeniously acts the helpless victim to ensure her stay on a rival pirate ship. Now she must quickly find the map and plan her escape before the Captain discovers what she truly is.

Defy the Stars by Claudia Gray (2017)
Noemi is a 17 year old soldier defending her planet, Genesis, against Earth. Abel is a robot programmed to fight Genesis for Earth and protect his creator. They are sworn enemies who end up trying to survive together- and, perhaps, to find a way to end the war.

Devil's Advocate by Jonathan Maberry (2017)
Relocated to Maryland for her father's military career, Dana Scully must adjust to a new high school. On her first day of class, she wakes from a horrific dream that is later followed by an on-campus vision of a recently-killed classmate. Can the teen discover the sinister forces at work?

The Diabolic by S.J. Kincaid (2016)
Nemesis is a Diabolic, an engineered human, created to be the deadly guardian for Sidonia, the daughter of an important galactic family. When Nemesis impersonates Sidonia at the court of the emperor, she becomes involved in a deadly game of intrigue and learns about her developing sense of humanity.

Dreamland Burning by Jennifer Latham (2017)
The discovery of human remains on Rowan's family's property triggers a murder mystery investigation, and in alternating chapters, tells the story of the Oklahoma Race Riot of 1921.

The Education of Margot Sanchez by Lilliam Rivera (2017)
Margot Sanchez spends her first year at Somerset Preparatory School crafting a new persona to ingratiate herself with classmates, mimicking their fashion style and their critical and supercilious attitudes towards others. After misusing her father's credit card, she must repay the debt by working all summer in the family supermarket. 

Eliza and Her Monsters by Francesca Zappia (2017)
Fellow students don't know that when she's not at school, reclusive senior Eliza is LadyConstellation, creator of the wildly popular Monstrous Sea. New student Wallace is a huge fan of the webcomic, and slowly breaks through her shell. However, trying to keep her two lives separate may cost Eliza everything.

Empress of a Thousand Skies by Rhoda Belleza (2017)
Rhiannon, the last princess, is traveling to her coronation when someone attempts to assassinate her. In an environment of deception and betrayal, it's hard to differentiate allies and enemies. Rhee must discover who wants her dead, claim the throne, and prevent interplanetary war.

Everything Beautiful Is Not Ruined by Danielle Younge-Ullman (2017)
Ingrid's life is turned upside-down when her internationally-lauded, brilliant opera-star mother's career suddenly and disastrously ends. Leaving Europe to return to the inherited family home in Canada, both she and her mother struggle to adapt to their changed lifestyle and its accompanying emotional distress.

Fire Color One by Jenny Valentine (2017)
Although her rich, art-loving father has been absent for most of her life, sixteen-year-old arsonist Iris spends time with him during his final living days and hears a different story than the one told to her by her manipulative and money-hungry mother. 

Flame in the Mist by Renee Ahdieh (2017)
Mariko, betrothed to the Emperor's son, is attacked on her way to the palace. To survive, she disguises herself as a man to find those responsible for her attempted murder. However, seeking answers while traveling with the Black Clan could lead to her death if they learn her identity.

Flying Lessons & other stories edited by Ellen Oh (2017)
Ten popular YA authors offer their own spin on growing up in this engaging and diverse collection. Middle school and high school students will appreciate the humor and authenticity of each story and will relish the introductions to the featured authors.

Frogkisser! by Garth Nix (2017)
Princess Anya's Quest to return one of her sister's suitors to his human form and defeat her evil step-step father grows to monumental proportions, eventually involving all sorts of magical creatures and humans across a multitude of kingdoms.

The Go-Between by Veronica Chambers (2017)
Cammi's famous mother finds herself in a tabloid scandal, leading the family to take a hiatus in L.A. where Cammi is taken for a scholarship student at her private school because she's Mexican. She goes along with this story as a social experiment, but digs herself deep into her lie.

Goodbye Days by Jeff Zentner (2017)
Carver's three best friends are killed in a car accident soon after he sends the driver a text message. Grief and guilt take their toll. When the grandmother of one of his deceased friends asks for a "goodbye day," Carver agrees, hoping for closure.

Grendel's Guide to Love and War by A. E. Kaplan (2017)
An introspective teen who takes an interest in recording the stories of his elderly neighbors enters a pranking war with the partying teenagers next door, partly to protect his father who suffers from PTSD in this clever Beowulf adaptation.

The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas (2017)
Starr Carter is a black girl caught between two worlds: her poor, black neighborhood, and her suburban, mostly white high school. Occupying this liminal space becomes nearly impossible when Starr witnesses, and is forced to speak out about, the fatal shooting of her unarmed friend, Khalil, by a white cop.

The Hidden Memory of Objects by Danielle Mages Amato (2017)
When fifteen-year-old Megan learns that police attribute her brother's unexpected death to a drug overdose, she refuses to accept this characterization. Megan begins an investigation to find the truth, quickly finding herself caught up in a world of blood artifacts, paranormal abilities and political intrigue.

How to Make a Wish by Ashley Blake (2017)
Grace is a 17-year-old pianist who has spent most of her life taking care of her mother, Maggie. Eva is an accomplished dancer who moves to Grace's seaside town after her mother passes away. As romance ensues, the two learn to confront grief, embrace happiness, and make decisions for themselves. 

The Gentleman's Guide to Vice and Virtue by Mackenzi Lee (2017)
Henry Montague, the son of a British nobleman, embarks on a European tour with his best friend (and secret crush) Percy and his sister Felicity. Along the way, they encounter adventure and conflict that leads them to a very different destiny than the one awaiting their return to England.

The Inexplicable Logic of My Life by Benjamin Alire Sàenz (2017)
High school senior Sal has a lot on his plate as he deals with his dying grandmother, tries to control his growing anger with the prejudice of others, and ponders his relationship with his adopted father in this diverse novel about friendship and what it takes to become a man.

Letters to the Lost by Brigid Kemmerer (2017)
Juliet and Declan begin writing letters, and later emails, anonymously after one exchange at the gravesite of Juliet's mom. Soon they share personal struggles, but still as strangers. When they realize their worst moments may be connected, the friendship could be over.

A List of Cages by Robin Roe (2017)
After Julian's parents die in an accident, he moves from a loving foster home to live with his abusive Uncle Russell. Five years later, Adam, a well-liked older classmate with ADHD, provides his former foster brother Julian with an important friendship at a critical time.

Loving vs. Virginia: A Documentary Novel of the Landmark Civil Rights Case by Patricia Hruby Powell. Illustrated by Shadra Strickland (2017)
This accessible novel-in-verse brings readers into the lives of Richard and Mabel (Jeter) Loving, an interracial couple who married in 1958 despite Virginia's anti-miscegenation laws, and whose determination to be a family resulted in the landmark Civil Rights decision from the Supreme Court.

Maid of the King's Court by Lucy Worsley (2017)
The daughter of politically disgraced royalty in financial straits, Eliza understands her duty to rescue her family through marriage to a man of wealth and title. When arranged marriage plans end in disaster, Eliza's only remaining option is to be groomed as a maid-of-honor in King Henry VIII's court.

Midnight at the Electric by Jodi Lynn Anderson (2017)
Just before Adri leaves Earth to become one of the first human inhabitants of Mars, she finds a journal and a series of letters that spark her curiosity about her past. Told across multiple generations, Midnight at the Electric explores the moments that define our lives and connect us.

The Murderer's Ape by Jakob Wegelius (2017) 
Despite being a gorilla, Sally Jones is an excellent typist and she uses her typewriter to tell the adventure of her attempts to exonerate best friend and sailor Henry Koskela, who was wrongfully imprisoned for murder after the two of them were caught in the middle of a smuggling operation.

The Names They Gave Us by Emery Lord (2017) 
Bible camp was always Lucy's plan for the summer. But when her mom asks her to serve instead as a counselor at a camp for youth who have experienced trauma, Lucy's plan is thrown off course as she learns to adjust to new possibilities-both exciting and terrifying.

One of Us is Lying by Karen McManus (2017) 
Five high school students end up in detention after being caught with their phones out during class. Five students go in, but only four come out alive. All have secrets they didn't want Simon to reveal on his high school gossip app. Which student is the killer?

Optimists Die First by Susin Nielsen (2017)
Petula sees danger in everything since the death of her little sister. In therapy group, she meets Jacob, outgoing despite an accident in which he lost a limb. As she slowly opens herself to hope, she learns Jacob's been keeping secrets-was she right all along to expect the worst?

Overturned by Lamar Giles (2017)
Nikki Tate's plans to escape the Vegas life by winning illegal card tournaments comes to a sudden stop when her father, a small-time casino owner, is murdered shortly after being released from jail for a homicide he did not commit.

Piecing Me Together by Renee Watson (2017)
Artist Jade has big dreams, but recognizes that coming from a rough neighborhood creates barriers. She reluctantly joins Woman to Woman, a mentoring program that promises a scholarship. Her well-intentioned mentor, also black, doesn't understand Jade has no desire to be "saved." Each has things to learn from the other.

Poison's Kiss by Breeana Shields (2017)
Marinda is a "poison maiden" whose kiss kills the Raja's enemies. When her next target is the boy she loves, she decides to try to save him, her little brother, and herself from her handlers and powers of the supernatural.

Radio Silence by Alice Oseman (2017)
To the outside world, Frances is a shy, boring nerd who hopes to attend Cambridge University. In reality, she is a quirky bisexual artist who loves listening to and drawing fan art for Universe City, a mysterious podcast whose agender narrator goes by the name of Radio Silence.

Ramona Blue by Julie Murphy (2017)
Ramona thinks she knows exactly who she is, who she loves, and what her future holds, until her senior year of high school challenges her expectations and she learns that life, love, and identity are more fluid than she thought.

Refugee by Alan Gratz (2017)
Josef (a Jewish boy in 1939), Isabel (a Cuban in 1994), and Mahmoud (a Syrian in 2015) flee their homes seeking safety. Readers will come to care deeply for each protagonist, recognizing the similarities in each of these different political periods and the universal face of courage.

Saint Death by Marcus Sedgwick (2017)
In Juarez, the childhood friend Arturo hasn't seen for a year comes begging for help to transport his girlfriend and infant across the Mexican border into North America. The game of calavera Arturo plays to win freedom for his friends draws him into the merciless vortex of cartels and drug-trafficking.

A Season of Daring Greatly by Ellen Emerson White (2017)
Jill Cafferty is the first female pitcher in MLB history. During her initial short season with the Pittsburgh Pirates' minor league team, she feels enormous pressure to perform while facing sexism on and off the field, and loneliness from leaving right after her high school graduation.

The Shadow Cipher by Laura Ruby (2017)
In an alternate present-day New York City, twins Tess and Theo Beidermann and their friend Jamie Cruz race to save their home from destruction. Can they solve the Old York Cipher, a mystery left behind by the Morningstar twins, geniuses whose city design was unrivaled in its technology and advancements?

Strange the Dreamer by Laini Taylor (2017)
Lazlo Strange is an orphan raised by monks. He dedicated his life to learning and his favorite story is of Weep, the lost fairytale city that was literally removed from memory. This is the story of his search for the magical city.

A Tragic Kind of Wonderful by Eric Lindstrom (2017)
Life for sixteen-year-old Mel Hannigan isn't easy. As she tries to hide her bipolar disorder and grieve the loss of her older brother, it costs her old friends and threatens to affect new relationships. How will those closest to Mel react when they discover the extent of her secrets?

The Unbeatable Squirrel Girl: Squirrel Meets World by Shannon Hale and Dean Hale (2017)
Doreen is not your average teen. Sure, she worries about math homework and making friends, but she's got bigger problems too. Doreen must save the town using her assets-her luxurious squirrel tale and super squirrel strength. Can she use her squirrel super powers to defeat the evil Micro-Manager?

The Upside of Unrequited by Becky Albertalli (2017)
17-year-old Molly has 26 crushes behind her, but has never acted on them. Her outgoing twin, Cassie, thinks she's got the perfect guy for Molly, but Molly's finding herself more drawn to a nerdy coworker. Can Molly overcome her insecurities and finally take a chance?

We Are Okay by Nina LaCour (2017)
Marin has isolated herself in icy New York over winter break rather than confronting the devastating memories she ran from in San Francisco. But when her best friend flies cross-country to be with her, Marin discovers that the only way to move beyond grief is to face it head-on.

Who Killed Christopher Goodman? by Allan Wolf (2017)
Several high school students tell the story of classmate Christopher Goodman's murder -- including the person who killed him. Set in 1979, this novel is based on a true crime from the author's childhood.

Wonderful Feels Like This by Sara Lövestam  (2017)
Steffi, bullied at school, finds solace in jazz music and in a new friendship with a retired man and former jazz musician who coaches her through learning a new instrument and tells her about his own teenage years as a musician in Sweden during WWII.

Words in Deep Blue by Cath Crowley (2017)
Rachel and Henry were best friends until Rachel moved away. After her brother's death, Rachel's world is in shambles. She returns to their home town to work in Henry's family bookshop, where Henry faces his own struggles. An exceptional coming of age exploration and ode to the power of words.
 
 One Book Charleston County Events

  Friday, November 8 from 4-5:30 p.m.
YALLFest Preview VIP event 
Main Library Teen Lounge 
68 Calhoun Street, downtown: 805-6930
Sponsored by Amity.
Meet bestselling authors Lauren Oliver, 
Melissa de la Cruz, Michael Johnston, 
Michelle Hodkin, Carrie Ryan, Veronica Rossi and Alexandra Bracken and learn about trends in young adult literature, including the growing interest in dystopian cultures. In Charleston to participate in YALLFest, the authors will be available to answer questions and sign books. All ages are welcome. Students in grades 6-12 will get priority seating. Space is limited. Call 805-6903 to register.

Saturday, November 9 at 10 a.m.
YALLFest Keynote Conversation with Veronica Roth and Rae Carson
Charleston Music Hall - 37 John Street, downtown
Sponsored by Amity.
YALLFest, the South's premier young adult book festival, kicks off with a program featuring two of the country's most popular novelists - Veronica Roth, author of Divergent, and Rae Carson, author of The Girl of Fire and Thorns. YALLFest brings 50 of the nation's best young adult writers to Charleston for a day of interactive panels, book signings, contests and more. Keynote tickets are $7 each. For information on the festival and purchasing tickets, visit www.yallfest.org. Presented by Epic Reads and Harper Teen. 
   


  back

 

"To be a person is to have a story to tell." - Isak Dinesen
 

2017 CHARLESTON TELLS CONCERT SERIES TICKETS
GROUP SALES PAGE

A discounted ticket rate is available for groups of five or more. 
Tickets will be available to purchase at the door for $12. 
 

An Evening with Kate Campbell 
Friday, Aug. 25 from 7-8:30 p.m. 
at Main Library


 

For questions concerning group ticket purchases, please email charlestontells@ccpl.org





Back to the Charleston Tells Main Page

 

 

Opera at the Library
Join us for operas on film  free!

 
    
Macbeth by Verdi 
November 1 at 1 p.m.

Approximate running time: 3 hours, 13 minutes
Star soprano Anna Netrebko delivers her searing portrayal of Lady Macbeth, the mad and murderous mate of Željko Lučić's doomed Macbeth, for the first time at the Met. Adrian Noble's chilling production of Verdi's masterful adaptation of Shakespeare's tragedy also stars Joseph Calleja as the noble Macduff and René Pape as Banquo. Fabio Luisi conducts.
   

Le Nozze di Figaro by Mozart
November 15 at 1 p.m.

Approximate running time: 3 hours, 52 minutes.
Met Music Director James Levine conducts a spirited new production of Mozart's masterpiece, directed by Richard Eyre, who sets the action of this classic domestic comedy in a 19th-century manor house in Seville, but during the gilded age of the late 1920s. Dashing bass-baritone Ildar Abdrazakov leads the cast in the title role of the clever servant, opposite Marlis Petersen as his bride, Susanna, Peter Mattei as the philandering Count they work for, Marina Poplavskaya as the long-suffering Countess, and Isabel Leonard as the libidinous pageboy Cherubino.

   
Carmen by Bizet
December 13 at 1 p.m. 

Approximate running time: 3 hours, 38 minutes
Richard Eyre's mesmerizing production of Bizet's steamy melodrama returns with mezzo-soprano Anita Rachvelishvili singing her signature role of the ill-fated gypsy temptress. Aleksandrs Antonenko plays her desperate lover, the soldier Don José, and Ildar Abdrazakov is the swaggering bullfighter, Escamillo, who comes between them. Pablo Heras-Casado conducts the irresistible score, which features one beloved and instantly recognizable melody after another.
   
   

A library card is the coolest card –
September is Library Card Sign-up Month 

 

Studies show that children who are read to in the home and who use the library perform better in school. September is Library Card Sign-up Month, a time when CCPL joins the American Library Association and public libraries nationwide to make sure that every student has the most important school supply of all – a free library card.   

Smartest Card Image

Resources at CCPL are available to anyone who has a library card. Students can turn to the library for materials, programs and knowledgeable library staff that support academic achievement. In addition to checking out books, DVDs and CDs, a library card provides free access to thousands of downloadable eBooks, audio books, training courses, eMagazines, music and music videos. It’s also a gateway to dozens of free, online databases that offer language learning tools, resume writing tips, investment advice and information about family genealogy. 

Today’s libraries aren’t only a place of quiet study, they also are creative and engaging community centers where students can collaborate, use new technologies or just relax with peers.  


“Our library provides access and programs for students of all ages,” says Cynthia Bledsoe, CCPL’s Acting Executive Director. “For preschool age children we offer early literacy Babygarten and preschool storytimes to encourage school readiness; for older children and teens we supplement education with hands-on science, technology, engineering, arts and math (STEAM) programs; and for older teens we have information and tools to help prepare for college and mentoring programs. There’s really something for everyone, and it’s all free with a library card.”

 

 

"To be a person is to have a story to tell." - Isak Dinesen
 

2017 CHARLESTON TELLS CONCERT SERIES TICKETS

Purchase tickets online for $10 through Aug. 24.
Tickets will also be available to purchase at the door for $12,
and Charleston Friends of the Library will sell beer and wine at the concert. 
 
 

An Evening with Kate Campbell
Friday, August 25 from 7-8:30 p.m.
at Main Library



Available group rates:
Groups of five or more may purchase tickets at a discounted rate of $8 each through August 24. 
For assistance with group ticket purchases,
please 
email charlestontells@ccpl.org.


*Please note that tickets purchased online will not be mailed to you.* Please print your receipt from PayPal or the receipt emailed to you, and bring it to the concert.


 

Films 
 
 

 eBooks



 
 

Audio Books

     
 

One Click Digital logo

Learn more or
access now. 

 eMagazines
 

Use your library card to read digital versions of many popular magazines for free with Zinio. Log in to browse the collection.

                Music                     


With Freegal, you can stream three hours of music daily, and download five songs to keep each week. It’s all free. Free downloadable music videos also available.

 

South Carolina State Library Resources

   
Check out ebrary academic eBooks from the South Carolina State Library. This collection includes computer & IT books. A South Carolina State Library card is required. Click here to apply. SELF-e: A digital self-publishing platform for South Carolina writers made available by the South Carolina State Library. Click here to learn more.
 Children's Books, Lessons and Games
   
Introduce children to science and math through storybooks. Read-along audio books are available in English and Spanish.  
The TumbleBook Library is a collection of free interactive animated talking storybooks for children. Stories are available in several languages. 
 
 If you need help with any of these services, call 843-805-6930 or email AskAQuestion@ccpl.org. 
John's Island hosting job fair Wednesday
 

Local residents can get job assistance at John's Island Regional Library's Job Fair from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Wednesday, August 21.

Job seekers can meet local employers, get assistance with writing a winning resume and cover letter, learn tips to improve online job searches and find out how to get a criminal record expunged. And, for anyone interested in starting their own business, counselors will be available to provide help with everything from writing a business plan, researching potential competitors and developing marketing strategies.

Some of the local employers planning to attend are: Kiawah Island Golf Resort, Charleston County School District, Charleston County Government, East Coast Migrant Head Start and Sea Island Habitat for Humanity.

Additionally, residents can get help with their job search from organizations like: S.C. Works, SCORE (Service Corps of Retired Executives), the Ninth Circuit Solicitor's Office, Sea Island Chamber of Commerce and Sea Island Habitat for Humanity.

Charleston County Councilmember Anna Johnson will be there from 11 a.m.-12 p.m. to meet area residents, hear their concerns and answer questions.

The job fair is jointly sponsored by Charleston County Public Library in addition to Charleston County Government and Kiawah Cares.

 

 
The Palmetto Tree: Defender of South Carolina

To commemorate the 236th anniversary of Carolina Day on June 28, CCPL's Charleston Archives manager and public historian, Dr. Nic Butler, explains how South Carolinians used palmetto trees during the American Revolution to fortify Sullivan's Island, James Island and downtown Charleston to successfully deflect a British invasion.

Tuesday, June 25 at 6 p.m.
James Island Library

Wednesday, June 26 at 6 p.m.
Main Library
Check out the OverDrive Digital Bookmobile

Friday from 11 a.m.-5 p.m.
Saturday from 10 a.m. - 4 p.m.
St. Andrews Regional Library - 1735 N. Woodmere Drive: 766-2546

At 74-feet long, OverDrive's Digital Bookmobile dwarfs what most people picture when thinking about a bookmobile.

This behemoth of a vehicle, housed inside an 18-wheel tractor trailer, will visit the St. Andrew's Regional Library Friday and Saturday to help highlight the library's collection of downloadable materials.

Traveling as part of a national tour, OverDrive uses the vehicle as an outreach draw to attract visitors and tell them about the company's and member library's digital services.

The Bookmobile has instructional videos and interactive workstations with a gadget gallery with iPhones, Android tablets, BlackBerrys, Nooks, Sony Readers and Kindles. Visitors can test out the latest devices in this high-tech
digital library on wheels.

Library staff will be on hand to tell patrons about the library's growing collection of downloadable materials, show them how to browse our collections and even help them sign up for a library card.

Don't miss this opportunity to see a "bookmobile on steroids" and learn more about the services offered by OverDrive.

Check out all the library's downloadable media services.
 

YWCA: She's Beautiful When She's Angry film
CCPL closed May 29 for Memorial Day
Sexual Assault Discussion series
Spooktacular Events

FAMILY AND KIDS

Friday, October 30-Saturday, October 31
Trick or Treat at the Library
Otranto Road Regional Library
Stop by the Children’s Desk in your costume to trick or treat.

Friday, October 30
11th Annual CCPL Trick-or-Treat
Main Library from 2:30-5:30 p.m.
Trick or treat your way through the library, and enjoy some Halloween fun. Participants are asked to wear a costume and start their adventure in the Children’s Department.

Trick or Treat Haunted House
John’s Island Regional Library from 3-6 p.m.
Listen to stories, make crafts, get treats and more during this spooky event. 

Saturday, October 31
Library Trick or Treat (ages 12 and younger)
John’s Island Regional Library
Wear your Halloween costume, and receive some candy.

Trick or Treat 
Cooper River Memorial Library
Trick or treat at the Circulation Desk. 

Pipe Cleaner Masks (ages 11 and younger)
James Island Branch Library at 10:30 a.m.
Use your imagination to make pipe cleaner masks. 

Spiderweb Spinners
Poe/Sullivan’s Island Branch Library at 10:30 a.m.
Create spooky or colorful spider web mobiles from popsicles and yarn.

Halloween Craft
Village Branch Library at 10:30 a.m.
Celebrate Halloween, wear your favorite costume and create a spooky craft.

Halloween Family Storytime
Hurd/St. Andrews Regional Library at 11 a.m.
Celebrate Halloween with not-so scary stories and a craft. Costumes are encouraged.

Happy Halloween
McClellanville Branch Library at 11 a.m.
Make a cool trick or treat bag.

Halloween
Edisto Branch Library at 11:30 a.m.
Wear your costume, and play games.

Halloween Fun and Frolic (ages 11 and younger)
Dorchester Road Regional Library at 12:30 p.m.
Enjoy Halloween stories, songs, crafts and trick-or-treating. Costumes are encouraged. 

Trick or Treat
John L. Dart Library from 1-3 p.m.
Wear your costume, stop by the Service Desk for a treat and decorate a trick or treat bag. 

TEEN EVENTS

Friday, October 30 
Fright Fest Halloween Movie Festival 
Main Library at 3:30 p.m.
Teen Lounge
Hocus Pocus. Rated PG; 96 minutes. 

Friday, October 30
Scream Flick 
John L. Dart Library at 3:30 p.m.
Addams Family. Rated PG-13; 105 minutes. Refreshments will be provided.

Friday Night Frights Halloween Party 
Main Library, Teen Lounge from 6-9 p.m.
Treat yourself to a night of spine-tingling fun, food and frights during this after-hours event. Enjoy a costume contest, zombie relay race and more. Please arrive promptly at 6 p.m. 


CLASSES, LECTURES AND FILMS

Saturday, October 31 
Hitchcock Classic Marathon (adults)
Cooper River Memorial Library from 10:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m.
The Birds (1963) Rated PG-13; 119 minutes.
Psycho (1960) Rated R; 109 minutes.
The Birds (1963) Rated PG-13; 119 minutes.
 
"To be a person is to have a story to tell." - Isak Dinesen
 
Meet some of our featured national tellers:
Donald Davis  


Donald Davis was born in a southern Appalachian mountain world rich in stories. Listening to folk tales, fairy tales, true stories and legends of mountain lore as a youngster in North Carolina, Davis absorbed the culture and discovered his life's passion. Weaving stories that capture the audiences' imagination and take them on creative journeys, he shares personal stories while encouraging listeners to draw on their own experiences. The winner of dozens of storytelling awards, including the National Storytelling Network's Lifetime Achievement Award, Davis is considered "among the most popular figures on today's storytelling circuit," according to the Los Angeles Times. A featured teller at the Smithsonian Institution, the World's Fair and festivals and concerts throughout the world, Davis is a prolific author, master teacher, recording artist and a guest host on National Public Radio.

Visit Syd's website

   
Diane Ferlatte  

Diane Ferlatte has wowed audiences across the globe, performing at festivals, theaters, conferences, universities and churches. Her affinity for the craft stems from spending her early childhood years on her grandparent's porch in Louisiana, swapping stories, lies and tales with family and neighbors. A mother of two, Ferlatte began telling stories to entice her second child to read rather than watch television. Known for dynamic characterization with animation, expression and interaction, the New Orleans native believes the tradition of storytelling must be nurtured. A Grammy nominee and international award winner, Ferlatte was named to the National Storytelling Network's Circle of Excellence Award for her commitment to the art of storytelling.

Visit Donna's website

   
David Novak  

David Novak is an award-winning storyteller who uses his background in theater to engage and entertain audiences. Described as "the Brothers Grimm and Carl Jung meets Monty Python," Novak creates experiences to promote imagination, engage emotion and discover common ground with his listeners. Through his highly interactive performances, he contrasts simplicity with complexity, the familiar with the surprising and the ordinary with the fabulous. From the simple power of the spoken word to the circus hijinks of a veteran entertainer, this North Carolina performer offers unique stories that feature universal themes of character, courage, caring and wonder. A teacher, author, recording artist and professional actor, Novak was honored with the National Storytelling Network's Circle of Excellence Award.

Visit Barbara's website

   
Dovie Thomason
 

Dovie Thomason learned Indian stories from her Kiowa Apache and Lakota relatives, especially her grandmother and father, and has dedicated her life to sharing her Native American culture through storytelling. Her wise, boisterous tales come alive in listeners' imaginations as Thomason use sly humor and astonishing vocal transformation in her performances. Using elegance, wit and passion, she inspires delight in the spoken word and teaches respect for values passed on through generations. The Pennsylvania resident is an award-winning storyteller and has performed throughout the world, including Shakespeare's Globe Theatre, the Smithsonian Institution and the Kennedy Center. She also is a published author, recording artist and narrator of children's books, and the National Storytelling Network named her to their Circle of Excellence.

Visit Barbara's website 

 

Meet some of our featured local and regional tellers:
Sharon Cooper-Murray  

Known as “the Gullah Lady,” Sharon Cooper-Murray’s affinity for the indigenous Lowcountry culture is manifested through the tales she tells. After hearing the Creole language for the first time during a post-college trip to Wadmalaw Island, Sharon devoted herself to decades of preserving, conserving and developing the Gullah way of life through language, music, arts and crafts.

 

Visit Sharon’s web site

   
Julian Gooding  

Storyteller, documentary filmmaker and percussionist Julian Gooding uses drumming and oral traditions of West Africa to open and engage the creative mind and spirit of a child. His interactive storytelling style encourages both children and adults to take part in each story and become the characters or create mood and imagery with props and world percussion.

   
Hawk Hurst  

Hawk Hurst shares stories that bring the wonders and wisdom of ancient cultures to life. An accomplished naturalist and master craftsman, he personally creates many of the Native American-style flutes and drums used during his performances. An eight-time recording artist and the author of two children’s books, Hawk has presented educational programs nationally and internationally for more than two decades.

 

Visit Hawk’s web site

   
Minerva King  

Minerva King is a multicultural storyteller who specializes in African, African-American, West Indian, Native American and Jewish folklore. Fond of incorporating music to engage listeners in her programs, Minerva’s tales are based on historical events and her personal experiences.

   
Tim Lowry  

Tim Lowry grew up in southeastern Kentucky, where he learned the art of storytelling from Appalachian folk who told tales to entertain, teach morals and pass along local history. A storyteller for more than 20 years, Tim performs a variety of folk tales and stories about the South Carolina Lowcountry. An award-winning storyteller, he recently performed at the National Storytelling Festival in Jonesborough, Tenn.

 

Visit Tim’s web site

   
Becky's Box of Puppets  

Since beginning her puppetry career in 1980, Becky Becker combines music, puppets, props and audience interaction to help children discover the joy of reading through her Box of Puppets performances. A popular guest at festivals, corporate events, school residencies, teacher workshops, and summer reading programs, Becker enjoys sharing the magic of puppetry with young people and those still young at heart.

Visit Becky’s web site

 

 

Go back to the Charleston Tells Main Page

The Business side of Self-Publishing
Library closures for Aug. 21 solar eclipse

In anticipation of the eclipse and the expected influx of people and cars on 
the peninsula and around the McClellanville area, CCPL will close the following branches on Monday, August 21: 

  •        Main Library (including Bookmobile services) 
  •        John L. Dart Library
  •        McClellanville Library

Book drops will remain open.

 

PSA starring DIVERGENT's Veronica Roth
Friends, family and co-workers gathered Monday at the John L. Dart Branch Library to honor one of those lost in the Emanuel AME Church shootings by dedicating a bright, wall-sized, geometric mural in her honor.

Cynthia Graham Hurd was full of life, full of joy and full of love for the Charleston County Public Library and all those who visited the branches she worked at or managed in her 31 years with the library. For more than 20 of those years, she worked at or managed the Dart Branch - the very branch that this self-proclaimed book nerd visited as a child growing up in Charleston's neck area.

"The mural is a beacon," said current Dart Manager Kim Odom, a close friend who considered Cynthia a mentor. "It brings people to one of the places she loved most in the neighborhood she grew up in. This is always where you'd find Cynthia. She'd be here among children, doing what she love while engaging and serving the people she loved."

According to Odom, it "expresses the joy that Cynthia expressed," and Monday's event allowed the people who loved Cynthia to come together and honor her legacy. "The event and the love shared during the dedication took my breath away"

Creating the mural, finding the artist and getting the funds were a true community effort. It was a collaboration between Charleston County Public Library, Enough Pie and was partially funded by donations from Winston & Strawn LLP.

The artist, Nick Kuszyk, aka R. ROBOTS, painted the bright, colorful mural on the south side of the John L. Dart Branch Library earlier this year. The New York resident is known for doing large public art projects, and his paintings grace walls in Berlin, Prague, London, Tel Aviv and throughout the United States.

"The mural serves as a bright, colorful invitation for all to come inside and experience the wonders of the library and explore books," said Catherine Zommer with Enough Pie, an organization that is spearheading community improvements in the area and that helped back the creation of the mural.

During Cynthia's 31 years at the library, she touched the lives of thousands of people - encouraging children during their earliest days as new readers and then watching them return with homework assignments, to fill out applications for colleges and jobs and, ultimately, with children of their own.

She was managing the St. Andrews Regional Library, the second busiest of the library system's 16 branches, at the time of her death. On Tuesday, which would have been her 56th birthday, ceremonies were held to rename the branch the Cynthia Graham Hurd St. Andrews Regional Library.

Although books were always nearby, she served the community in other ways, including: working part-time at the College of Charleston's Addlestone Library; serving on the board of Housing Authority of the City of Charleston; joining Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Inc.; and being active in her family's place of worship - Emanuel AME Church.

April 25 Author Talk with Angela Williams
Babygarten
 

What is Babygarten?

Click here for Babygarten storytimes

Nursery Rhymes and Songs
Infants in the womb are soothed by the ever present beat of a mother’s heartbeat, and babies of all ages respond to a steady beat, no matter what form it takes – rhymes, music, windshield wipers, dishwashers, etc. Rhymes also provide interesting repetition of the sounds we use in everyday language. Using familiar rhymes on a regular basis encourages children to make sounds and, eventually, to form words.

Book Sharing
Books will be read in unison (yes, the same ones over and over and over), and the instructor may recommend books that are popular with babies. For infants, a book represents the closeness of being held and the soft sounds that come from a familiar voice. Eventually, they understand how a book “works” and that the black squiggles somehow correspond with the sounds of the reader. These early literacy skills better prepare children for a lifetime of learning.

Parenting Information
A multitude of skills or hurdles will be addressed as the class works on rhyming, reading, playing and other activities. Instructor will explain many of these issues with quick facts, demonstrations or simply through conversation. Questions are encouraged, and staff members are happy to help, but sometimes the best source may be the person sitting next to you in the class.

Handmade Toys and Mementos
The playthings that babies enjoy most are always the least expensive ones. Learn how to construct simple, effective toys from items around the house. Also, to help capture those fleeting, precious moments of babyhood, learn how to make baby books and perfect gifts for grandparents. 

Free Play Period
Each session will end with the fun opportunity for caregivers and babies just to play. Playing is how babies learn, and this will help enhance their enjoyment and enlightenment. It’s also fun to see how other people play and how babies respond to one another. Make some great discoveries just by watching and talking to others.

Andy Brack, Chairman:
Andy Brack is a communications strategist and publisher who produces two weekly publications - Charleston Currents, which focuses on good Lowcountry news, and Statehouse Report, a respected legislative and policy forecast about South Carolina. He also writes a syndicated newspaper column and serves as chairman and president of the nonprofit Center for a Better South. A former U.S. Senate press secretary, Brack was named a White House "Champion of Change" in 2011 for leadership in developing transformational ideas for Gulf Coast recovery following a 2010 oil spill that devastated the area. A former congressional candidate, Brack is a past president of the Rotary Club of Charleston and the S.C. Wildlife Federation. He has a bachelor's degree in psychology from Duke University and a master's degree in journalism from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Brack was appointed to the Charleston County Public Library Board of Trustees in 2014. He and his family live in Charleston.

Steven Clem, Vice Chairman:
A finance and tax professional, Steven Clem, E.A. is the founder and president of the Clem Collaborative, a firm specializing in tax preparation, tax planning and financial planning for individuals, small businesses, estates and trusts. He was appointed to the Library's Board of Trustees in 2011. Clem found his career at an early age when he did his first tax return for a college roommate for $20 and soon found himself doing taxes for friends, classmates and faculty members. A transplanted New Englander, he moved to Charleston in 2001. He sits on the State Board of the National Association of Tax Professionals and is active in several local and national LGBT organizations. He has a bachelor's degree in finance from Fairfield University. An avid cook, oenophile, reader and traveler, Clem lives on James Island with his "furry son," Oliver.

Maya Hollinshead, Secretary:
A native of North Charleston, Maya Hollinshead is a program assistant with the Medical University of South Carolina Library where she is responsible for coordinating the university's Hands of Health-South Carolina website to provide South Carolina residents with reliable health-related information. She joined the Charleston County Public Library Board of Trustees in 2010. Active in several civic and professional organizations, Hollinshead is a member of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc., Omega Phi Alpha National Service Sorority, the American Library Association, the Medical Library Association and the Special Libraries Association. She has a bachelor's degree in journalism and a master's degree in library and information studies, both from the University of South Carolina. She also has a certificate in organizational and corporate communications from the College of Charleston.

Susan Strunk, Treasurer:
Having spent her career as a librarian, Susan Strunk worked for 25 years at libraries in the suburban Chicago area before retiring as director of the Palatine Public Library in Illinois. Strunk was appointed to the Charleston County Public Library Board of Trustees in 2015. She has a bachelor's degree in elementary education from Iowa State and a master's degree in library science from Northern Illinois University. A resident of West Ashley, Strunk is a member of the Rotary Club of St. Andrews and volunteers at Stono Park and Drayton Hall elementary schools. During her free time, she enjoys reading and playing classical guitar.

Ed Fava:
A retiree, E.E. (Ed) Fava served for 12 years as administrator for Charleston County Government after completing a 26-year career in the U.S. Navy. He was appointed to the Charleston County Public Library Board of Trustees in 2010. Fava is a former member of Charleston County Council and has served on boards for the Heritage Corridor, S.C. Aquarium, Roper Hospital, The Charleston Museum, the Charleston Area Regional Transportation Authority, the Charleston Regional Development Alliance, the South Carolina Association of Counties, and was a member of the Council of Governments and the Rotary Club of Charleston. Fava has won numerous recognitions, including honors and awards from the military and the community along with the S.C. Order of the Palmetto. He has a bachelor's degree in business from the University of Mississippi and a master's degree in financial management from the U.S. Navy Post Graduate School.

Rosemary Manigault-Hodges: 
After 28 years in the insurance and financial services industry, Rosemary (Rose) Manigault-Hodges started and sold her own Allstate Insurance Agency before ultimately taking her current position as a Coordinator of Off Sites at Trident Technical College. She joined the Charleston County Public Library Board of Trustees in 2013. Manigault-Hodges is a member of the St. Paul's Exchange Club and Chums, Inc. Charleston Chapter. She attends Annivesta Missionary Baptist Church in Hollywood and is a member of Mt. Olivet Reformed Episcopal Church in Rantowles. Manigault-Hodges has a bachelor's degree in business administration and education from Baptist College, now known as Charleston Southern University, and a master's degree in human resource development from Webster University. She and her husband have four children and four grandchildren.

Peter McKellar III:
A retired architect, Peter McKellar was president of McKellar & Associates, Inc. in the 1980s-1990s when the architectural firm was hired to design six branches of Charleston County Public Library - the Main Library and all five regional libraries. He was appointed to the Library's Board of Trustees in 2011. A native of Bennettsville, McKellar was vice president of Cummings & McCrady, Inc. before starting his own architectural firm. In addition to designing the library branches, he also worked on the S.C. Ports Authority office building, U.S. Air Force Flight Simulator buildings in several southeastern locations plus office buildings, schools, airports and buildings for the U.S. Department of Defense. McKellar has a bachelor's degree in architecture from Clemson University.

Brian Norris:
An expert in Latin America, Dr. Brian Norris is an assistant professor in The Citadel's Department of Criminal Justice. Norris joined the Charleston County Public Library Board of Trustees in 2014. A resident of Latin America for five years, he has traveled professionally to the region 26 times since 1997 and worked in Bolivia, El Salvador, Paraguay, Ecuador, Panama and Argentina. The author of numerous scholarly and technical articles about Latin America, Norris also speaks often at symposiums and conferences. He currently is writing Prison Bureaucracies in Mexico, the US, India and Honduras, which is under contract for publication in 2017. Norris has a bachelor's degree in business administration from the University of Texas at Arlington, a master's degree in Latin American studies from the University of Texas at Austin and his doctorate degree in international relations from John's Hopkins/SAIS. He lives in Charleston with his wife and three daughters.

Margaret Reider:
An avid reader her whole life, Margaret (Peggy) Reider is lead guide at the Drayton Hall Historic Site. She joined the Charleston County Public Library Board of Trustees in 2009. Reider's love for reading goes back to one of her very first jobs when she helped stack books in the basement of her hometown library in Chatham, N.J. during the summer of 1952. A graduate of Bates College in Maine, Reider spent her career directing volunteer programs for various non-profit organizations, including the Girl Scouts, the Retired Senior Volunteer Program, the Youth for Understanding's High School Exchange Program and the American Red Cross.

Janet Segal:
Active in the community and civic affairs, Janet Segal has worked as a political consultant for both local and federal candidates. She was appointed to the Charleston County Public Library Board of Trustees in 2008 and plans to work on the foundation committee to support the library when her board term ends in December 2016. Segal is cofounder and director of the local non-profit Begin with Books, an affiliate of Dolly Parton's Imagination Library that is dedicated to promoting literacy and providing books for preschoolers. Currently retired, Segal enjoyed a variety of careers, including: working as a conservation technologist in a museum; serving as an arbitrator; founding and working with several non-profits; managing the shipyard for the Spirit of SC; owning an event company; and serving as director of education for the Spoleto Festival USA. Segal holds a bachelor's degree in education from the State University of New York at Buffalo and a master's degree in special education from the State University of New York College at Buffalo.

Troy Strother:
Originally from New York City, Troy Strother has spent his career in education and managing non-profits, ultimately leading him to his current position as director of programs for YouthBuild USA in Charleston. He joined the Charleston County Public Library Board of Trustees in 2015. Strother started his career with the New York City Housing Authority and worked with the National Association of Service and Conservation Corps in Washington, D.C. before moving to Charleston to work for Youth Service Charleston and the Boys & Girls Club of the Trident area. He is active in numerous community organizations and committees, including: The Mayor's Commission for Children, Youth and Families; The Dropout Prevention Taskforce; The Advisory Council for the Charleston County School Health Committee; The National Association of Service and Conservation Corp; Low Country's Promise; the Association of Fundraising Professionals; and Footlight Players. He received a bachelor's degree in fine arts from the College of Santa Fe and a master's degree in education from New York University. He lives in Charleston with his wife and daughter.

Moving Star: Exhibit and Performance
Western Film Series
Freegal Music: A free music service
Freegal allows customers to stream three hours of music daily and download five music tracks to keep each week. This free music service offers access to approximately 9 million songs from genres including rock, hip-hop, top 40, pop, country, classical, reggae, jazz, blues, Latin and more through the Sony Music Entertainment catalog. 

Access to streaming music is one of many free digital services available through the library’s website. Customers can also download free eBooks, audio books and magazines plus enjoy interactive storybooks and online activities for children. So far this year, county residents have downloaded or checked out 200,000 digital titles from the library’s online services. The vast majority, approximately 60 percent, are free downloadable eBooks that people read on their digital devices or computers.

For a full list of all the free digital materials available, check the Downloadable Media link on the left side of the library’s homepage –  www.ccpl.org

Local residents overwhelmingly approved a referendum to build five new libraries and renovate thirteen others in November 2014. Learn more about the progress made since then: 

The first phase of the overall project involved soliciting community input for the five new library locations. One of CCPL’s top priorities during this process was obtaining practical information from public library users. During fall 2015, community meetings were held in each region slated to receive a new library facility. Residents turned out in large numbers to share their opinions. CCPL staff, along with an architectural consulting team, compiled all the feedback received during this process. While similar comments were made at all locations, residents also shared wonderful stories about what makes each community unique. 

Through a competitive process this year, the County decided to pursue a Design-Build plan for the design and construction of the new libraries. This means that the County selects a general contractor who then selects the architects for each project. The resulting design teams ensure that the final product represents that specific community and that construction consistency is maintained across locations for ease and affordability of future maintenance.

During 2016, through a competitive process, the County selected a Design-Build team to design and construct the new libraries.  This means that each of the new libraries has a dedicated design team to ensure that each location will offer a true sense of place unique to that specific community. The Design-Builder will complete all construction to maintain consistency across all locations for ease and affordability of future maintenance.

The County provided the five design teams with community feedback for each location as well as a detailed program specific to each building.  Here is a brief update on the status of each of the new libraries: 

  • The County is working closely with Charleston County School District on the new West Ashley location.

  • The Sherriff's complex on the Cooper River replacement site is set to be demolished this winter, and a future round of demolition will allow for the construction of a completely new facility.

  • While civil engineers develop a St. Paul's/Hollywood replacement site plan that supports efficient access to the location, the design team is at work to create floor plans that will enable the branch to serve as a new community hub.

  • The James Island replacement is in the midst of schematic design, and CCPL representatives met with the design team to review the propose plan.

  • The new Mt. Pleasant location design team created multiple schematic proposals for review by CCPL, and they are now fine-tuning these possibilities to meet the specific needs of the local community.

CCPL anticipates breaking ground on the first library in late spring of 2017. The others will follow with staggered start dates to allow for a more evenly distributed work flow amongst the design and construction teams.

Do you have a new library going up in your neighborhood? Keep your eyes out for project signs that will be installed in December. These signs will be updated with relevant information as the projects progress. Visit www.ccpl.org/construction for additional updates as progress continues. 

Teen Lock In at Dart Library

 Charleston County Public Library Director Search 
Finalists’ Bios 

June 2016 


Nicolle Davies
 
Davies is executive director of the Arapahoe Library District in Englewood, Colo. Prior to becoming executive director, she was deputy executive director with the District. During her work at Arapahoe Library District, Davies implemented new staffing models, passed a levy increase in November 2015 and was named 2016 Librarian of the Year by Library Journal Magazine. Davies is president-elect for the Rotary Club of Centennial and is active on several committees for the American Library Association, the Public Library Association and the Colorado Association for Libraries. She has a Master’s Degree in Library and Information Science from the University of Wisconsin and a Master’s Degree in Public Administration from the University of Colorado.

Alan Kornblau
Kornblau is director of the Delray Beach Public Library in Delray Beach, Fla. Prior to moving to Delray Beach, he was library director of the Oakland Park Public Library in Oakland Park, Fla. While at Delray Beach Public Library, Kornblau established the Lifelong Learning Community Institute, nearly doubled the library’s Endowment Fund to $3 million and organized a $500,000 capital project campaign to renovate the library’s children’s department. Delray Beach Public Library received the Greater Delray Beach Chamber of Commerce Non-Profit Organization of the Year Award for 2011-2012. Kornblau is on the board of the Greater Delray Beach Chamber of Commerce, the Rotary Club of Delray Beach and the West Atlantic Redevelopment Coalition. He has a Master’s Degree in Library Science from Florida State University.

Michael Steinmacher
Steinmacher is director of the Barr Memorial Library at the Fort Knox Army Base in Fort Knox, Ky. Prior to coming to Fort Knox, he managed branch services for the Louisville Free Public Library in Louisville, Ky. While at Barr Memorial Library, Steinmacher implemented the LibraryBox outreach initiative, developed an Authors at Your Library program series and used library technologies to initiate several new services. Barr Memorial Library was named the 2014 Library of Congress/FEDLINK Federal Library of the Year and achieved the Department of Defense Premier Library status in 2014. Steinmacher has developed and hosts the Off the Page library podcast. He serves on the Kentucky Virtual Alliance Board and the Army Library Steering Committee. He has a Master’s in Library Science from the University of Kentucky and a Master of Arts in Liberal Studies.

Read for the Record Events at the Library
Lowcountry Author Talk: Cancelled


Charleston County Public Library's summer reading program is for children ages 11 and younger. Enjoy this FREE program at any of our locations from June 1 through July 31. Register online at home or at any CCPL branch, and keep track of points earned by reading or listening to a story. One page or one minute = one point. Earn prizes when you reach 300 points (5 hours), 900 points (15 hours) and 1800 points (30 hours). 

 
Helpful Summer Reading Links: 


 
Find events near you I Storytime Schedule 

Review Reading recommendations
 I Download the Spanish brochure 

Summer Reading Prize Categories: 


5 hours/300 points
 ~
 reading certificate, bookmark and Charleston RiverDogs game pass. 

15 hours/900 points ~ S.C. Reading Medal, a community partner prize and an entry in the Charleston RiverDogs' 
Field of Dreams raffle.

30 hours/1800 points ~ entry in the Grand Prize Drawing, South Carolina Aquarium ticket, Sky Zone jump pass and a McDonald's Happy Meal coupon. 

Grand Prize Drawing 
Sixteen lucky winners, one from each branch, will receive an amazing package that includes prizes from all of our generous sponsors. 
Winners will be selected Aug. 1.

Summer Reading for Babies: 


Enjoy this free program designed especially for pre-readers to help build early literacy skills with simple, fun activities that parents and children can do together. Register and complete tasks to collect a board book and tote bag.
Learn why Summer Reading is so important: 


Build a Better World PSA in 
English and Spanish I Avoid the Summer Slide 

Summer Reading Sponsors:

 


 

                            
     
 
                   
     
                 
     

 

     

 

Building Referendum passes by nearly 3-to-1

CHARLESTON COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY
FOR RELEASE - November 4, 2014
UPDATED - September 2015
    


VOTERS APPROVE LIBRARY REFERENDUM
BY NEARLY THREE-TO-ONE MARGIN

Full election results for Charleston County
       
Local residents showed their support for Charleston County Public Library in November 2014 by overwhelmingly approving a referendum to build five new libraries and renovate 13 others, including major technology and building upgrades.

By nearly a three-to-one margin, 69,530 voters, or 74 percent, supported the library's building and renovation plan  - a similar margin to a library building referendum that passed in 1986.
Quick Facts

Map of building plan

Building cost estimates

Charleston County and Library officials have worked since the election to put the foundation in place for this massive undertaking. The focus has been on finding land for the new buildings and developing bid-type documents to go out in Spring 2015 to hire architects. Once building architects are in place, the library plans to hold a series of public meetings to find out what key services are most important to residents in the different areas of the county.

"This is truly the beginning of a new era in Charleston County," said Library Board Chairman Janet Segal. "We spent nearly four years developing this plan and working hand-in-hand with residents to make sure it reflected what local residents want. In meetings, and even in independent surveys, county residents told us they love their libraries, and said they wanted more and better library services. Today, they showed that love in the voting booth."

The $108.5 million plan includes construction or renovation of 19 buildings throughout the county. Five new libraries would be constructed – two in areas of rapid growth (the East Cooper/Carolina Park and West Ashley/Bees Ferry Road areas) and three to replace outdated facilities that aren’t able to meet customer needs (the Cooper River Memorial Branch in North Charleston plus the James Island and St. Paul’s/Hollywood branches). A total of 13 existing libraries would be renovated, the library’s support staff would be relocated from the Main Library to free up space for public use, and the library’s technology would be upgraded to include self-checkout kiosks, more public computers and the latest equipment in meeting rooms.

The construction will cost $11.20 annually for households with a $100,000 owner-occupied home. Operating costs will be phased in and will be approximately $6.80 annually in 2019-2020.

"This will mean better library services for all county residents, from infants to retirees. It's going to be an exciting time," said Executive Director Doug Henderson. "This truly is an important day for this generation and for the generations to come.”

The next step will be meeting with Charleston County officials to develop a timeline and work together to hire architects to help with building design. The overall plan is expected to take approximately six years to complete. Henderson said meetings will be scheduled with residents to get input about the specific services they see as priorities for their neighborhood libraries.

Henderson said there are a lot of people to thank for the hard work that went into developing the plan and educating the residents about the final proposal.

“First, we have to thank all the residents and library users who continually offered their support, " Henderson said. "We also must thank the members of Charleston County Council and county staff, the library’s Board of Trustees, the donors and volunteers who offered their service and time to the Vote Yes for Charleston Libraries Committee, members of the Charleston Friends of the Library and to the library’s staff members. Every day, they share their passion for libraries and this community.” 

The plan was developed after a detailed assessment of the library’s existing facilities, a review of population growth patterns since the 1986 referendum, a study of changing technologies, a look at library service trends plus multiple meetings, surveys, focus groups and interviews to determine community needs. An independent consultant helped the library develop a Strategic Plan and identify shortcomings that needed attention.

Since the 1986 referendum, the county's population grew 27 percent while the library's circulation soared 289 percent in the same period. Last year’s circulation was 3.3 million items and nearly 210,000 people attended programs, classes, exhibits, concerts and similar programs at one of CCPL’s 16 branches.

"To be a person is to have a story to tell." - Isak Dinesen
 
About Charleston Tells

What is Storytelling?
Storytelling brings communities together around the world. As one of the oldest forms of communication, the act of one person sharing a story is the simple truth behind enduring cultures, traditions, ideas, memories, beliefs and values. 
  

  "Storytelling is an art with a rich heritage as deep as Charleston's."
- Charleston Major Joseph P. Riley Jr.

 

What is Charleston Tells? 
Charleston Tells has transformed from an annual multi-day festival to a quarterly concert series that entertains audiences with the best local, regional and national talent. Featured performers celebrate the art of storytelling, the human experience, and the Lowcountry's rich heritage. By extending performances throughout the year, tourists, locals and students have a unique opportunity to celebrate the shared human experience of storytelling and engage with this art form more frequently and in greater depth. 
 

Parking Information:
Parking is available underneath the Main Library, located at 68 Calhoun Street in downtown Charleston. 

 

Go back to the Charleston Tells Main Page

Marian Wright Edelman Book Discussions
Learn about new West Ashley branch design

Contact:                              July 17, 2017
Natalie Hauff, PR Manager
Phone: 843-805-6817
Email: hauffn@ccpl.org  

Library architects to present designs for new branch in West Ashley during July 24 community meeting

CHARLESTON, SC – Charleston County Public Library (CCPL) will host a community meeting on Monday, July 24 to share information with the public about updated designs for the new library branch that will be located in West Ashley. Local residents overwhelmingly approved a referendum in November 2014 to build five new Charleston County Public Library branches and renovate 13 others. Behind-the-scenes progress has been made on the library building projects since then, and residents are invited to this community meeting to listen to a presentation by the architects and participate in a question and answer session with CCPL and Charleston County Government staff.

Meeting date/location:
Monday, July 24 at 7 p.m.
Drayton Hall Elementary School Cafeteria
3183 Ashley River Rd., Charleston

To learn more about the construction and renovation plan, view a map and see a breakdown of the estimated costs, visit http://bit.ly/1nw9TB4.  

 

Charleston County Public Library's summer reading program encourages and rewards children ages 11 and younger for reading or listening to stories. Use the library's summer reading log to keep track of what you read, and turn it in for great prizes. Prize drawings are held throughout the summer, and all you need to do is visit the library or attend a program to enter. Enjoy this FREE program at any of our locations from June through August.

Click here to find Summer Reading Events near you.

Check out the Dig Into Reading YouTube video

Not sure what to read? Check out these recommendations.


This year, Summer Reading is easier than ever. 
To win great prizes, all you need to do is follow these steps:

1. Pickup or download a 2013 summer reading log. 

2. Enter your name, age and zip code on your reading log.

3. Read 10 books.

4. Write the book titles in the summer reading log.

5. Return the log to your local branch library. 

     Click here to download the reading logClick here to download the reading log in Spanish.  





Dig Into Weekly Prizes
Every week at each branch, prizes will be drawn from those visiting the branch or attending one of our many great programs. 

Dig Into Monthly RiverDogs Bonus Prizes 
June: Sit side-by-side with play-by-play announcer Sean Houston during a RiverDogs game. 
July: Visit The Joe baseball stadium, and take a behind-the-scenes tour.

Dig Into Reading Branch Grand Prizes 
Sixteen lucky winners will receive an amazing package with prizes from our generous sponsors and a chance to walk the Field of Dreams at the "Celebrate Summer Reading with the Riverdogs" game on August 11.

     


 

 

Summer Reading for Babies

It's never too early to introduce babies and toddlers 
to the library!

Dig Into Reading for babies, a program designed for pre-readers, helps build early literacy skills with simple, fun activities that parents and children can do together. Pick up a form, complete the tasks and turn it in for a free board book. Babies' grown-ups can enter a drawing to win a Dig Into Reading tote bag to carry those board books when visiting the library. Click here for more information. 

 


 

Thanks to our sponsors!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

     

 

 

 

Sign-up for Smart911 this Saturday
Sciencetellers: Dragons and Dreams

Can't make it to storytime at the library? Bring storytime home with you!

Each kit is centered around a theme that is interesting to preschoolers. Each kit contains eight books, early learning toys, activities and puppets to help build on that theme. Since singing and movement are such important components of building early literacy skills, you will also find handouts of rhymes and action songs.

Preschoolers whose parents and caregivers read to them, tell them stories and sing songs with them tend to develop larger vocabularies, become better readers and perform better in school.

Children who have not had these experiences typically start school with poor early literacy skills. When parents read to children, they hear more complex language which becomes the building blocks of their literacy and language development.        

Reading is the single most important way to help your child get ready to read.


Kit Themes
 
ABC's
Bathtime
Bears
Bedtime
Birds
Bugs
Cats
Colors
Dinosaurs
Dogs
Farm
Feelings
Garden
Imagination
Jungle
Monkeys
Numbers
Ocean
Opposites
Rabbits
Seasons
Shapes
Space
Transportation
Weather 

The Charleston County Public Library also offers a wonderful selection of free children's music to be streamed and dowloaded. Visit Downloadable Media to learn more.

The Cynthia Graham Hurd Storytime Kits To-Go are funded by a donor who wishes to honor the work and memory of CCPL's librarian who dedicated her life to early literacy community education, and life-long learning.

 

 

"To be a person is to have a story to tell." - Isak Dinesen
 
Featured performers: 
Robert Jones  

Friday, March 17 from 7-8:30 p.m.
Main Library, 68 Calhoun Street, Charleston S.C. 

Robert Jones is an inspirational storyteller and musician who celebrates the history, humor and power of American roots music. He entertains audiences throughout the U.S., Canada and Europe with a repertoire that blends timeless stories with original and traditional songs. An award-winning multi-instrumentalist, Jones is accomplished at guitar, harmonica, mandolin, banjo and fiddle. At the heart of his message is the belief that our cultural diversity tells a story that should celebrate, not just tolerate. 

Visit Robert's website

   
Kate Campbell  

Friday, August 25 from 7-8:30 p.m.
Main Library, 68 Calhoun Street, Charleston S.C. 

The people and culture of the modern South serve as the inspiration for the songs of Nashville-based singer/songwriter Kate Campbell. The daughter of a Baptist preacher, Kate uses her songs to chronicle the societal changes below the Mason-Dixon Line. Her endearing, clear-water vocal delivery and her eloquent gift for storytelling have drawn repeated comparisons to such bastions of the Southern literary tradition as Flannery O'Connor, Eudora Welty, and William Faulkner. 

Visit Kate's website

   
Tim Lowry  

Friday, November 17 from 7-8:30 p.m.
Main Library, 68 Calhoun Street, Charleston S.C. 

Tim Lowry grew up in southeastern Kentucky, where he learned the art of storytelling from Appalachian folk who told tales to entertain, teach morals and pass along local history. A storyteller for more than 20 years, Tim performs a variety of folk tales and stories about the South Carolina Lowcountry. With a Southern manner and a droll side-wit, Tim is equally at home in an Appalachian log cabin, a Mandan wigwam, a New York theater, a Texas ranch house, or a South Carolina plantation.

Visit Tim's website


 

Go back to the Charleston Tells Main Page

 One Book Charleston County - Related Books


Looking for books similar to Divergent? Check out the following options available from Charleston County Public Library. Click on the book images below to access titles within the Library's catalog.  

 Adult Fiction
The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood
A woman is forced to live as a concubine for a leader of a fundamentalist theocratic government. Though her stated purpose is to provide children for the Commander, she becomes something more and reveals the new government's hypocrisy.

   
  Oryx & Crake by Margaret Atwood
Snowman, who may be the last human, journeys through a wilderness that was once a great city before uncontrolled genetic engineering changed humanity forever.
   
  The Windup Girl by Paolo Bacigalupi
A chilling future where corporations control the food supply through genetic modification, barely staying ahead of the bioengineered insects and diseases they created.

   
  Pure by Juliana Baggot
In a post-apocalyptic wasteland populated by mutants, three young people struggle to survive and uncover the secrets of their devastated world.

   
Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury
In this classic anti-censorship work, books are banned and firemen dispatched to burn any houses which contain them. One fireman begins to see the shallowness of the system he helps uphold and rebels against it.
   
Parable of the Sower by Octavia Butler
A young woman who feels others' pain as her own makes a dangerous journey in a time when society has reverted to anarchy due to resource scarcity and poverty.

   
  Veracity by Laura Bynum
The population in this future world is controlled via government-sanctioned sex and drugs, and a mandatory implant monitors every word a person speaks.
   
  The Passage by Justin Cronin
Amy, who was abandoned by her mother, is pursued and imprisoned to become part of a government experiment of apocalyptic proportions.

   
  The Office of Mercy by Ariel Djanikian
In this high-tech, underground settlement, there is no hunger or money, and everyone's basic needs are met, but everything is not as perfect as it seems.
   
The Gone-Away World by Nick Harkaway
In a post-apocalyptic world, two friends have been tapped for an incredibly perilous mission. Before their assignment is over they will have encountered everything from mimes, ninjas and pirates to one ultra-sinister mastermind whose only goal is world domination.

   
  The Unit by Ninni Holmqvist
If determined to be "dispensable" by society, residents are convinced to sacrifice themselves for the "necessary" ones.
   
Brave New World by Aldous Huxley
This classic novel describes the horrors of a futuristic utopia devoid of individual freedom.

   
  When She Woke by Hillary Jordan
After waking to find her skin dyed red as punishment for an abortion, a woman must seek refuge from a hostile and threatening society.
   
Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro
Kathy, Ruth and Tommy are best friends who grow up together at an English boarding school with a chilling secret. 
   
The Children of Men by P.D. James
In the year 2021, the human race has become infertile and civilization itself is crumbling. A band of unlikely revolutionaries may hold the key to humanity's survival.

   
Perdido Street Station by China Mievelle
New Crobuzon is a squalid city where humans, Re-mades and arcane races live in perpetual fear of Parliament and its brutal militia.

   
Cloud Atlas by David Mitchell
One of the six narratives in this sweeping novel tells the story of a cloned human who works as a food server. When she's elevated to a higher intellectual level, she learns that the future paradise she's been promised is something far more sinister.

   
1984 by George Orwell
Originally published in 1949, this classic novel depicts life in a totalitarian regime in the year 1984.

   
Anthem by Ayn Rand
In a future dark age where individualism is forbidden, a worker "discovers" electricity and is arrested for his unauthorized intellectual excursions. He escapes to the forest, discovers a trove of ancient books and learns the power of individuality. 
   
  Super Sad True Love Story by Gary Shteyngart
This dark comic tale looks at America's dysfunctional future and examines the timeless and tender feelings that might bring us back from the brink.

   
Robopocalypse by Daniel H. Wilson
In the near future, at a moment no one will notice, all the dazzling technology that runs our world will unite and turn against us. When the Robot War ignites, humankind will be both decimated, and possibly for the first time in history, united.

   

Young Adult Fiction

  The Darkest Minds by Alexandra Bracken
Struck by a virus that wiped out most American children, Ruby finds herself with dangerous powers and imprisoned in a government rehabilitation camp for teens until she manages to escape.
 
Eve by Anna Carey
After a deadly virus has wiped out most of Earth's population, Eve discovers the terrible fate that awaits students when they graduate from their all-girls school, and sets off on a treacherous journey into the wilds of New America.

   
The Roar by Emma Clayton
In a world where all signs of nature have been obliterated and a wall has been erected to keep out plague-ridden animals, Mika refuses to believe that his twin sister was killed and goes in search of her.

   
Matched by Allie Condie
Cassia lives in a society that matches boys and girls for marriage. She is matched with her good friend Xander, but after she sees a glimpse of another boy who she was almost matched with, she wonders who she loves more.

   
The Maze Runner by James Dashner
Thomas wakes up in the middle of a maze with no memory of how he came to be there. He must work with others in the maze community if he hopes to escape.

   
City of Ember by Jeanne DuPrau
In a city where it's always dark, there is no sun, no moon, no light at all unless the electricity is on...and the electricity is beginning to fail.

   
  Frozen by Melissa De la Cruz and Michael Johnston
Nat and a young mercenary set off on a dangerous journey through The Remaining States of America, a land filled with gangsters, corrupt government officials and magic.
   
Gone by Michael Grant
In a small California town, everyone over the age of 14 suddenly disappears, which creates a battle between the remaining residents and the students from a local private school.

   
Those That Wake by Jesse Karp
When a future consumer-driven society runs amok, Mal and Laura find that something or someone has erased them from the memories of everyone they've ever known.

   
The Limit by Kristin Landon
When Matt's family unexpectedly surpasses their government-imposed debt limit, he's whisked away to a workhouse where serious dangers await.

   
The Giver by Lois Lowry
Jonas lives in a perfect world where there is no war, fear or pain. When Jonas turns 12, he is singled out to receive special training from The Giver, who alone holds the memories of the true pain and pleasure of life. Now, it is time for Jonas to learn the truth.

   
  Legend by Marie Lu
In a dark future, a famous criminal and the soldier hired to capture him discover they have a common enemy.
   
  Shatter Me by Tahera Mafi
Ostracized or incarcerated her whole life, Juliette is freed on the condition she use her horrific abilities to support a post-apocalyptic dictatorship.
   
  Delirium by Lauren Oliver
Lena looks forward to receiving the government-mandated cure that prevents the delirium of love and leads to a safe and predictable life, until she accidentally falls in love.
   
Across the Universe by Beth Revis
Amy, a cryogenically frozen passenger on the spaceship Godspeed, wakes up to discover herself trapped in a dystopian society in which someone is trying to kill her.

   
  Under the Never Sky by Veronica Rossi
From radically different societies, two teens hate being dependent on one another until they learn to overcome their prejudices.
   
  The Forest of Hands and Teeth by Carrie Ryan
Living in a walled village surrounded by forest, Mary wants to learn about life, love and the Unconsecrated dwelling in the forest.
   
Unwind by Neal Shusterman
In a society where unwanted teens are salvaged for their body parts, three runaways try desperately to fight the system that would "unwind" them.

   
Article 5 by Kristin Simmons
In this society, Moral Statutes have replaced the Bill of Rights and offenses carry stiff penalties. When the only boy Ember has ever loved arrests her rebellious mother, Ember must take action.

   
  Icons by Margaret Stohl
After an alien force colonizes Earth, four teenagers must piece together the mysteries of their pasts in order to save the future.
   
Quarantine: The Loners by Lex Thomas
When a deadly virus infects their high school, brothers David and Will and the other students break into gangs that fight each other for survival and the hope of escaping their quarantine.

   
  Partials by Dan Wells
In a world ravaged by disease and war, the future rests in the hands of Kira, a young medic in training.
   
Stung by Bethany Wiggins
When the honeybee population collapsed, a worldwide pandemic occurred and the government tried to bio-engineer a cure, but the solution was deadlier than the problem.

   
  The Program by Suzanne Young
When suicide becomes an epidemic, the only cure is a treatment that erases painful memories.

   

 

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Contact Info | Schedule | History
 

Contact Info

Phone: (843) 805-6881
Fax: (843) 727-3741

Bookmobile Manager:
Vacant

Hours of operation: 
Monday - Friday
9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

 

Bookmobile Schedule for Summer 2015:
     
          

 
First and Third Weeks:
   

Mondays

Jan 5., Feb. 2, March 2 and 16, April 6 and 20, May 4 and 18 

9:30 - 10:00
10:00 - 11:00 
11:30 - 12:00
1:30 - 2:00
2:15 - 3:00

Good Shepherd Day Care - Old Town Rd.
Capers Prep. School - Bees Ferry Rd.
Grand Oaks - Magwood Rd. 
Sherman House - Wallenberg Blvd.
Heartland - Sam Rittenberg Blvd.                   

   

Tuesdays

Jan. 6 and 20, Feb. 3 and 17, March 3 and 17, April 7 and 21, May 5 and 19

10:00 - 11:00  
1:00 - 1:45
2:00 - 3:00

Fresh Fields Village - Gardeners Circle 
Cherry Point
 - Rockville
Frierson Elementary - Maybank Hwy.
                          

   

Wednesdays        

Jan. 7 and 21, Feb. 4 and 18, March 4 and 18, April 1 and 15, May 6 and 20

9:45 - 10:15
10:30 - 11:00 
11:15 - 12:00
1:30 - 2:00

Ansonborough House - Society St
Canterbury House - Market St.
Radcliff Manor - Coming St.
Carolina Bay - Savannah Hwy.
  
              

   
Thursdays

Jan, 15, Feb. 5 and 19, March 5 and 19, April 2 and 16, May 7 and 21

9:00 - 9:30 
9:30 - 10:00 
10:00 - 11:00
12:30 - 1:30
2:00 - 2:45          

Belle Hall Elementary - Egypt Rd.
Jones Rec. Center - Egypt Rd. 
Christ Kids Academy - Egypt Rd.
Belle Hall Elementary - Egypt Rd.
Sweet Grass - Mathis Ferry Rd.

 

 

Fridays

Jan. 2 and 16, Feb. 6 and 20, March 6 and 20, April 3 and 17, May 1 and 15

9:30 - 11:00
11:30 - 12:00 
2:00 - 2:45 

East Cooper School - Civitas Street
Somerby Park West - Tradition Court   
The Palms - Bowman Rd. 

   
Second and Fourth Weeks:
                         

Mondays

Jan. 12 and 26, Feb. 9 and 23, March 9 and 23, April 13 and 27, May 11

9:00 - 9:30 
10:00 - 11:00
11:15 - 12:00
1:45 - 2:30 
3:00 - 3:30

Little Grace School - Wentworth St.
Fort Johnson Christian - Camp Rd.
Bishop Gadsden - Camp Rd. 
Sunshine House - Folly Rd. 
Carter May - Ingram Road

   

Tuesdays

Jan. 13 and 27, Feb. 10 and 24, March 10 and 24, April 14 and 28, May 12 and 26

9:30 - 11:30
1:30 - 2:00 
2:30 - 3:00

Charleston Development - Line St.
Marshside Village Apts. - Gullah Ave. 

Villas at Horizon Village - Rivers Ave

   

Wednesdays

Jan. 14 and 28, Feb. 11 and 25, March 11 and 25, April 8 and 22, May 23 and 27

9:30 - 10:30 
10:45 - 11:30  
1:15 - 2:00
2:15 - 3:00

Montessori Community School - Wood Avenue
Gateway Academy - Charlie Hall Blvd.     
Ashley Park Retirement Community - Tobias Gadsden Blvd.
Audacy Creative Arts Preschool – Savannah Hwy.

   

Thursdays

Jan, 8 and 22, Feb. 12 and 26, March 12 and 26, April 9 and 23, May 14 and 28

9:30 - 10:00
10:30 - 11:00 
1:00 - 1:30

Shady Grove Senior Center - Ancrum Hill Rd.
Lincolnville Senior Apt. - Slidell Dr. 
Bridge Assisted Living - Elms Plantation Blvd.                  

   
Fridays

Jan. 9 and 23, Feb. 13 and 27, March 13 and 27, April 10 and 24, May 8 and 22

9:00 - 10:00 
10:30 - 11:00
11:15 - 12:00
2:00 - 3:00

Unity Baptist Daycare and Academy - Whipple Rd.
Franke Home - Rifle Range Road 
Children Discovery - Venning Road
Rudy's Academy - Dingle Road

 
 

History

According to the terms of the Julius Rosenwald agreement which helped to establish the Charleston County Public Library, library services were to be made available to all residents of Charleston County. At a meeting of the Board of Trustees in May of 1931, it was decided that it was impossible to cover the county by any one method. A "book truck" was considered an essential part of the operation. As a result, a Bookmobile was purchased and began service in October of 1931.

In FY2010, more than 27,000 items were circulated by the Bookmobile.

 
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Lowcountry Giving Day: Support the Friends


Charleston Friends of the Library Announces Participation in Lowcountry Giving Day 2016

This online fundraising event will unite donors and nonprofits from across coastal South Carolina on May 3, 2016.

The Charleston Friends of the Library, are a non-profit that supports the programs of the Charleston County Public Library. 

3 WAYS TO SUPPORT THE FRIENDS: 
  • Visit lowcountrygivingday.org anytime on or before May 3 to make a donation. Search ‘Friends of the Charleston County Library’ and click on their name to make a donation.  

  • Mail a check to Friends of the Library, 68 Calhoun St., Charleston, SC 29401. 

  • Text 'Library' to 33923. 
Questions about other ways to support the Charleston Friends of the Library through Lowcountry Giving Day can be directed to Brittany Mathis at director@charlestonlibraryfriends.org or by phone at 843-805-6882. 
Jan. 30 meeting to discuss Mt. Pleasant design

Local residents overwhelmingly approved a referendum in November 2014 to build five new Charleston County Public Library branches and renovate 13 others. Behind-the-scenes progress has been made on the library building projects since then, and residents are invited to a community meeting to learn about updated designs for the new North Mt. Pleasant/Carolina Park Branch Library. Attend this meeting to listen to a presentation by the architects and participate in a question and answer session with CCPL and County staff.

Meeting date/location:
Monday, January 30 at 7 p.m.
Thomas C. Cario Middle School Cafeteria
3500 Thomas Cario Blvd., Mt. Pleasant

Additional community meetings will be scheduled to share design plans for the new Cooper River, James Island, St. Paul’s/Hollywood and West Ashley libraries as the respective design teams for each site reach the necessary stage in the planning process. To learn more about the construction and renovation plan, view a map and see a breakdown of the estimated costs, click here. 

One Book Charleston County: Book Discussions

Bring a friend or meet new ones to discuss the images and issues raised in Veronica Roth's novel, Divergent. Set in the future, the book critically examines society through the eyes of a girl facing difficult life decisions and the consequences of her choices.  

Check out some Divergent discussion questions. Book discussion questions also are included at the end of Divergent.          


With brisk pacing and lavish flights of imagination, Divergent clearly has thrills, but it also movingly expores a more common adolescent anxiety -- the painful realization that coming into one's own sometimes means leaving family behind, both ideologically and physically. - New York Times Book Review. 


Friday, October 4 at 10:30 a.m.
St. Andrews Regional Library

Monday, October 7 at 11 a.m.
West Ashley Branch Library

Monday, October 7 at 10:30 a.m.
Mt. Pleasant Regional Library

Tuesday, October 8 at 4 p.m. (young adult)
Main Library, Meeting Room B

Tuesday, October 8 at 4:30 p.m.
John L. Dart Library

Thursday, October 10 at 4 p.m. (young adult)
Otranto Road Regional Library

Thursday, October 10 at 6:30 p.m.
Village Branch Library

Thursday, October 10 at 6:30 p.m.
Edisto Branch Library

Monday, October 14 at 2 p.m.
James Island Branch Library

Tuesday, October 15 at 10 a.m.
McClellanville Branch Library

Thursday, October 17 at 4:30 p.m.
John's Island Regional Library

Wednesday, October 23 at 6 p.m.
Folly Beach Library

Thursday, October 24 at 4 p.m. (young adult)
Mt. Pleasant Regional Library

Saturday, October 26 at 2 p.m.
West Ashley Branch Library

Saturday, October 26 at 2 p.m.
Dorchester Road Regional Library

Wednesday, October 30 at 6 p.m.
Main Library, Meeting Room B


Enjoyed Divergent and want to read more of author Veronica Roth's trilogy? Follow the story of Tris Prior as she continues her quest to save her loved ones, and herself, in a society divided into factions. Join us for a discussion of Insurgent, the second in the trilogy, and follow the characters through the dramatic conclusion in Allegiant, set for release October 22.

Tuesday, October 15 at 4 p.m. (young adult)
Main Library, Meeting Room B - Insurgent

Tuesday, October 29 at 4 p.m. (young adult)
Main Library, Meeting Room B - Allegiant

 

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St. Andrews Library emergency closing

Due to an irrigation water leak, the St. Andrews Library currently has no water service and is closing at 1 p.m. County personnel are assessing the situation. The branch is expected to reopen on Friday, September 5.

Poe Library Fundraising Event

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The most important back-to-school supply for students is free

 

September is Library Card Sign Up Month, and Charleston County Public Library is encouraging county residents to sign up for a free card – adding it to every child’s school supply list and to every adult’s wallet or key ring. 

This nationwide campaign is held each September to promote signing up in conjunction with the start of school. Studies have shown that children who are read to in the home and who use the library perform better in school and are more likely to use the library as a source of lifelong learning.

Smartest Card Image

In an effort to reach students as they transition from one school or grade to another, Library staff visit schools with a special focus on students in kindergarten and sixth grade. In 2009, more than 7,000 new cards were issued during the county’s campaign with approximately 3,200 of those students receiving their first Library card.

Adults registering for a Library Card during September will receive a $2 Booksale Bucks Coupon that can be used during the Friends of the Library’s 2010 That Big Booksale set for Oct. 7-10 at the Gaillard Municipal Auditorium. Also during the month, current cardholders who have lost their card can get a free replacement, a service that normally costs $2.

In Charleston County, students can get help through the Library’s Ask-A-Question reference service where they can get help from a Reference Librarian by visiting a branch, calling 805-6930, e-mailing askaquestion@ccpl.org or sending an Instant Message to ccplhelp through AIM, MSN Messenger or Yahoo! Messenger. The system’s Reference Librarians answer more questions each year than any other public library in the state – with nearly 2 million questions answered last fiscal year.

The Library’s Web site –
 www.ccpl.org – also offers Homework Help under Services for Children and provides free access to dozens of reliable reference databases in its Resources section, many of them available remotely simply by logging in with a Library card number.

Charleston County Public Library has more than 1.1 million books, nearly 100,000 DVDs and videos, more than 2,300 magazines, newspapers and periodicals subscriptions, about 45,000 audio books and music CDs, nearly 175 electronic subscriptions and databases, plus hundreds of public use computers at the system’s 16 locations.

The Library circulated more than 3.8 million items last budget year and attracted more than 116,000 area residents to its various programs, classes, lectures and workshops.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Dog Days of Summer Main Event
One Book Charleston County Book Discussions

 
 

Bring a friend or meet new ones as we get together to discuss the images and issues raised in Jonathan Safran Foer’s Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close.

Set in the days after the 9/11 attacks on the World Trade Center, the book follows the complex story of a young boy whose father was killed in the disaster. Finding a key in his father’s closet, he begins a journey to find what the key fits and how it was connected to his father. 

Click here to check out some discussion questions.

Saturday, September 15 from 2 – 3 p.m.
Main Library

Wednesday, September 19 from 1 – 2 p.m.
St. Andrews Regional

Thursday, September 20 from 2 – 3 p.m.
James Island Branch

Monday, September 24 from 6:30 – 7:30 p.m.
Otranto Road Regional

Thursday, September 27 from 6 – 7 p.m.
Edisto Branch

Monday, October 1 from 10:30 – 11:30 a.m.
Mt. Pleasant Regional

Wednesday, October 3 from 6 – 7 p.m.
John’s Island Regional

Thursday, October 18 from 6 – 7p.m.
Poe/Sullivan’s Island Branch

Thursday, October 18 from 6:30 – 7:30 p.m.
John L. Dart Branch

Saturday, October 20 at approx. 4 p.m.
Dorchester Road Regional
Follows a showing of the movie.

 

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Meeting Room Policy for the Main Library and Regional Libraries
Purpose: To make meeting rooms available to non-profit, civic, educational and cultural groups or organizations on an equitable basis, regardless of the beliefs or affiliations of individuals or groups requesting their use.

The Library's meeting rooms are available during normal operating hours. Official government business by federal, state, county or municipal governments may use the meeting rooms as needed. The meeting rooms are available at no charge for use by non-profit, civic, educational and cultural groups or organizations. Outside organizations may reserve rooms up to three months in advance with a maximum of four bookings per month by a single organization.

The branch manager, according to the following priorities, will approve requests for use of the rooms:
1. Library-sponsored or related meetings and programs;
2. Government-sponsored or related meetings and activities; and
3. Community groups as described above.

Regular library service takes precedence over all other activities and the use of the meeting rooms must not interfere with the operation of the library. Library meeting rooms are intended to serve the community in its broadest sense.

Only library-related groups and other government departments and agencies, either sponsoring or co-sponsoring a program, may charge an admission fee or a sell a product. A percentage, to be determined by the Charleston Friends of the Library, of the admission or product's revenue is subject to be collected and donated to the Friends to benefit the Library.

All meetings or programs must be open to the public. No alcohol may be served in County buildings.

The name, address and phone number of the Library may not be used as the official address of any organization using the meeting rooms, nor may any non-library group using the meeting rooms publicize its activities in such a way as to imply library sponsorship.

The branch manager reserves the right to refuse the use of the rooms whenever, in the branch manager's best judgment, the use does not conform to this policy.

Meeting Room Procedures for the Main Library and Regional Libraries 
I. Use of the meeting room must be in compliance with the CCPL Meeting Room Use Policy and Code of Conduct, as well as all applicable federal, state and local laws.

II. Parking availability may be limited. Parking under the garage beneath the Main Library is free for the first hour; and $.50 per half-hour subsequent to that.

III. Applicant must be a Charleston County resident or taxpayer 18 years of age or older and should leave a phone number that can be given to patrons requesting information about the group's meeting. Out-of-county library card holders are also eligible to use a meeting room.

IV. No material of any kind may be posted directly on the wall of the meeting room or in the halls.

V. No smoking or use of tobacco products is allowed inside any library facility. 

VI. All meetings must be held during regular library hours: 

Regional Libraries: Mon.-Thur. 10 a.m.- 8 p.m.; Fri.-Sat. 10 a.m.- 6 p.m.

Main Library: Mon.-Thur. 9 a.m.- 8 p.m.; Fri.-Sat. 9 a.m.- 6 p.m.; Sun. 2-5 p.m.

Meetings must end and rooms must be empty and returned to original condition 15 minutes prior to closing.

VII. The library does not provide staff, porter, or cleaning service for meetings. 

VIII. The applicant must accept responsibility for safety, order and condition of the room. The applicant's responsibility for the room shall be terminated only when they have informed an authorized staff member or that they have vacated the room and that it is ready to be secured.

IX. The library is not responsible for items left in its facilities. Storage space is not available.

X. Meetings involving minors must be supervised by adults and reservation requests signed by an adult.

XI. With prior approval, light refreshments are permitted. Alcoholic beverages are not allowed. At Main, a deposit is required for use of kitchen or for serving refreshments. Payable by check to the Charleston County Public Library, a deposit of $25.00 is required for the meeting rooms, and a deposit of $50.00 is required for the auditorium. If the room is left in satisfactory condition, the deposit will be returned by the next working day.

XII. The library reserves the right to cancel reservations for reasons dealing with unexpected library needs or purposes.

XIII. The library director is authorized to revoke this agreement at any time.

XIV. Noncompliance with these requirements may result in denial of future requests for use of meeting rooms.



What is InstantFlix?

 
InstantFlix is a web streaming movie service that offers thousands of award-winning shorts, feature films and documentaries by independent filmmakers. Founded by filmmakers, 
InstantFlix curates the best from film festivals worldwide.

The 
InstantFlix service is always available for an unlimited number of users. Many films can be shown on your computer, tablet, TV, Roku or Xbox streaming devices.

Films available through 
InstantFlix are not rated by the Motion Picture Association of America, so viewer discretion is advised.

How to set up your account: 
 
You need an email address and a valid CCPL card number.


Zinio Users: use your Zinio email address and password to log in to the library 
InstantFlix Collection.

To start a new account: 

  • Create a library InstantFlix account (to authorize your access)
  • Click "Create New Account," then enter your library card number and click the "Next" button.
  • Enter your email address and create a password, then click "Create Account."
  • This also creates your account at InstantFlix.com.
Wednesday program: The Civil Rights Act

The Civil Rights Act of 1964: A 50th Anniversary Review

Wednesday, February 19 at 6 p.m.
Charleston County Main Library, Auditorium - 68 Calhoun Street: 805-6930

Half a century has passed since the U.S. Congress passed a landmark law to prohibit discrimination against racial, ethnic, national, and religious minorities, and women. Please join CCPL's historian, Dr. Nic Butler, for a conversation with Civil Rights veteran and Lowcountry legend, William "Bill" Saunders, about how far our community has come since the ratification of the 1964 law.

For more information, call 805-6930.

Maps/Festival Info


Parking

There are a limited number of free parking spaces in a lot across Charlotte Street from the Festival's Wragg Square entrance. Vehicles should enter the lot on Henrietta Street, which runs between 334 Meeting Street and Citadel Square Baptist Church. On Saturday, attendees can get special $5 flat rate parking at the Charleston Visitors' Center Garage off Meeting Street and the Gaillard Garage across from the Charleston County Public Library. To get this discount, please pick up a Parking Voucher at the Ticket Tent. You must present this to the Parking Garage Attendant. 

Handicapped Parking
Free, designated handicapped parking is available in the Second Presbyterian Church Parking Lot on Elizabeth Street. A sidewalk connects this lot to the park. There are a limited number of free parking spaces in the lot on Henrietta Street, which runs between the building at 334 Meeting Street and Citadel Square Baptist Church. Vehicles should enter the lot on Henrietta Street, between Elizabeth and Meeting streets.  

Downtown Transportation
The Downtown Area Shuttle (DASH) provides free transportation around downtown Charleston. There is a DASH shuttle stop on Meeting Street near the entrance to Wragg Square.

Visitor Information
The Charleston Visitors' Center is just a block north of Wragg Square on Meeting Street. Staff at the center can help visitors with information and assist with getting tickets or reservations for local activities, attractions, restaurants and lodging. You also can call the Charleston Area Convention and Visitors' Bureau at 843-853-8000.

Seating
The best way to guarantee a good seat for a performance is to arrive early and sit in the seats desired. If you are being joined by companions, they should be in their seats at least five minutes before the performance starts. At that point, all empty seats will be open for any festival guest. Although it is tempting, please don't save groups of seats by placing coats, tote bags or other items on chairs. Tent monitors will clear items off chairs between performances.

Restrooms
Portable restrooms, including facilities that are handicapped accessible, are available within Wragg Square along the Charlotte Street side of the park.

Food
During the day Saturday, Charlotte Street will close, and three food trucks will have a variety of food and drinks available from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Dulce will provide a variety of sweets and beverages, starting at 9 a.m.,  plus Hello My Name is BBQ and Geechee Island will offer lunch-time treats, starting at 11 a.m. A description of each vendor is on the next page. For those wanting to visit a restaurant, a map of restaurants and coffee houses within walking distance is available in the Festival's Ticket Tent.

Festival Photography
Professional photographers will take publicity pictures of different performances during the Festival. The Charleston County Public Library also is videotaping some performances. If you do not want your photo published, please let the Tent Manager or Tent Monitor know.

Limited Public Photography, No Video or Audio Recording
Audio recording and videotaping are prohibited during the festival, except by authorized media representatives and festival staff. Photography for personal use is permitted, but flash should not be used and nothing should be done to distract the performers or fellow listeners.

Safety/First Aid
If you have an emergency, please contact the nearest Charleston Tells staff member or a representative at the Ticket Tent as soon as possible. First Aid is available at the Ticket Tent. On Saturday, personnel from Charleston County Emergency Medical Services will be on site. Additionally, please make sure all children under age 12 remain with a parent or guardian at all times.

Credit Cards Accepted
Visa, MasterCard, Discover and American Express are accepted at both the Registration and Marketplace tents.

Trash and Recyclables
Please help us keep the park clean by picking up your trash and disposing of it in the marked receptacles. Water bottles and aluminum cans should be put in the containers marked for recycling. Thank you.

Pets
Pets are not allowed in the park during the festival. The only exception is guide dogs for the handicapped.

No Alcohol/Smoking
Alcoholic beverages and smoking are not allowed in the park. No exceptions.

Lost and Found
Lost items can be turned in and reclaimed at the Registration Tent.

 Contest Rules
  • The contest is open to Charleston County residents and any CCPL cardholder, ages 13 or over. 
  • Entries will be accepted from individuals or pairs. 
  • Entries should be original short videos or original essays explaining why the entrant wants to participate in the workshop, why they want to share a story and how they think the workshop will help them preserve and share stories in the future.
    • Videos should not exceed 2 minutes and must be done in a format accepted by YouTube.
    • Essays should not exceed 500 words.
  • All entries must be personal, not promotional, in nature.
  • Entries must be postmarked by December 31, 2014. Late entries will not be accepted. 

NOTE: By entering, the applicant acknowledges that - if chosen as a winner - they will be available to attend a three-day workshop held by The Center for Digital Storytelling scheduled January 22-24, 2015, from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. daily at the Charleston County Main Library, 68 Calhoun Street, Charleston.

Submission Guidelines:
  • Submissions must be your own original creation and must not infringe on any third party rights. No copyrighted music, video or images may be used in submissions without appropriate prior permission, and signed permission giving the applicant permission must be included with the contest submission. Entrants are responsible for obtaining and submitting all necessary permissions.
  • Submissions must not contain violence, profanity, sexually explicit images or ideas, libel and/or direct attacks on individuals or organizations. Entries should not invade privacy, reveal other people's personal information (without supplying written consent with the entry) or display predatory behavior. Submissions must not contain material that promotes intolerance, harassment, intimidation, racism, hatred or harm against any group, individual, or organization or promote discrimination based on race, gender, religion, nationality, disability, sexual orientation or age. Submissions must be appropriate for all ages. CCPL reserves the right, at its sole discretion, to disqualify and delete any entry deemed to be offensive, inappropriate, derogatory and libelous, or not in keeping with the completion theme or that is otherwise not in compliance with the official contest rules.
  • Participants grant CCPL a perpetual royalty-free license to copy, distribute, modify, display and perform publicly and otherwise use, and authorize others to use, your product for any educational purposes.
  • Participants must be 13 or older.
  • Participants are ineligible if directly related to anyone on the contest's panel of judges, if they work for CCPL or have a family member who works for CCPL. By participating, entrants agree to be bound by the Contest Rules. 
Judging Criteria:

All eligible submissions will be scored by an external committee of judges based on the following criteria:
  • Theme
  • Creativity/Originality/Uniqueness of story
  • Storytelling/Emotional Value
Winner Notification and Announcement:

Contest winners will be notified by email and/or telephone by January 12 and may be requested to complete documents required by workshop presenters. A total of 10 winning entries will be selected, each submitted by an individual or pair. 

Winners will attend a three-day custom workshop created and run by the Center for Digital Storytelling scheduled for January 22-24, 2015 from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. at the Charleston County Main Library. At the workshop, participants will learn about digital storytelling, script writing, image preparation, voiceover recording, editing, rough story edits and final story edits. 

The winners' professionally produced stories shown at a premiere at the Charleston County Main Library Friday on March 5, 2015 and will be shown at the Charleston Tells Storytelling Festival, March 13-14, 2015, at Wragg Square. Winners will receive tickets to the Festival.

For more information, contact Kimberly Bowlin at whatiwantyoutoknow@ccpl.org or 843-805-6884

Divergent Synopsis

Divergent is the first in a trilogy of dystopian thrillers filled with electrifying decisions, heartbreaking betrayals, stunning consequences and unexpected romance.

Set in futuristic Chicago, citizens live in a society divided into five factions where residents have distinct beliefs, passions and loyalties. Residents must follow the laws and uphold the virtues of their faction: Abnegation, The Selfless; Amity, The Peaceful; Candor, The Honest; Dauntless, The Brave; and Erudite, The Intelligent.

At 16, each resident takes an aptitude test to determine which faction best matches their talents, skills and beliefs. With this information, the teens must decide whether to remain with their family or move to a new faction where people have similar values.

Told from the perspective of 16-year-old protagonist Beatrice Prior, the decision is made more difficult when she discovers that she is an anomaly and does not fit into any single group. Forced to choose, she ultimately makes a choice that surprises everyone, including herself.

When joining a faction, Beatrice must complete a highly competitive initiation process or face the possibility of being factionless, having no home and no sanctioned purpose in life.

During initiation, Beatrice renames herself Tris and struggles alongside her fellow initiates to live out the choice they have made. Together, they undergo extreme tests of endurance and intense psychological simulations, some with devastating consequences. Transformed by the initiation, Tris searches to discover her friends and figure out who she can trust.

But, Tris also has a secret, one she's kept hidden from everyone because she's been warned it can mean death. And as she discovers a growing conflict that threatens to unravel her seemingly perfect society, she realizes her secret might help save the lives of those she loves ... or it might destroy her.

 

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Are you looking for a good book to read? Does your book club need help getting started? Just what was the name of that book you read five years ago? Take advantage of your reader's advisory services at the Charleston County Public Library and we will help in these areas and much more. 

Search online for your next book.



Get started with hoopla

Get started with hoopla, a digital service that allows you to borrow e-books, audio books, music, movies, TV shows and comics with your Charleston County Public Library card.

hoopla offers access to the following materials:

  • Check out up to 10 items per calendar month.
  • Check out movies and TV shows for 3 days.
  • Check out music albums for 1 week.
  • Check out eBooks, comics and audio books for 3 weeks.
  • There's no need to place holds; all titles are always available.
  • Apps are available for viewing/reading/listening on mobile devices. 
  • Kids Mode is available for browsing content designed for children.

Get started:

  • Click here, or click on the hoopla logo on the CCPL Downloadable Media page.
  • Click on "Log In" in the upper-left corner.
  • Click on "Sign Up Now" under "New to hoopla?"
  • Select "Charleston County Public Library"
  • Provide a personal email address, a password of your choosing, and your Charleston County Public Library card number to complete the process.
  • Using a portable device? Download the free app, and sign up from there. If you have already signed up, just log in on your device through the app.

Set up Kids Mode or change "my hoopla" settings:

  • Log into hoopla.
  • In the upper right corner, look for your log in name (your email address).
  • Click on it, and gain access to your settings. The option to enable Kids Mode, a feature designed to show content deemed suitable for those up to age 12, is at the top of the setting options.
  • Scroll to the bottom, and click on "Update" to save any changes.

Questions? 
If you need assistance with hoopla, call 843-805-6930, email AskAQuestion@ccpl.org or explore hoopla "Help."

One Book Charleston County: Divergent Discussion Questions


1.

What purpose does each of the five factions serve in society? What personality types are drawn toward each faction? Do you think these factions represent every basic personality type and fulfill all the basic needs of people? If not, what faction(s) would you create to fill in any gaps?

2.

What was the reason behind the creation of the factions? Do you think the factions are working "toward a better society and a better world" (p. 44) as they say they are? What about the structure seems to be working for Tris's society? What doesn't seem to be working at all? 

3.

What faction do you think you would have been born into, given your family and its values? Which faction would you select at your Choosing Ceremony? Why? How would you feel about making a decision that would determine your life's course at the age of sixteen? 

4.

What choices have you made that have changed you? What future choices will you also make, and how do you think that they will change you?

5.

How does the idea of "faction before blood" come into play throughout the book? Do you think this idea has a place in today's society, or is it contrary to what most people believe? In our society, what ideas and beliefs are people loyal to in the way Tris's society is loyal to the concept of the factions?

6.

Why is Tris's government run only by members of Abnegation? Do you think this is a good idea? Do you agree with her father's statement that "valuing knowledge above all else results in a lust for power, and that leads men into dark and empty places" (p. 35)? Why or why not?

7.

What does it mean to be factionless in Tris's society? How does a person become factionless?

8.

Tris says about Candor, "It must require bravery to be honest all the time" (p. 62). Do you agree? Which do you think is a braver faction, Dauntless or Candor? Would you like to live in a society like Candor, where everyone tells the truth no matter how hard it is to hear?

9.

During initiation, is it selfish of Tris to crave victory, or is it brave? Do Tris's friends have a right to be jealous when she's ranked above them? If you were Tris, would you forgive them for their reactions?

10.

How does initiation change and transform Tris? Do you think she made the right faction choice? How do you think she might have changed if she had chosen one of the other factions?

11.

What is the difference between being fearless and learning to control your fears? Do you believe anyone can be truly fearless? What does Tris mean when she says that "half of bravery is perspective" (p. 458)? 

12.

Is Four's desire to be "brave, and selfless, and smart, and kind, and honest" (p. 405) realistic in the society in which he lives? Think of examples of people in our own world who successfully bridge different cultures, perspectives, or ways of living.

13.

Tris's mom says, "Human beings as a whole cannot be good for long before the bad creeps back in and poisons us again" (p. 441). Do you agree or disagree? Why? 

14.

At the beginning of the book, Tris does not understand what it means to be Divergent. How do you think she would explain it by the end of the book?

 back 

 

Dixie Highway Book Talk at Main
Library architects seek input for new branches

CHARLESTON COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY
FOR RELEASE - September 2, 2015

Library architects seek input for new branches

The public has spoken, but we need to hear more. In November, Charleston County Public Library asked residents if they wanted to pay to build new libraries and renovate existing ones. You approved the proposal by nearly 3-to-1, telling us just how important you feel libraries are and that you want more.

It's now time to get down to the nitty gritty. Architects are developing a plan that lists what kind of spaces and services should be in each of the five new buildings, and they need your input. Five public meetings are set so residents living near the planned new buildings can tell architects what they want in the new libraries and what kind of services and technologies should be in the children's area, the reference area, meeting rooms, study rooms, display areas, etc. It's your neighborhood library, and we want to know what you consider the top priorities.

Charleston County Public Library should reflect our community and have buildings that will take us into the future. Attend any of these meetings, and help us make that happen.


Meeting dates/locations:

Monday, September 14 at 7 p.m.
New St. Paul's Branch Library (Replaces St. Paul's/Hollywood Branch)
E.B. Ellington Elementary Cafeteria
5540 Old Jacksonboro Rd., Ravenel 


Thursday, September 17 at 7 p.m.
New West Ashley/Bees Ferry Branch Library
West Ashley High School Auditorium
4060 West Wildcat Blvd., Charleston


Monday, September 21 at 7 p.m.
New Pinehaven Branch Library (Replaces Cooper River Memorial Branch)
Cooper River Memorial Branch
3503 Rivers Ave., North Charleston


Monday, September 28 at 7 p.m.
New Mt. Pleasant/Carolina Park Branch Library
Wando High School Cafeteria
1000 Warrior Way, Mt. Pleasant


Thursday, October 1 at 7 p.m.
New James Island Branch Library (Replaces James Island Branch)
James Island Elementary School Media Center
1872 Grimball Road, Charleston 

Voters approved a referendum to spend $108.5 million to build five new branch libraries, renovate 13 existing branches and move support services out of the Main Library to free up more space for the public. A major focus includes upgrading technology by adding self check-out kiosks, more public computers and the latest equipment in public meeting rooms.

Charleston County has hired Charleston-based architectural firm Cummings & McCrady Inc. to oversee this planning phase. Several other architectural firms are involved, including library-planning specialists McMillan Pazden Smith from Greenville. 

To learn more about the construction and renovation plan, view a map and see a breakdown of the estimated costs, 
click here. Residents unable to attend a meeting can send comments to letusknow@ccpl.org.


North Charleston Arts Festival Events
Cooper River Library emergency closing

The Cooper River Memorial Library is closing for the remainder of the day due a power outage.  5/30/2014  

I Want To Tell You: Storytelling Contest
 Workshop Designed to Help Residents Record and Preserve Memories

Entry Form     External Release Form 
Do you have a compelling story to share, but don't know what to do or how to get started? Be part of a groundbreaking, three-day workshop featuring the internationally renowned Center for Digital Storytelling, and learn how to use today's technology to preserve your personal stories and those of others.

Hosted by Charleston County Public Library from Jan. 22-24, 2015, at the Main Library in downtown Charleston, this free workshop will teach attendees about script writing, image preparation, voiceover recording and story editing.

Due to extremely limited space, participants will be selected through a contest. To enter, individuals or pairs must submit a video or written essay explaining why they want to participate in the workshop, why they want to share their story and how they think the workshop will help them preserve and share stories in the future.

Entries can be either: 
  • A video, maximum two minutes, uploadaed to YouTube or copied and sent on a DVD. Videos uploaded to YouTube should be tagged CCPL Contest - I Want To Tell You with your name and the title of your entry.
  • A written essay, maximum 500 words.
Entries must be postmarked by Jan. 9, 2015. 
  • Video links and essays can be emailed to IWantToTellYou@ccpl.org or 
  • Entries can be mailed to Kimberly Bowlin, Charleston County Public Library, 68 Calhoun Street, Charleston SC 29401. 
All entries MUST include signed copies of the official Entry and Release Form, which is available on the library's website - www.ccpl.org.

An external panel of judges will select a maximum of 10 individuals or pairs to attend the training. Winners will be announced by January 14. Entrants must agree to attend the full, three-day workshop, if selected.

The final workshop product with the participants' stories will be featured during a special premiere prior to the 2015 Charleston Tells Storytelling Festival, and their videos will be screened during the Festival set for March 13-14, 2015. Participants also will receive tickets to the Festival along with a copy of their final story, either electronically or on DVD.

Since 1998, the Center for Digital Storytelling has worked with nearly 1,000 organizations around the world and trained more than 15,000 people on how to use today's technology to produce and preserve their personal stories. The Center discovered that people with little or no experience in multimedia can produce powerful personal stories with the modern technology they already have - like a smart phone or tablet.

This workshop is the kickoff of a 10-month project by CCPL to promote storytelling and encourage area residents to preserve stories for future generations. Additional events and activities will be announced soon. 

Presented by CCPL and the Charleston Tells Storytelling Festival, the workshop is made possible by funding by a Library Services and Technology Act grant from the Institute of Library and Museum Services administered by the South Carolina State Library.

 

Tellabration - A Storytelling Celebration

Tellabration offers a day of free, magical storytelling on Saturday

Take part in this annual worldwide event as families of all types and sizes gather on six continents this day to hear stories, share laughter and enjoy the art of storytelling. Activities are planned at four CCPL branches. Tellabration is a great way to learn more about the art of storytelling in advance of the annual Charleston Tells Storytelling Festival set for March 14-15, 2014, in Wragg Square in downtown Charleston. Charleston Tells is presented by Charleston County Public Library.

Seven Sensational Stories
Otranto Road Regional Library at 11 a.m.
Storyteller Tim Lowry spins seven world folk tales in his signature style. Perfect for children, Lowry's animated stories feature whimsical vocals and audience participation.     

The Telling Drum 
John's Island Regional Library at 2 p.m.
Come join storyteller Julian Gooding.    

Tales in the Afternoon (ages 4 and older)
Mt. Pleasant Regional Library at 2:30 p.m.
Enjoy Claire Willett's collection of puppets and stories about diverse cultures and a variety of animals.    

Now Hear This
St. Andrews Regional Library at 3 p.m.
Listen to Minerva King share great, sometimes slightly embellished stories based on historical figures and events.      
 

 


 

 
      
     
Julian Gooding   Claire Willett   Minverva King   Tim Lowry  

 

   Like our Facebook page for information on upcoming storytelling events.

Sponsors

Presented in partnership with the Charleston Area Professional Storytellers and the S.C. Storytelling Network. SCSN is funded in part by a grant from the S.C. Arts Commission, which receives support from the National Endowment for the Arts.

 

 

 
   
   
Project CHALENG meeting Sept. 28
Hack the Holidays Workshops
Criminal Justice Reform: A Panel Discussion
Pride and Prejudice Discussion
Family celebrates life of Cynthia Hurd

Press Statement
From the family of Cynthia Graham Hurd
June 19, 2015
 

Media Contact:
Jamie Thomas, Charleston County Public Library’s PR/Marketing Manager 
843-364-2030 
 

Charleston shooting victim loved community and serving others

Charleston, S.C. - Although burdened with grief at their loss and overwhelmed with questions about Wednesday’s shooting at Mother Emanuel AME Church, the family of lifelong Charleston resident Cynthia Graham Hurd said they are finding some solace in knowing that she spent her last moments at a place she loved so well.

Photos of Hurd from her family and library are available through this Dropbox link.

Memorial fund created at library.


Mother Emanuel AME Church is the family’s church, according to Hurd’s brother Malcolm Graham. Their mother sang in the choir, and all the children joined the church at a young age.

“We’re struggling, but we get strength from where she was last – the church. She was at the place that gave her the most peace and satisfaction. She spiritually grew up at Emanuel, so that she would be there in her last moments gives the family some strength and comfort,” Graham said Friday – two days after a single gunman entered the church, sat with members during a bible study and then opened fire – shooting and killing nine.

Born in Charleston, Hurd went to downtown Charleston schools, graduated from Clark Atlanta University and the self-proclaimed book nerd returned to Charleston and began working for Charleston County Public Library in 1984. After receiving her masters in Library Information Sciences, she moved up in the organization to become manager of the John L. Dart Library in 1990 and help residents in the very community where she grew up.

“She was always a book nerd, always a very smart young lady, and she loved reading from a very young age,” Graham said. She loved her job and really loved helping people, especially kids, he said.

After 31 years with the library, she touched the lives of thousands of people in the community – encouraging children during their earliest days as new readers and then watching them grow as they came to the library to work on homework assignments, then fill out college and job applications and, ultimately, return to the library with children of their own.

“She was a librarian’s librarian,” Graham said. “She enjoyed working with the kids, but she also realized her job extended beyond the walls of the library. She helped them discover themselves and learn skills that gave them the ability to live and grow, but she also was there to help people work through their problems. It went beyond just checking out books and helping people find jobs; she was there for people throughout the community who sought her advice on a variety of issues.”

“Although she had no children, she had a community full of children. She helped them discover ways to help themselves and learn skills that would give them the ability to live and grow and make lives for themselves,” he said. “She was kind of like the Dr. Phil of the Dart Library and for that downtown Charleston community.”

In 2011, Hurd earned a promotion that would make her manager of the St. Andrews Regional Library, one of the busiest branches in CCPL’s 16 library system. He said his sister was hesitant because she didn’t want to lose the relationships she had developed with the kids in the neighborhood around the Dart Library, but she knew this was an opportunity to stretch her wings.

“I’m trying to find a silver lining in this, but I can’t. This is the time where we rely on our faith, so there must be an answer, but right now the family is surrounded by grief. It is a traumatic loss that we feel, and the family is searching for understanding in a situation where there doesn’t seem to be any,” Graham said.

Hurd is survived by her husband Steve along with five siblings - Robert Moultrie, Gilbert Moultrie, Melvin Graham Jr., Malcolm Graham and Averill “Jackie” Graham Jones - and a host of nieces, nephews and cousins throughout the community. She was the daughter of Melvin and Henrietta Graham, both deceased.

After attending James Simmons Elementary School and the High School of Charleston, she went to Clark Atlanta University before getting her masters in Library Information Sciences from the University of South Carolina. She was always active in the community, serving as a member of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Inc., the Charleston Housing Authority and even working part-time at the College of Charleston’s Addlestone Library.

“She loved her family. She loved her community. She loved the library, and she loved life,” he said.

--------------------------------------------

Making Donations
For those wanting to make a donation in memory of Hurd and her lifelong service to the community as a librarian, the family asks that donations be made to the Charleston County Public Library with the funds going to the John L. Dart Branch and the St. Andrews Regional Library for literacy, outreach and educational programming. Donations can be sent to the Charleston County Public Library c/o the Cynthia Graham Hurd Memorial Fund, 68 Calhoun Street, Charleston, S.C. Donations also are accepted electronically via PayPal. 

 
 
 
Online Training via lynda.com

Charleston County residents now can access thousands of free online courses and more than 130,000 video tutorials to learn new skills that can help them reach both personal and professional goals.  

The site - lynda.com - is normally available to individuals only through paid subscriptions, but Charleston County residents now can access this diverse educational site through CCPL's website. All they need is their library card number and password.  

Classes on the site includes topics like business, design, web development, multimedia skills plus individual software products like Microsoft Office, Adobe Creative Suite and open source applications.

lynda.com uses expert instructors and offers searchable transcripts of courses to make it easy to find answers and information about specific questions. The site also offers Certificates of Completion that are uploaded to an individual's LinkedIn profile when a course is completed. Many courses also feature course exercises to give the user practice. For example, a Microsoft Excel class may include a downloadable pre-populated spreadsheet to help users watching the tutorial.

To get started, visit the lynda.com link from the library's website, and enter your library card number. You will be asked to create a password. The password cannot be changed, so it is important that you create one you can remember. You will be prompted to create an account with your name and an email address. This lets you keep up with the status of your course history, playlists, bookmarks and Certificates of Completion. 

Please bookmark the library's login page to lynda.com for easy return access. Your library login will not work on the sites public subscription login page or on the company's mobile apps. For those wanting to use a mobile device, you will need to access the site through your web browser. The company's mobile apps only recognize individual subscribers, not subscriptions through libraries.

Need more help, check out this Getting Started page for lynda.com. 

Other Subscription Resources at CCPL 
lynda.com is one of the dozens of online subscription
databases available to library cardholders. Other popular online, electronic resources include:

  • Learning Express Library - a learning platform that includes practice tests and study materials for GED/TASC, SAT and other examinations;
  • Gale Virtual Reference Library - a collection of research titles in the following subject areas: Biography, Business, Education, History, Law, Literature, Medicine, Multicultural Studies, Nation and World, Religion, Science, and Social Science; and
  • Mango Languages - a learning site that includes courses in 52 languages plus 17 courses for those learning English.

To browse the full list of online databases and resources, visit, CCPL's Research Tools page.

 

Main Library to close Wednesday at 1 p.m.

The Main Library will close at 1 p.m. on Wednesday, August 26 due to air conditioning failure. The library's book drops will remain open during this time, and the branch intends to reopen to the public on Thursday, August 27 at 9 a.m.  

Poe Library to reopen November 30

The Poe/Sullivan's Island library branch is scheduled to reopen Monday, November 30. The branch has been closed for cleanup and repair since receiving water damage from the rain and extreme flooding last month. 

Programs scheduled prior to November 30 have been rescheduled, and book drops remain locked while the branch is closed. Hold requests scheduled for pick up at Poe/Sullivan's Island are available at the Mt. Pleasant Regional Library, and customers can return materials to any of the other CCPL locations before November 30.

Fun Fall Family Events

Throughout November
Giving Thanks to Our Veterans
Mt. Pleasant Regional Library
In support of the Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center in Charleston, items such as ground coffee, CARTA one-day bus passes, reading glasses and more will be collected for donation to the Center. Patrons can pick up a list of desired items at the Information Desk for more information. 

Holiday Recipe Swap (adults)
St. Andrews Regional Library
Exchange your favorite holiday recipes with other great cooks.

Friday, November 21
Crafternoon - Stuffed Apple Stitching
Poe/Sullivan’s Island Branch Library from 3-5 p.m.
Create beautiful, handmade apple ornaments.

Saturday, November 22
Play with Dad: Saturday Stories
James Island Branch Library at 10:30 a.m.
Enjoy storytime with your dad or another favorite loved one. 

Stuffed Apple Stitching
Poe/Sullivan’s Island Branch Library at 10:30 a.m.
Create beautiful, handmade apple ornaments. 

Make-it Take-it Craft 
Main Library at 11 a.m.
Drop in for a fun morning of seasonal crafts. 

STAR Therapy Dogs (ages 11 and younger)
St. Andrews Regional Library at 11 a.m.
Make a furry friend, and read a book with your new pal. Certified therapy dogs and their handlers love a good story.

Thanksgiving Anticipation
Edisto Branch Library at 11 a.m.
Listen to a Thanksgiving story, and make a decoration for your table. 

Turkey Tales and Turkey Tails
McClellanville Branch Library at 11 a.m.
Enjoy Thanksgiving stories and crafts. 

The Feast Day of St. Cecilia, Patron Saint of Music
Mt. Pleasant Regional Library at 12 p.m.
Charleston has celebrated the Feast Day of St. Cecilia on November 22 with music and poetry since 1737. Our St. Cecilia Society also was the first musical organization in America. So who was St. Cecilia, and why is she associated with music? Join CCPL's musicologist, Dr. Nic Butler, for an illustrated tour of the saint's history in Charleston. 

Saturday Craft and Storytime
St. Paul’s/Hollywood Branch Library from 12-2 p.m.
Listen to Marsh Music by Marianne Berkes, and make a fun craft. 

Lego Club (ages 4 and older)
Mt. Pleasant Regional Library from 2-3 p.m.
What can you build with library Legos? 

Reading is the Name of the Game
John L. Dart Library from 2-5 p.m.
Play games, do puzzles and build something with Legos. 

Monday, November 24
Family Stretch Time
John L. Dart Library at 10:30 a.m.
Enjoy a relaxing stretch class. No experience required. 

Memoir Writing Circle (adults)
Poe/Sullivan’s Island Branch Library at 10:30 a.m.
Come, write and share your stories for fun and feedback. 

Zumba with Mary
St. Andrews Regional Library at 11:30 a.m.
Enjoy an hour of fitness, fun and great music.  

Knit and Stitch (teens and adults)
West Ashley Branch Library at 6:30 p.m.
Want to know more about knitting or share your knowledge? Meet and exchange ideas with other crafters. All skill levels welcome. 

Tuesday, November 25
Crafternoon
John L. Dart Library at 1 p.m.
Have fun, and make a turkey craft. 

Native American Heritage Month Series (ages 6-12)
John’s Island Regional Library at 5:30 p.m.
Celebrate rich and diverse cultures, traditions and histories, and acknowledge the important contributions of Native people through stories, crafts and food. 

Wednesday, November 26
Thanksgiving Story and Craft
Mt. Pleasant Regional Library at 10:30 a.m.
Listen to a story, and make a Thanksgiving craft. 

Saturday, November 29
Fold and Paste Treat Boxes
(ages 11 and younger)
James Island Branch Library at 10:30 a.m.
Create a gift box to fill for the upcoming holidays. 

Pinwheels
Poe/Sullivan’s Island Branch Library at 10:30 a.m.
Capture the fall breezes with your own pretty pinwheel. 

Lego Fun (ages 11 and younger)
St. Andrews Regional Library at 11 a.m.
Come play with Legos, Lego Duplos and friends in the meeting room. 

Countdown to Christmas
McClellanville Branch Library at 11 a.m.
Count down the days to Christmas with your own paper chain. 

Recycled CD Crafts
John L. Dart Library at 1 p.m. 
Bring your creativity, and make something awesome out of recycled CDs.

Main Library Reopening Tuesday

The Main Library's air conditioning is fixed. We will be back open on Tuesday at 9 a.m. The Children's Piccolo Spoleto Robert Ivey Ballet has been moved back to the Main Library's Auditorium. 

The Board meeting scheduled for Tuesday will still be moved to St. Andrews at 6:15 p.m.

 

 

Delayed opening on Tuesday

Charleston County Public Library branches will have a delayed opening on Tuesday due to the potential of hazardous weather and road conditions. Branches will open at 10:30 a.m., and library staff will report at 10 a.m. We will reopen at regular time on Wednesday. If there are any changes, it will be announced through the news media, on the library’s website and on the library’s Facebook page.  

Read for the Record: October 22


Read for the Record Storytime
Jumpstart's Read for the Record aims to bring children and adults together to read the same book, on the same day, in homes and communities all over the world. Enjoy listening to Not Norman: A Goldfish Story by Kelly Bennett. 
 
Thursday, October 22
Edisto Library, 9 a.m. 






Presbyterian Church on Edisto Island Kindergarten, 11:30 a.m.




Lt. Flipper's Trial: A One-Act play
Board Meeting moved to St. Andrews

The Board meeting scheduled for Tuesday, May 27 has been moved to 
St. Andrews Regional Library and will begin at 6:15 p.m.

Board packet


John's Island program looks at island history

Whether a John’s Island native or just an occasional visitor to the area, Charleston County Public Library offers insight to a visual history of John's Island through a free screening of the short film John's Island: A Moment in Time, at John’s Island Regional Library, 3531 Maybank Highway, at 4 p.m. Saturday, April 27.

Through a combination of research, observation and outreach that began two years ago, members of Kiawah Island Photography Club documented the history of John’s island from its early stages to the present. A project that originated with the goal of producing a visual history evolved into a video with narrative and music, along with a published book of photographs that illustrate the island’s culture, diverse population and topography. Copies of this book were presented to five John's Island public schools and John’s Island Regional Library.

"We have come to know and respect all that is Johns Island and are grateful to have met its people with whom we share so much more than a zip code," said David Elliott, of Kiawah Island Photography Club. "We discovered a place that is unique in so many ways … the kindest, most generous of people, the most interesting history, housing of every type and size, dense swamps and beautiful river vistas. Along the way, we developed a special place in our hearts for the place and its people."

Kiawah Island Photography Club members will discuss the film and the accompanying book after the screening. Proceeds from book sales are donated to the Barrier Islands Free Medical Clinic on Maybank Highway.

         
 
 
CCPL can help with 2015 resolutions

It's the time of year when people reflect on last year and set goals or resolutions for the coming year. With CCPL, you don't have to go it alone. The library is filled with resources to help you meet your goals to learn new skills, spend more time with family, save money and get better organized in 2015. Check out this list of some common New Year's Resolutions and how the library can help.

Be a smart spender.
Access Consumer Reports magazine and buying guides free online through the 
MasterFILE Premier* database and get tips that will help you spend and save wisely. Once you’ve logged into MasterFILE Premier, use quote marks around the magazine title to find current and past issues.

Spend more time with family and friends.
Musical performances, plays, operas, movies, art exhibits and storytimes are just some of the approximately 500 free programs offered monthly at a CCPL branch. Check out our Programs and Events listing each month.

Save money.
Take advantage of Value Line Research Center* and Morningstar Investment Center* to help you make informed investment decisions. Both databases are accessible from CCPL’s Business and Finance webpage.

Focus on health.
Get health, diet and exercise tips from the library’s online Health and Medicine databases and from consumer-oriented magazines within MasterFILE Premier and other online Magazines, Newspapers and Journals.

Read more.
Thousands of popular books are available to download free to your e-Reader or audio device. Check out our Downloadable Media page, and browse the titles available from OverDrive* and OneClickdigital* (audiobooks) to find the latest hot titles, as well as classics. For even more options, check out our CCPL’s Catalog.

Organize your home.
Magazines like Country Living, Better Homes and Gardens, HGTV Magazine and Martha Stewart Living are filled with organizational tips. Check out all the magazines available for free download through Zinio* on the library’s Downloadable Media page plus more consumer periodicals are available through MasterFILE Premier*.

Join a book club.
Checkout the list of upcoming book club discussion groups at various branches in the Programs and Events listing each month.

Learn a new language.
More than 60 languages are available through CCPL’s interactive online tool - Mango Languages*. Start now and be fluent by the time you take that summer vacation to a foreign country.

Learn new computer skills.
Brush up on your computer proficiency or learn how to use the latest mobile gadgets through free classes at your library. Check out this month’s list of classes and tech talks on our Computer Classes calendar.

Prepare for a test or a new job.
Boost your educational skills or prepare for a new career with the online LearningExpress Library*. Learn basic skills or take practice tests for high school, college and more than a dozen different career specialties. This is just one professional development resource available online under Careers and Education.

Experience great music.
Check out the hottest new artists, and download five songs free each week from the Freegal* music collection available on our Downloadable Media webpage.

 * Requires a library card to access from home or check out.     

 

   
   
North Charleston Arts Festival Events at CCPL

 

North Charleston Arts Festival
  May 4 - May 12, 2012

Cooper River Memorial, Dorchester Road Regional and Otranto Road Regional Libraries are hosting the following fabulous free events as part of the North Charleston Arts Festival. For more information on the North Charleston Arts Festival and a full listing of all of the scheduled events in various locations, please click here. 

 
   

 

Grey Seal Puppets presents A Show of Virtues
Tuesday, May 8 at 10:30 a.m.

Cooper River Memorial Library

Join Emmy Award nominee and 2007 UNIMA-USA Citation of Excellence winner, Grey Seal Puppets,for a puppet presentation inspired by The Children’s Book of Virtues. This entertaining and enlightening program features stories from around the world, including The Little Hero of Holland, The Tortoise and the Hare, and more. Audiences will be delighted as a traveling salesman transforms his sample case into a puppet stage and brings each story to life.

 
 
 

R&B from Byron Counts 
Tuesday, May 8 at 6:30 p.m.
Otranto Road Regional Library
Byron Counts
has over 20 years of experience as a singer, songwriter, producer, and engineer and has performed at a variety of regional events including the MOJA African American Arts Festival, 3 Rivers Music Festival, and The State Museum Jazz & Blues Festival. Counts will be performing a number of original R&B songs, including selections from his most recent album, What-Evah.


World Stories and Music
Wednesday, May 9 at 4 p.m.
Cooper River Memorial Library
Storyteller Julian Gooding will take audiences on a literary and interactive journey around the world through music and creative play. Children and adults are encouraged to take part in each story and become the characters or create mood and imagery with props and world percussion.

 

Folktales from Around the World
Wednesday, May 4 at 4 p.m.
Otranto Road Regional Library
Nationally renowned storyteller, TV host, and children’s book author, Bobby Norfolk, combines myths, folktales, legends, poetry and fairytales to create a celebration of cultural diversity in Folktales from Around the World!. This one-man theater/comedy performance dazzles with dynamic sound effects, silly mime and sprightly movement. Audience participation adds another dimension to this crowd-pleasing favorite.
 

Pirate Tales
Wednesday, May 9 at 4:30 p.m.
Dorchester Road Regional Library
Eric Lavender of Charleston Pirate Tours, along with his parrot, Captain Bob, present Charleston’s Golden Age of Piracy, featuring a bevy of pirate tales and interactive fun. This lively after school program includes telling of local pirate lore, ghost stories, an overview of Charleston’s pirate history, as well as balloon art, photos with Bob, and a little education on exotic birds.

     

 

Jazz and R&B Concert from Terence Young Thursday, May 10 at 6:30 p.m.
Dorchester Road Regional Library
Join celebrated smooth jazz guitarist, Terence Young, for an intimate evening performance featuring original songs from his newest CD, The Guitar Diary,  selections from his chart topping 2010 release, Love Stories, as well as beautifully arranged covers of R&B classics.

 


Gullah Stories
Saturday, May 12 at 11 a.m.
Otranto Road Regional Library

Nationally acclaimed storyteller and playwright, Sharon Cooper-Murray, also known as The Gullah Lady, will introduce audiences to the rich traditions of the Gullah culture through storytelling and song. Narration will be delivered in the Gullah language first, followed by the English translation.

 

Magic Show
Saturday, May 12 at 1 p.m.
Cooper River Memorial Library

Teen magic sensation, Brandon Wagster, presents classical stage magic with a modern twist. Performing and honing his skills of illusion since age 6, Brandon is currently 3rd in the world among teenage magicians and has garnered praise from huge names in magic, such as Lance Burton and Criss Angel. His show is full of magic, comedy, audience interaction, and fun – not to be missed!

 


 

Contemporary Dance Performance – Movin’ Into Math
Saturday
, May 12 at 2:30 p.m.
Dorchester Road Regional Library
Learn math through the creative choreography of this active learning contemporary dance performance. The Kinetyx Dance Ensemble will use movement to teach lessons on basic math skills such as division, multiplication, fractions, decimals, percents, and more. See how these skills are applied to choreograph dances.

 

 

 

Thursday program on race, social justice
Bryan Stevenson program TONIGHT. If you can't make it, check out the lecture via live streaming ... http://bit.ly/1RAmYGj 

Friends' Book Sale Schedule
 
2017 Book Sale Schedule

Mark your calendars! The Charleston Friends of the Library has upcoming book sales with great bargains and good books. All proceeds benefit the Charleston County Public Library. 

March 3-4 
Otranto Road Regional Library Book Sale
2261 Otranto Rd., 29406

June 23-25
Main Library Book Sale
68 Calhoun St., 29401

July 28-29
John's Island Regional Library Book Sale
3531 Maybank Hwy, 29455

October 13-15
That BIG Book Sale
Omar Shrine Auditorium, 176 Patriots Pt. Rd., 29464
 
December 1-2
That HOLIDAY Book Sale
Mt. Pleasant Regional Library
1133 Mathis Ferry Rd., 29464 

Admission is free to all sales. Special member events will be held the Thursday before each sale for The Charleston Friends of the Library members. To become a member of The Charleston Friends of the Library, visit www.charlestonlibraryfriends.org or call (843) 805-6882. Individual membership is $20 annually and will last through December 2017.

The Charleston Friends of the Library, a non-profit volunteer organization, raises money through book sales to help fund Library services, equipment, training, materials and public programming. The Friends collect and sort donated books for resale to raise money.

For more information, contact Brittany Mathis, the Executive Director of Charleston Friends of the Library, at (843) 805-6882 or 
Director@charlestonlibraryfriends.org.

 

Input needed for new James Island branch

CHARLESTON COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY
FOR RELEASE - October 28, 2015

Library consultants seek input for new James Island branch

The public has spoken, but we need to hear more. Last November, Charleston County Public Library asked residents if they wanted to pay to build new libraries and renovate existing ones. You approved the proposal by nearly 3-to-1, telling us just how important you feel libraries are and that you want more.

It's now time to get down to the nitty gritty. The County has hired a team of consultants and architects to develop a plan that lists what kind of spaces and services should be in each of the five new buildings, and they need your input. It's your neighborhood library, and we want to know what you consider the top priorities in the children's area, the reference area, meeting rooms, study rooms, display areas, etc. 

A meeting to discuss the new James Island branch was previously held October 1, but due to the torrential rainstorms that started that night, local officials and residents requested a second meeting since many people didn't want to come out in the rain.

Charleston County Public Library should reflect our community and have buildings that will take us into the future. Attend this meeting, and help us make that happen.

Monday, November 9 at 7 p.m.
New James Island Branch Library
 
James Island Elementary School Cafeteria
1872 Grimball Road, Charleston

Voters approved a referendum to spend $108.5 million to build five new branch libraries, renovate 13 existing branches and move support services out of the Main Library to free up more space for the public. A major focus includes upgrading technology by adding self check-out kiosks, more public computers and the latest equipment in public meeting rooms.

Charleston County has hired Charleston-based architectural firm Cummings & McCrady Inc. to oversee this planning phase. Several other architectural firms are involved, including library-planning specialists McMillan Pazden Smith from Greenville.

To learn more about the construction and renovation plan, view a map and see a breakdown of the estimated costs, 
click here. Residents unable to attend a meeting can send comments to letusknow@ccpl.org.


Images of South America Exhibit
 
   

Images of South America – Sailing with Art

 

The Charleston County Public Library cordially invites you to Images of South America – Sailing with Art, a special month-long exhibit at the Main Library, 68 Calhoun Street.

Nine Charleston artists have come together to have a dynamic art exhibit in which each participating artist explores and expresses ideas through their art that serve to promote understanding and communication between North and South Americans.

Opening Reception: September 6th,
from 6 - 8 p.m.

Come meet all the artists and join us to celebrate this powerful exhibit!


Additional Events

Thursday, September 20 from 6 - 8 p.m.
Main Library Auditorium

South American writer, lawyer, and mariner Isabel Cristina Castillo-Mercer will share poetry from from her new book, Sailing with Art.

Thursday, October 4 from 6 - 8 p.m.
Main Library Auditorium

Local author Jacqueline Kelm will present "The Art of Joy," based on her book The Joy of Appreciative Living: Your 28-day Plan for Greater Happiness in 3 Incredibly Easy Steps. In this engaging presentation, Kelm will share how we are the artists of our own lives. The presentation will be followed by a book signing, with all the proceeds from the evening's sales to benefit the Charleston County Public Library.

For more information about Images of South America, please visit the website of contributing artist Marty Biernbaum.

 
 
Sign-up for Smart911 this Saturday
Book drive continues librarian's legacy

To continue the early literacy goals of 31-year CCPL librarian Cynthia Graham Hurd, one of nine people killed in 2015 during a shooting at Emanuel AME Church, her siblings started a foundation and are planning a month-long book drive in June – the anniversary of the shooting and Cynthia’s birthday month.

Announced during a press conference May 12 by Hurd’s siblings, the newly created Cynthia Graham Hurd Foundation for Literacy and Civic Engagement is joining forces with Reading Partners-Charleston, CCPL and Live 5 WCSC to collect new and gently used children’s books at six library branches in Charleston County during June. The books will be distributed through Reading Partners to elementary and pre-school students being tutored by the organization’s volunteers to help bring their reading skills up to grade level. A similar book drive is planned to help students in the Charlotte community.

 June Book Drive

  • New/gently used books
  • Kindergarten through fifth grade

Charleston area drop-off points

       Related June programs.


Cynthia’s brother, Malcolm, said his sister loved reading and sharing literature with people of all ages. She was dedicated to making sure every child had access to books, learned to read and developed a lifelong love for books and reading. The foundation is continuing her efforts through the goals of the foundation and book drive. 
Read more about her service at the library and to the community.

“We’re celebrating life and legacy of not only our sister, but those who died with her. We are not focused on how they died. We are focused on how they lived,” said brother Malcolm Graham, who launched the foundation and book drive with siblings Melvin Graham, Averill “Jackie” Graham Jones, Robert Moultrie and Gilbert Moultrie. Family members made the first donation to the Foundation by donating $5,000 and purchasing 300 books to be distributed to children during June at the Dart Branch Library and the St. Andrews Regional Library, both branches managed by Hurd during her library career.

Kecia Greenho, executive director of Reading Partners-Charleston, praised the efforts of Cynthia and her family for making a difference in the lives of children who aren’t reading on par with their grade level.

“Our mission is to foster a love of literacy and empower and engage students in a lifelong love of learning,” Greenho said about Reading Partners, acknowledging that it sounds like it matches the life mission of Cynthia Graham Hurd, too.

“Eighty percent of children living in poverty in South Carolina do not read proficiently. That is a staggering number, and the only way we are going to solve this problem is by engaging the community,” she added, saying the books will be distributed through the organizations 800+ volunteers in the Charleston area tutoring students twice weekly in one-on-one sessions. The program targets children in grades kindergarten through fifth grade who are below their grade level in reading and are at under resourced schools. The books will be given to the students to help them develop a love for reading by being able to practice at home and build an at-home library.

Nationwide, Reading Partners has approximately 14,000 volunteer tutors who help more than 10,000 students improve their reading skills.
 
 Charleston area partners
 
   
Read for the Record Events at the Library
Library brings children together to break world record and promote reading

Charleston County children will help break a world record Thursday, October 6 as they join two million children nationwide reading the same book on the same day in Jumpstart’s Read for the Record initiative, a project designed to draw attention to the importance of reading.

Charleston County Public Library is hosting 10 Read for the Record events Thursday to read this year’s book - Llama Llama Red Pajama by Anna Dewdney. To help promote this community-wide event and encourage attendance, the Library partnered with the City of Charleston Mayor’s Office for Children, Youth and Families to secure special guest readers at three branches – Charleston Mayor Joseph Riley, Charleston City Police Chief Greg Mullen and WCBD-TV 2 News Anchor Carolyn Murray.

The Jumpstart mission is to help every child develop language, literacy and social skills so they will be ready to enter school. Jumpstart’s mission dovetails with CCPL’s expanded initiatives to reach preschool students and families, an effort that grew dramatically 10 months ago when the Library added more than 100 PLAY (Public Libraries and You) programs every month specifically to reach families on Saturdays and in the evenings. All together, the Library offers about 250 children’s programs each month at its 16 locations.

Jumpstart works with We Give Books, a digital reading and philanthropic initiative of the Pearson Foundation and Penguin Books, to coordinate the annual Read for the Record event. They select a book, and copies are donated to participants across the country. The goal of the annual one-day reading celebration is to raise awareness of America’s early education achievement gap.

According to Jumpstart, research shows that:

  • one in three American children enter kindergarten without the basic skills needed, and most children never catch up;
  • children from low-income neighborhoods are more likely to fail in school because they don’t have access to high quality early education;
  • children from low-income neighborhoods generally start kindergarten 60% behind their wealthier peers; and
  • children who complete quality early education programs do better in school and are less likely to dropout, be arrested, repeat grades or require special education.

 

Charleston County Public Library’s Read for the Record Events

Thursday, October 6, 2011

  • John L. Dart Branch at 10:30 a.m.
    1067 King Street, Charleston
    Special Guest Reader: Charleston City Police Chief Greg Mullen
  • Main Library at 10:30 a.m.
    68 Calhoun St., Charleston
    Special Guest Reader: Charleston Mayor Joseph P. Riley
  • James Island Branch at 10:30 a.m.
    1248 Camp Road, James Island
  • Otranto Road Regional at 10:30 a.m.
    2261 Otranto Rd., North Charleston
  • St. Andrews Regional at 11:30 a.m.
    1735 N. Woodmere Dr., Charleston
    Special Guest Reader: WCBD-TV 2 News Anchor Carolyn Murray
  • Main Library at 3:30 p.m.
    68 Calhoun St., Charleston
  • Mt. Pleasant Regional at 4 p.m.
    1133 Mathis Ferry Rd., Mt. Pleasant
  • Poe/Sullivan’s Island Branch at 4 p.m.
    1921 I’on Avenue, Sullivan’s Island
  • McClellanville Branch at 4:30 p.m.
    222 Baker Street, McClellanville
  • James Island Branch at 5:30 p.m.
    1248 Camp Road, James Island
September is Library Card Sign-Up Month
 

The most important back-to-school supply for students is free

 

Charleston County Public Library is encouraging county residents to sign up for a free card - adding it to every child's school supply list and to every adult's wallet or key ring. 

This nationwide campaign is held each September to promote signing up in conjunction with the start of school. Studies have shown that children who are read to in the home and who use the library perform better in school and are more likely to use the library as a source of lifelong learning.

In an effort to reach students as they transition from one school or grade to another, Library staff visit schools with a special focus on students in kindergarten and sixth grade. In 2014, there were 256,481 library cardholders, library staff registered 791 students and 3,857 items were checked out by those students during the year.  

Smartest Card Image


In Charleston County, students can get help through the Library's Ask-A-Question reference service where they can get help from a Reference Librarian by visiting a branch, calling 805-6930, use instant messaging by typing a question into the chat box on the CCPL website, e-mailing askaquestion@ccpl.org or text 66756 and begin your question with askccpl. 

The Library's website - www.ccpl.org - also offers Homework Help under Services for Children and provides free access to dozens of reliable reference databases in its Resources section, many of them available remotely simply by logging in with a Library card number.

Don't wait, apply online for a library card today.

 
 
Library Board Meeting Canceled


Library Board meetings are held for the purpose of conducting business necessary for the operations of the public library system in Charleston County. These meetings are scheduled for the 4th Tuesday at 5:15 p.m., except where altered by public holiday or anticipated deadlines for action. The public is welcome to attend.      

 

The Library Board will meet at 5:15 p.m. on the following dates:

January 27 at Dorchester Regional Library - 
Board Packet
February 24 at Main Library Auditorium - Board Packet - Canceled
March 24 at Mt. Pleasant Regional Library
April 28 at Main Library Auditorium
May 26 at St. Andrews Regional Library
June 23 at Main Library Auditorium
August 25 at Main Library Auditorium
September 29 at Otranto Road Regional Library
October 27 at Main Library Auditorium 
December 1 at John’s Island Regional Library


Lowcountry Blues Bash rocks the library
  

February 13-17, 2012

  

Join us for some free live music at the Main Library!

  

Monday, February 13
12-1 p.m.:  Rich DelGrosso and John Del Toro Richardson
Nationally-known mandolin and guitar duo in their South Carolina debut

2-3 p.m.:  Bobby Radcliff
Razor-sharp West Side Chicago guitar & impassioned vocals ... extraordinary

Tuesday, February 14
12-1 p.m.:  Cotton Blue
Edisto’s Gator Rob & Detroit Debbie play swamp blues/rock

2-3 p.m.:  Eddie Shaw & The Wolf Gang
Last of their era, the former backing (Chicago) band of Howlin’ Wolf ... essential

Wednesday, February 15
12-1 p.m.:  Shrimp City Slim with Swamp Pop Shelly Lowcountry blues & originals

2-3 p.m.:  Paul Geremia
Fingerpicking virtuoso, folk-blues legend, in biz since the 1960s

Thursday, February 16
12-1 p.m.:  Gail Storm
Feisty pianist/singer on a rare Southern tour

2-3 p.m.:  Robert Lighthouse
Bash favorite returns to channel Dr. Ross, Muddy, Robert Johnson, et. al.

Friday, February 17
12-1 p.m.:  John Primer
Acclaimed modern blues giant, ex-Muddy, Willie Dixon, Magic Slim

2-3 p.m.:  Drink Small
Our state’s blues legend, in biz since the 1950s and about to turn 79

 

   
   
   
   
Cultivating Community through Story: Tonight
Readers Fair: May 20 at Main Library

Main Library 
from 9:15 a.m.-12 p.m.
Meet and greet local authors, share books you have read, discover new titles, or attend a demonstration session to learn how to access eBooks and audiobooks with a library card. See detailed descriptions below.

We Are Charleston: Tragedy and Triumph at Mother Emanuel
by Herb Frazier, Bernard Powers and Marjory Wentworth
9:15 - 10:15 a.m. | Auditorium
This is the story of the events and aftermath of the Mother Emanuel church shooting on June 17, 2015. When the victims' families forgave the shooter via closed circuit video screen, they set a profound example for their city, the nation, and the world. We Are Charleston explores how the storied history of Emanuel AME Church relates the power of forgiveness and how God’s mercy can be revealed in the midst of tremendous pain.

Target Tokyo: Jimmy Doolittle and the Raid that Avenged Pearl Harbor
by James Scott
9:15 - 10:15 a.m. | Meeting Room B

Four months after the attack on Pearl Harbor, Jimmy Doolittle raided and bombed parts of Tokyo's industrial complex with the help of 16 planes and various crews whose efforts altered the course of World War II. While some of Doolittle's comrades made it to China, others faced starvation and torture within Japanese prison camps. Scott recounts the story of the Doolittle raiders from both Japanese and American perspectives, and Target Tokyo earned him recognition as a 2016 Pulitzer Prize finalist.

Class: CCPL's Digital Media Resources by Tech Team Staff
9:15 - 10:15 a.m. | Second Floor Classroom

Learn about CCPL's eBook and audiobook collection, and practice using the library website and related apps to check out books from OverDrive, OneClickdigital and hoopla. Review lending restrictions and additional features during this demonstration. No registration required.

Blind Match Book Share: Table for 48 Experiment
10:15 - 11 a.m. | Auditorium

Join a fun social experiment, and share book recommendations during brief conversations with fellow readers. Come prepared with a short plot description for a digital or print library book you've enjoyed, and learn about potential titles to add to your reading list. To register, please submit your name, a book title and two-sentence plot description to schwengels@ccpl.org, or call 843-805-6943 by May 17.

Ocean of Insight: A Sailor's Voyage from Despair to Hope
by Heather Lyn Mann
11 a.m. - 12 p.m. | Second Floor Classroom

Ocean of Insight is a chronological account of the disaster and discovery that Heather Lyn Mann experienced during the six years she lived in a small sloop on the Atlantic Ocean. During her time at sea, Mann witnessed sinking ships, life-threatening storms, societies on the brink of extinction, a pirate scare, and more. This memoir relates life-affirming lessons about nature, fearlessness, resilience, happiness and compassion. Mann is a spiritual ecologist and retired founder/director of the Center for Resilient Cities.

Jackpot: High Times, High Seas, and the Sting that Launched the War on Drugs
by Jason Ryan

11 a.m. - 12 p.m. | Meeting Room B
During the golden age of marijuana trafficking in the 1970s-1980s, some of the country's most prominent kingpins included a group of wayward and fun-loving South Carolinians who forsook college educations to sail drug-laden luxury sailboats across the Mediterranean, the Atlantic and the Caribbean. Les Riley, Barry Foy and their comrades eschewed violence as much as they loved pleasure, but greed, lust, disaster at sea and the law ultimately caught up with them. South Carolina's Operation Jackpot was one of the largest drug investigations ever launched and an opening volley in Ronald Reagan's War on Drugs.
CCPL Summer Reading: June 1-July 31


Summer Reading begins June 1. Don't miss out on great prizes! 

This summer, from June 1 through July 31, Charleston County Public Library is rewarding everyone for simply reading. Visit any of our 16 branches to sign up, or 
click here to register online, and log what you read to win prizes!     
 

Build a Better World is for readers age 11 and younger. Children receive prizes for reading or listening to stories at levels of 5, 15 and 30 hours. Awards include the S.C. Reading Medal, passes to local attractions, karate lessons and branch grand prizes. Enjoy nearly 700 programs that include live animals, storytellers, music and other exciting events. 

Summer Reading for Babies
 is for pre-readers with activity sheets designed for caregivers and babies. Turn it in to win a board book and a free tote bag.

Build a Better World Reading Contest is for students entering grades 6-12. Read anything you like, and win cool prizes, free food, passes to local attractions and gift cards. There will be weekly prize drawings, grand prize drawings and rewards for reaching your reading goal. The more you read, the more you can win!
 

Designed for readers age 18 and older, Reading Wave rewards adults for reading with bi-monthly prizes and a grand prize drawing. Read along with Charleston County's youth and cash in - you deserve it!


Seamless Summer Feeding Program
CCPL will serve free breakfast to children in need this summer through its participation in the Seamless Summer Feeding Program run by the Charleston County School District. There is no approval process required for participants to redeem free breakfast. Click here to learn more and view the branch schedule.

Photos or videos may be taken at CCPL events and activities for library use in promotion and publicity. Anyone not wanting to have their photo taken should notify library staff at the time of the event or activity. 

One Book Charleston County Events 

Hampton Park Movie Night       Daufuskie Island Photography Exhibit

Book Discussion Sessions

 

Tuesday, September 13 at 6:30 p.m.
Film: Meet the Filmmaker and Watch the Classic, Daughters of the Dust
Trident Technical College Center Complex for Economic Development
7000 Rivers Avenue, North Charleston: 574-6111
Enjoy the internationally recognized cult classic, Daughters of the Dust, as it explores the lives of the Peazant family who celebrate their Gullah heritage on a sea island off the Lowcountry coast. After the movie, hear from author, filmmaker Julie Dash about the journey that led her to make this internationally celebrated film. Enjoy popcorn and soft drinks during the film.

Thursday, September 15 at 6 p.m.
A Conversation About Gullah Culture
Main Library
68 Calhoun Street, Charleston: 805-6930
Their own lives touched by the Gullah culture, three experts will share their stories of growing up or spending time living in a community steeped in the traditions and lore of the Gullah community. Join internationally recognized artist Jonathan Green, publisher and editor of Native Magazine Deona Smith and Daughters of the Dust filmmaker/author Julie Dash for this one-of-a-kind event. The program will be moderated by Avery Research Center’s Executive Director Patricia Williams Lessane.

Monday, September 19 at 6 p.m.
Midwifery Traditions in the South Carolina Lowcountry
Main Library
68 Calhoun Street, Charleston: 805-6930
Pregnancy and birth form important themes in Julie Dash’s Daughters of the Dust. Hear a panel of experts discuss the role midwives played in childbirth in the African-American community from the time of slavery to the present. Among the experts will be Dr. Ida Spruill, assistant professor at MUSC’s College of Nursing.

Tuesday, September 20 at 6:30 p.m.
Daughters of the Dust: From Idea to Film
John L. Dart Branch Library
1067 King Street, Charleston: 722-7550
Join Julie Dash as she talks about being an independent filmmaker and the journey she took creating the film that launched her career. Dash will reflect up her own family history that led her to create a film and book that focused on the Gullah culture of the South Carolina Lowcountry.

Wednesday, September 21 at 6 p.m.
Film: Cinematic Jazz of Julie Dash by Yvonne Welbon
Main Library
68 Calhoun Street, Charleston: 805-6930
Enjoy this film about critically acclaimed filmmaker Julie Dash’s 1992 movie, Daughters of the Dust, which broke cinematic ground and redefined black women's images on screen. Through a series of interviews, Dash reflects on her background, her approach to filmmaking plus the struggles and victories of African-American women in film. Following the film, learn more about Dash’s impact on filmmaking from Joy Vandervort-Cobb, Associate Professor of African American Theatre and Performance at the College of Charleston.

Thursday, September 22 at 6 p.m.
The Color of Music: Drums, Fifes and Bands in Early Charleston
Main Library
68 Calhoun Street, Charleston: 805-6930
From colonial times through the Civil War, the sounds of black militia musicians echoed through the streets of Charleston and set the stage for the advent of jazz. Join CCPL archivist and historian Dr. Nicholas Butler for an illustrated introduction to this little-known, 300-year-old musical legacy.

Sunday, September 25 at 4 p.m.
A Gullah Celebration Through Storytelling and Music
John’s Island Regional Library
3531 Maybank Highway, John’s Island: 559-1945
Storyteller Sharon Cooper-Murray, the Gullah Lady, and well-known Charleston singer Ann Caldwell will join forces to share the rich history of the Gullah community that thrived on South Carolina’s Sea Islands.

Monday, September 26 at 6 p.m.
African-American Genealogy for Beginners:
Strategies and Sources for Tracing your Lineage
Main Library
68 Calhoun Street, Charleston: 805-6930
Interested in tracing your roots? Local genealogy expert Wevonneda Minis joins CCPL historians Christina Shedlock and Dr. Nicholas Butler for an overview of research strategies and a discussion of helpful local resources.

 

Hampton Park Movie Night
Saturday, September 17 from 5-10 p.m.
A Family Celebration: One Book at Hampton Park
Hampton Park, Charleston
Bring the family, a blanket and a picnic to watch the film, Daughters of the Dust, on a Jumbotron at Hampton Park. Prior to the film, the afternoon will be filled with entertainment, including musical performances, storytellers and sweetgrass basket-making demonstrations. The schedule includes:

5-7 p.m.
5 p.m.
5:30 p.m.
6 p.m.
6:30 p.m.
7 p.m.
Sunset
 

Demonstrations by Henrietta Snype, Sweetgrass Basket Weaver
The Magnolia Singers, Featuring Ann Caldwell
Veronica Gailliard, Storyteller
The Plantation Singers
Sharon Cooper-Murray, The Gullah Lady
Encore performance from The Magnolia Singers, Featuring Ann Caldwell
Remarks and film introduction by producer, writer, director Julie Dash
Screening, Daughters of the Dust

 

Daufuskie Island: Photographs by Jeanne Moutoussamy-Ashe
Charleston County Main Library Lobby
September 2011
Click here to view some of Moutoussamy-Ashe's photos.
In the early 1980s, Daufuskie Island stood alone as the last South Carolina sea island untouched by the outside world, serving as a home to residents whose Gullah lifestyle, traditions and language were preserved because of their isolation. Recognizing this unique culture and the need to capture this culture, Jeanne Moutoussamy-Ashe used her camera to chronicle the life of the island. Visiting Daufauskie several times, she found residents living with little or no electricity, using ox-drawn carts for transportation, cooking over open fires and sending their children to a one-room schoolhouse. Living on a sea island and separated from the outside world, these African descendents continued practicing their native traditions, even creating their own language by mixing English and West African languages. Today, the Daufuskie Island witnessed by Moutoussamy-Ashe is just a memory, lost to the pressures of development that displaced the island’s inhabitants with hotels and manicured lawns. The widow of tennis great Arthur Ashe, Moutoussamy-Ashe’s work has appeared in Life, Smithsonian, Sports Illustrated, Ebony, Essence, People and The New York Times and in exhibitions around the world.

 
Library adds streaming music and films

New streaming services are free for those with library cards

Charleston County residents now can stream a wide variety of music and award-winning independent films for free through two online services available from Charleston County Public Library.

Anyone with a library card can enjoy the streaming services by visiting the library’s website – www.ccpl.org – and logging into either Freegal or IndieFlix on the site’s Downloadable Media page. 

With Freegal, customers can stream three hours of music daily and download five music tracks to keep each week. This free music service offers access to approximately 9 million songs from genres including rock, hip-hop, top 40, pop, country, classical, reggae, jazz, blues, Latin and more through the Sony Music Entertainment catalog.

Fans of independent cinema can use the IndieFlix streaming film service to access award-winning shorts, feature films and documentaries, including some films shown at major festivals all over the world, including Sundance, Cannes and Tribeca. Users can instantly watch the thousands of films available from more than 50 countries and search films by language, genre, film length or country of origin. Customers can use the service on any Internet-enabled computer, smartphone or tablet with a web browser, along with Roku and xBox.




Access to streaming music and films is CCPL’s latest offering of free digital material available through the library’s website. Customers can download free eBooks, audio books and magazines plus enjoy interactive storybooks and online activities for children. So far this year, county residents have downloaded or checked out 200,000 digital titles from the library’s online services. The vast majority, approximately 60 percent, are free downloadable eBooks that people can read on their digital devices or computers.

For a full list of all the free digital materials available, check the Downloadable Media link on the left side of the library’s homepage – www.ccpl.org

 

 

 

Wednesday Wine Tasting with the Friends
Scheduled interlibrary loan outage Jan. 3
CCPL's interlibrary loan webpage and services will be unavailable January 3 from 12:01 a.m. - 3 p.m. due to a scheduled technology upgrade. We appreciate your patience. 
CCPL adds free, downloadable magazines

Charleston County residents now can read or download free digital copies of more than 150 of the most popular magazines - if they have a Charleston County Public Library card.

CCPL is adding Zinio for Libraries to its array of downloadable services. With Zinio, residents can use their computers or mobile apps to read digital versions of magazines like Newsweek, Us Weekly, O The Oprah Magazine, Food Network Magazine, National Geographic Interactive, Rolling Stone, Cosmopolitan, Men’s Health, Weight Watchers, Popular Photography, Macworld, Motor Trend, Bloomberg Businessweek, House Beautiful and Popular Mechanics.


There is no limit on how many people can read and download the same magazine within CCPL’s Zinio collection, which means library customers can read and keep as many magazines as they’d like. There is no need to wait for someone else to return the item, to place a hold or to return the magazine.

Customers new to Zinio must complete a one-time set up to identify them as a CCPL cardholder. When signing up for the first time, users should select Create Account on CCPL’s Zinio login page, and enter their library card number. After that, users need to set up a Zinio account with an email address and password. This allows online streaming and offline reading of magazines. The service works on computers and mobile devices, including iPads, iPhones, Android devices and Kindle Fire. Zinio also offers a mobile app.

 

A detailed breakdown of the registration process with screenshots of the necessary steps is available through Zinio’s online user guide.

 

While CCPL offers free access to a large selection of magazines, Zinio is a paid service that allows people to subscribe to digital magazines. Library users should make sure they use the library’s link to login. If a patron sees and selects a magazine not included in CCPL’s offerings, a screen will appear showing the subscription charge. 

 

Online access to magazines is CCPL’s latest offering of free downloadable, digital materials. The library also offers downloadable eBooks, audio books, music plus interactive storybooks and activities for children. For a full list, check the Downloadables link on the library’s homepage – www.ccpl.org.

 

 


  Examples of digital magazines available through CCPL: 

Art and Photography
ARTnews
Outdoor Photography
Shutterbug

Automotive
Transworld Motocross
Motor Trend
Road and Track

Current Events
Economist
Mother Jones
Forbes
 

Entertainment
OK! Magazine
Us Weekly
Rolling Stone

 Health and Wellness
Eating Well
Yoga Journal
Prevention

Hobbies and Crafts
BirdWatching
Woodworker’s Journal
Family Handyman

Lifestyle and Travel
Harper’s Bazaar
Esquire
SIERRA

Parenting and Kids
Zamoof!
Scholastic Parent & Child
Parenting School Years

Science and Technology
Audubon Magazine
Discover
PCWorld

 Sports
ESPN The Magazine
Soccer America
Sport Fishing


 

 

 

   
 



  

 

Back to School Events
FAMILY AND KIDS

Thursday, August 27
Crazy 8's Math Club (ages 5-9)
St. Andrews Regional Library at 4 p.m.
Enjoy a fun math skills session where math meets mischief.

Saturday, August 29
Geometric Keychains
Poe/Sullivan’s Island Branch Library at 10:30 a.m.
Make a colorful keychain with brightly colored foam beads.

Lego Fun (ages 11 and younger)
St. Andrews Regional Library at 11 a.m.
Get out your tools, and build something cool. Sponsored by Lowe's; supplies are limited.

Origami Hour (grades K-5)
John L. Dart Library at 1 p.m.
Learn how to fold paper into works of art. 


TEEN EVENTS

Throughout August 
Represent Your School 
St. Andrews Regional Library
Show school pride, and find your school mascot. Fill out the mascot form, and receive a sweet treat.

Back to School Prize Drawing 
Cooper River Memorial Library
Stop by the Circulation Desk, and complete an entry form for a chance to win some cool school supplies.

Wednesday, August 26
Game On (ages 10-18)
John L. Dart Library from 3:30-5 p.m.
Enjoy a fun-filled afternoon of gaming. Choose from board games and interactive video games.
 
TeenSpot Can You Hear Me? 
St. Andrews Regional Library at 4 p.m.
Bring your devices, and learn about CCPL's free music library. Seating limited.
 
Teen Tech Hour 
Dorchester Road Regional Library from 4:15-5:15 p.m.
Explore robotics and electronics, and make something cool.

Thursday, August 27
Teen Café 
Main Library from 3:30-5 p.m.
Enjoys snacks and games in the Teen Lounge.

The Ugly Sweater Tour arrives December 13
Book Dating Game at Main
Free downloadable eBooks available
 

 

Get started now!

With a few clicks, and a library card, Charleston County residents can download free eBooks to their computers and portable devices right from Charleston County Public Library’s website.

CCPL is offering more than 1,200 books for download through the library’s OverDrive eBook catalog, including best sellers, new releases, children’s books and the classics. The library will be regularly adding new releases and popular titles, with about 1,000 additional books added in the coming year.


Using free OverDrive and Adobe Digital downloadable software, the Library’s eBooks are compatible with the most common portable devices, including iPads, Kindles, Nooks and Sony Readers, plus they can be read on PCs and Macs. Some portable devices require the book to be downloaded onto a computer and transferred, while others use an application to access the Library’s eBook catalog and download directly. Kindle users follow the instructions for that device. All non-Kindle users will download Adobe EPUB versions of the books.

“This is another service we are adding that brings reading and information to the community and allows them to access it whenever and wherever they want,” said CCPL Executive Director Doug Henderson.

Residents can download two eBooks at a time and place hold requests on two books. Books are “checked out” for a maximum of 14 days, after which the electronic files automatically expire. If no one else has a hold request for the book, residents can check the book out for an additional 14 days. To download a book, patrons need to have a current CCPL Library Card in good standing.

OverDrive is a full-service distributor of digital content, including eBooks. The company provides downloadable digital content to 15,000 libraries worldwide.

In addition to the downloadable eBooks, the library has online book clubs, databases and talking storybooks for children. Sylvan Dell eBooks and TumbleBooks provide online books to help promote reading and language skills for children. The services provide read-along storybooks, games, quizzes and other activities. They also are available on the Library’s website by clicking the Download Books icon.

In the library’s online Reader’s Corner, patrons can sign up for NextReads e-newsletters based on their areas of interest. NextReads’s 19 e-newsletters profile recent releases and offer suggestions based on the subject, such as science fiction, business and personal finance, popular culture and historical fiction.

In addition to these reader services, CCPL offers nearly 100 research databases, with most available remotely on the Internet. The databases cover topics including history, genealogy, finance and investing, legal forms, career and job assistance, literature and science.

To learn about all the online offerings, call Charleston County Public Library at 805-6930 or send an email to askaquestion@ccpl.org

.

 
 
 
Special Library Board Meeting July 19

The Library's Board of Trustees meets to conduct business necessary for the operations of the public library system in Charleston County. A special meeting will be held at 10 a.m. on Tuesday, July 19 at Main Library.

Agenda

DIY Festival: This Saturday at Main Library

Saturday, February 27 from 1-4 p.m.
FREE  

Enjoy an afternoon of creativity and collaboration during the third annual Charleston DIY Festival at Main Library, 68 Calhoun Street, from 1-4 p.m. on Saturday, February 27. Explore the local do-it-yourself movement with interactive booths, lectures and live music presented by a variety of makers, hobbyists and organizations. Learn about new technology, delve into the world of arts and crafts, and discover how people in Charleston County are coming together in creative ways. The Festival features:  

Interactive booths from the following organizations: 

Lectures from the following individuals and organizations: Live music from Chaquis Maliq 

There will also will be a community art project entitled Our Charleston, and the winners of February's DIY Upcycling Competition will be announced.

For more information, email diyfest@ccpl.org.

This project was funded in part by the City of Charleston Office of Cultural Affairs and the City of North Charleston Cultural Arts Program through their joint administration of the Lowcountry Quarterly Arts.

 

Enjoy holiday programs in December

FAMILY AND KIDS

Friday, December 19 
Crafternoon - Holiday Cards

Poe/Sullivan's Island Branch Library from 3-5 p.m.
Create cards to share your holiday spirit.

Friday After-school Movie
John L. Dart Library at 3:30 p.m.
Elf. Rated PG; 95 minutes.

Saturday, December 20 
Holiday Cards

Poe/Sullivan's Island Branch Library at 10:30 a.m.
Create cards to share your holiday spirit.

Matinee Movie 
Otranto Road Regional Library at 11 a.m.
The Santa Clause. Rated PG; 97 minutes.

Frozen Winter Wonderland (ages 11 and younger) 
St. Andrews Regional Library at 11 a.m.
Do you want to build a snowman? Celebrate the season, enjoy a special viewing of Disney's Frozen, make Frozen-themed crafts, wear your favorite Frozen costume and share snacks. Rated PG; 102 minutes.

Movie Fun
Edisto Branch Library at 11 a.m.
Bolt. Rated G; 96 minutes.

Ho Ho Ho Holiday fun 
McClellanville Branch Library at 11 a.m.
Enjoy Christmas crafts and holiday celebration.

Saturday Craft and Storytime 
St. Paul's/Hollywood Branch Library from 12-2 p.m.
Listen to The Christmas Magic by Lauren Thompson, and make a fun craft.

PLAY with Parents: Sigma Saturday
John L. Dart Library at 1 p.m.
Enjoy a carpentry workshop with members of Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc. Sponsored by Lowe's.

Movie 
West Ashley Branch Library at 2 p.m.
The Search for Santa Paws. Rated G; 96 minutes.

10th Annual V-Tones Holiday Extravaganza 
Main Library at 3 p.m.
Join Charleston's premier ukulele band to ring in the holiday season.

Holiday Picture Bingo (ages 4-11)
Village Branch Library at 4 p.m.
Bring along family and friends, and play Holiday picture Bingo to win a prize.

Monday, December 22 
Holiday Party

Folly Beach Library at 10:30 a.m.
Enjoy a holiday celebration with crafts, music and treats.

Monday Movie
West Ashley Branch Library at 2 p.m.
Mickey Mouse‘s Christmas Carol. Rated G; 26 minutes.

Saturday, December 27 
Countdown to a Happy 2015

McClellanville Branch Library
Make your own countdown clock.

Snowflakes
Poe/Sullivan's Island Branch Library at 10:30 a.m.
No two are alike, so make a beautiful snowflake to express your style.

Hooray for a New Year
Edisto Branch Library at 11 a.m.
Read a story, and make a craft to celebrate the beginning of 2015.

December Holidays Around the World
John L. Dart Library at 1 p.m.
Learn about how people celebrate December holidays in other countries, and make some cool crafts.

Tuesday, December 30
Winter Tree Decorating(ages 6-12)
John's Island Regional Library at 5:30 p.m.
Help celebrate the rich and diverse traditions celebrated around the world in December. Create ornaments for our holiday tree, and make one to take home.  

Friday After-school Movie
John L. Dart Library at 3:30 p.m.
Dr. Seuss's How the Grinch Stole Christmas. Rated PG; 104 minutes.

Wednesday, December 31 
New Year's Noon Party

Otranto Road Regional Library at 11:15 a.m.
Countdown to New Years' noon with games, songs and crafts.

TEEN EVENTS

Saturday, December 20
YA Movie

Dorchester Road Regional Library at 10:30 a.m.
Tyler Perry's A Madea Christmas. Rated PG-13; 100 minutes.

Christmas Movie for Teens
Mt. Pleasant Regional Library at 2 p.m.
Tyler Perry's A Madea Christmas with Tyler Perry and Eric Lively. Rated PG-13; 142 minutes.

Monday, December 29 
TeenSpot Christmas Theater 
St. Andrews Regional Library at 4 p.m. 
Enjoy various movies that will put you in the holiday spirit. 

CLASSES, LECTURES AND FILMS
Throughout December 
Adult Crafts-to-Go
Dorchester Road Regional Library
Stop by the library, and complete a holiday craft. Please see Information Desk for details.

Monday, December 29
Midday Movie
(adults)
John L. Dart Library at 12 p.m.
Tyler Perry's A Madea Christmas. Rated PG-13; 100 minutes.

 

 

Library Board of Trustees Special Meetings

Tuesday, June 21, 2016 at 1 p.m. -  Agenda
Wednesday, June 22, 2016 at 9:30 a.m. -  Agenda
CCPL updates online catalog

A new online catalog is now available to provide easier search options for library users.

CCPL recently updated its online catalog, which allows users to search for books, DVDs, CDs, videos and other materials, place holds, renew items currently checked out and view books on various bestseller lists.

The catalog has a new look, and more features will be added in the future. Until the installation and all updates are complete, some existing direct links to library materials may not work. The items can still be found by going to the catalog and doing a search. 

To better understand how to access key features and where, check out the tips and sample pages below.   

 Catalog Home Page with key points highlighted

  • To search by Title, Author, Keyword or ISBN, click the arrow by the drop down menu that says ALL FIELDS.
  • To access your library account, review materials currently checked out, place a hold or renew items, click the LOG IN or MY ACCOUNT buttons in the top right corner. You must have a PIN number to access your account. If you don't have a PIN, contact your local branch library.
  • To perform a more precise search, click the ADVANCED SEARCH button.
  • To check out the latest bestseller lists, click the arrow by the drop down menu that says NY TIMES - HARDCOVER FICTION.
  • From the main catalog page, users also can:
    • sign up for the free Library Elf service to get emails or text messages to remind them when items are due or tell them when a hold is available;
    • access the library's collection of downloadable materials, including downloadable eBooks, audio books and music;
    • find out how to get an item through Interlibrary loan, if CCPL doesn't have it; and
    • quickly go back to the library's homepage - www.ccpl.org.

When searching for an item, the Search Results Page looks much different and provides more options.

 Catalog Search Results Page

  • Filters are available along the left side of the page to specify the author, type of material needed, publication date and even find out which items are at a certain branch.
  • Once an item is found, a PLACE HOLD button is available on the right or in the SELECT AN ACTION drop down menu.
  • The drop down menu even provides the ability to email yourself or others a link to a specific item in the catalog.

More information will be available soon about some of the newer features. Until then, click here to visit the catalog and check out the changes. For more information, click here to find out how to contact the library by email, phone, text message or instant message. 

Let this Elf help you prevent overdue fines
 
Managing and organizing your library account just became easier with an online service now offered free to Charleston County Public Library patrons.

Library Elf is an optional, stand-alone service that lets patrons easily keep up with what items they have checked out, receive
e-mail notices, text messages or RSS reminders when items are due or when requested items become available.
  

It also gives families the ability to check the status of items from multiple library cards in one place, which will help residents avoid overdue fines and better organize library trips by knowing they have a complete list of all items due.

This new service is linked to the CCPL catalog and allows patrons to customize what information they want to receive, how often and even lets them set up reminders seven days before an item becomes due. It also allows them to decide the best format for receiving notices – e-mails, texts, RSS alerts.

To sign up, visit the
Library Elf link on the left of CCPL’s Catalog and use your Library Card number and PIN number to sign up. This service is optional and is in addition to the regular e-mail or postcard reminders sent by CCPL. If you need more information, visit the Library Elf FAQ page or call CCPL at 843-805-6930.

 
 
 
Celebrate Read Across America March 2
Free music downloads available
 

 

Get started with Freegal Music

Free music downloads are just a click away for Charleston County Public Library users. By going onto the library’s website and using their library card number, area residents can download the best from artists like Adele, Beyoncé, Kelly Clarkson, Pitbull and Miranda Lambert.

The library is adding downloadable music through Freegal (rhymes with legal) Music Service, which includes rock, hip-hop, top 40, pop, country, classical, reggae, jazz, blues, Latin and more. It all comes from the vast music catalog of Sony Music Entertainment.


The Freegal site allows users to hear a sample clip from each song before downloading, and it also keeps track of past downloads so patrons can easily manage their music files. Patrons can browse thousands of titles and download up to three items free each week. The week runs from 12:01 a.m. Monday morning until midnight the next Sunday night.

The files are downloaded in Mp3 format. Some devices allow direct downloads, but those using the Apple’s iPod, iPhone or iPad will first need to download the files into their computer then add them to their music iTunes music library.

To make it even easier, free apps are available for iOS devices in iTunes and for Android devices in the Google Play Store. Note: The Freegal iOS app for Apple devices at this time cannot transfer audio files outside of the application and device.

This service is an exciting addition to the library’s existing collection of free downloadable eBooks and Audio Books, both offered through Overdrive. The downloadable books include fiction, non-fiction and titles for children.

Freegal is part of Library Ideas, LLC, a global media company that provides solutions to better serve patrons in an increasingly digitized world. Serving public libraries, schools, universities and military bases, Library Ideas products are used by cardholders of over 1,000 libraries in the United States and abroad.


TIPS FOR DOWNLOADING

  • Make sure to Save it when prompted: When downloading, the user can Open or Save the file. Choosing to Open the file will allow the
    user to listen to the song, but it must be saved to access it again in the future.

  • Use a Music Manager: Music Managers allow users to keep all of their music in one, easy-to-access place.
    • Adding songs to iTunesDownload the files to your desktop or to a music folder. Once downloaded, import the files into iTunes by it dragging into the window
      or using the Add File to Library feature.
    • Adding songs to Windows Media Player If the song does not open in Windows Media Player, launch Windows Media Player and click/drag the song into the player or select File – Import File. For multiple songs, users can choose to Import Folder.

  • Music Manager Album Art: In Windows Media Player, album or track cover art is embedded in the file. With the most recent version of iTunes, simply click on the “Advanced” drop down menu and select “Get Album Artwork” for the song.

For more information on Freegal, visit the Charleston County Public Library’s website at www.ccpl.org and click the Downloadables button in the left-hand banner or contact the library directly at 843-805-6930.

   
   
   
   
Star Wars Reads Day: Oct. 10 at Main Library
Synopsis of the book

Book follows Peazant family 24 years after film
 

Inspired by her Sundance Festival award-winning film Daughters of the Dust, Julie Dash put her cinematic vision on the page, penning a rich, magical novel that follows the story of a family of complex, independent African-American women.

Set in the 1920s in the sea islands off the South Carolina coast where the Gullah people preserved much of their African heritage and language, Daughters Of The Dust chronicles the lives of the Peazant family. Originally from the Ibo Landing area, the family’s ancestors were enslaved and brought to the islands more than 100 years before.

In the book, native New Yorker Amelia Peazant returns to her mother's sea island home to trace her family's history. From her multigenerational clan she gathers colorful stories, learning about "the first man and woman," the slaves who walked across the water back home to Africa, the ways men and women need each other, and the intermingling of African and Native-American cultures.

Through her experiences, Amelia comes to treasure her family traditions and her relationship with her fiercely independent cousin Elizabeth. Daughters of the Dust is ultimately a story of homecoming and the reclaiming of family and cultural heritage.

 
 
 
 
Thousands of free digital titles added

July 28, 2016

Library adds thousands of free downloadable items to its website

Hundreds of thousands of eBooks, audio books, songs and movies are now available for local residents to download or stream free – if they have a Charleston County Public Library card.
  

 

In addition to the free digital services already offered through CCPL’s website, the library has added new downloadable and streaming materials from hoopla digital. This new service includes:

  • More than 100,000 eBooks 
  • More than 33,000 audio books 
  • More than 275,000 albums 
  • More than 11,000 movies 
  • More than 1,300 television shows 
  • More than 6,000 comic books

This is in addition to the more than 10,000 eBooks, 4,000 audio books, nine million songs, nearly 200 different magazine titles and thousands of films already offered for free download by visiting the library’s website and clicking the Downloadable Media link in the left vertical color bar to explore all the options available any time of the day or night.
   

A free hoopla mobile app lets users easily download items to their iOS or Android devices, or users can click on the hoopladigital.com webpage link on the library’s Downloadable Media page to download items to their computer or mobile device. Additionally, hoopla includes a ‘Kids Mode’ option that allows parents to limit a child’s browsing to content designed specifically for a younger audience.

With hoopla, residents can check out up to 10 items per calendar month. Checkout periods are:

  • eBooks, audio books and comics - 21 days
  • Music - seven days
  • Movies and Television Shows - three days

There is no waiting period for popular titles on hoopla digital, and the automatic return function prevents late fees. Essentially, CCPL customers can access hoopla content whenever they want, wherever they want. If you want to download or stream items, but don’t have a library card, stop by any of CCPL’s 16 branch locations or complete an application online. Cards are free for Charleston County residents, business owners, property owners, students, teachers of accredited K-12 grade schools, members of the military and employees of Charleston County.

Visit the library’s Downloadable Media page to check out all the free digital materials available.

 

 

Folly Beach Library to open Monday at 2 p.m.

Monday, June 29

Folly Beach Library will open at 2 p.m. today. The delayed opening is due to the temporary closing of Folly Road following a gas leak this morning. 

Late fine increased to 20 cents per day


On August 6, Charleston County Public Library increased its fine for late materials to 20 cents per day from the original 15 cents per day, but the maximum fine for a single late item remains at $5.

With the change, the library's per day late fine remains the same charged to residents returning late books at a number of county public libraries across the state, including Dorchester, Richland, Beaufort, Lexington, Aiken, Edgefield, Hampton and others. Some libraries charge up to $1 per day for late DVDs, CDs and videos, but CCPL's late fine is 20 cents per day for all items. As part of CCPL's continuing effort to encourage reading by the area's youth, the library is continuing to waive late fees for children’s materials checked out on a children's library card.

There are a number of ways to avoid late fines. Charleston County residents can get a PIN number to access their account through the library's online catalog. By logging in, users can renew items twice, if there isn't a waiting list for the item. To get a PIN number, residents should contact their local branch library.

Residents also can receive reminders before an item’s due date through a free online service, Library Elf. Once registered, customers can get emails or text messages to track the status of hold requests and receive reminder alerts about due dates. To make it easy on families with multiple library cards, Library Elf can create a consolidated list of books checked out, due dates and hold requests.


Book Discussions planned at 10 library branches 

Library locations          Book Discussion Questions

Bring a friend or meet new ones as we get together to discuss the images and issues raised in Julie Dash’s Daughters of the Dust. Set in the 1920s on a South Carolina sea island, the book follows the complex story of the Peazant family. Set 24 years after Dash’s film, the book follows the journey of a Peazant descendant who returns to the island to learn more about her family and history. 

Tuesday, September 6 from 6:30-7:30 p.m.
Mt. Pleasant Regional Library

Thursday, September 8 from 6-7 p.m.
Otranto Regional Library

Thursday, September 8 from 6-7 p.m.
Edisto Branch

Wednesday, September 14 from 6-7 p.m.
James Island Library

Monday, September 19 from 6:30-7:30 p.m.
Cooper River Memorial Library

Tuesday, September 20 from 6-7 p.m.
Main Library

Thursday, September 22 from 6:30-7:30 p.m.
John L. Dart Library

Saturday, September 24 from 3-4 p.m.
Dorchester Regional Library

Tuesday, September 27 from 2-3 p.m.
St. Andrews Regional Library

Thursday, September 29 from 6-7 p.m.
John's Island Regional Library

 
 
 
 
FIRST Robotics Fair Saturday at Main Library
Auditorium from 1 - 3 p.m.

Join FIRST Robotics Competition Team 3489 Category 5 for an afternoon of science and technology designed for all ages. Interact with robotics, and explore the world of engineering by visiting one of many activity stations or participating in a demonstration. There also will be demonstrations of two competition robots.

What is FIRST? FIRST (First Inspiration Recognition of Science and Technology) is an international non-profit robotics organization that promotes science, engineering, technology and math (STEM) education through the excitement of robots and competition for students ages pre-K through high school. Teams are operated by adult volunteers or mentors that are professionals in STEM careers.

FIRST Robotics Competition (FRC) Team 3489 Category 5 is one of eight high school robotics teams within the Lowcountry and consists of students primarily from Summerville and Ashley Ridge High Schools.

Why is FRC Team 3489 working with CCPL to host a FIRST Robotics Fair? Team 3489 promotes STEM education in the community to show students and families that learning is fun.

For more information about this fun, educational event, call 805-6930.
Programs honor Emanuel victims

As we approach the first anniversary of the Emanuel AME Church shooting on June 17, Charleston County Public Library is planning several special events and programs to honor the nine Charlestonians who lost their lives, including a 31-year library employee.

Cynthia Graham Hurd, manager of the St. Andrews Regional Library, was one of nine individuals who died during the shocking church shooting. During the past year, local residents have shared stories about Cynthia, how she touched their lives, how she taught them to read and how the time she spent and the interest she showed helped many of them turn their lives around and reach for their dreams. Read more about Cynthia's service at the library and to the community.

During June, the library is offering special programs, exhibits and a month-long book drive to bring the community together to talk about what we've learned in the past year and how we can continue the legacy of those killed far too young. Check out the programs below, and join us.  

 
   

BOOK DRIVE:

CharlestonStrong Book Drive – Honoring Cynthia Graham Hurd 
Throughout June
       • 
Dorchester Road Regional Library – 6325 Dorchester Road: 843-552-6466
       • 
Hurd/St. Andrews Regional Library – 1735 N. Woodmere Drive: 843-766-2546
       • 
John’s Island Regional Library – 3531 Maybank Highway: 843-559-1945
       • 
Main Library – 68 Calhoun Street, downtown: 843-805-6930
       • 
Mt. Pleasant Regional Library – 1133 Mathis Ferry Road: 843-849-6161
       • 
Otranto Road Regional Library
 – 2261 Otranto Road: 843-572-4094
Continue the work of Cynthia Graham Hurd by donating new and gently used children’s books that will be given to students in kindergarten through fifth grade in Charleston County’s Title 1 elementary schools. This project is a partnership of the Cynthia Graham Hurd Foundation for Literacy and Civic Engagement, Reading Partners Charleston, Live5 WCSC-TV and Charleston County Public Library. 
Read more about the book drive spearheaded by Cynthia's siblings.


EXHIBITS:
 

The Life and Legacy of Cynthia Graham Hurd 
Throughout June 
Main Library Lobby – 68 Calhoun Street, downtown: 805-6930 
Experience the impact Cynthia Graham Hurd continues to have through an exhibit of photographs documenting her career with CCPL and memorial materials expressing an outpouring of love, sympathy and respect for the 31-year librarian and the legacy she created through the lives she touched in the Charleston community and around the country.


Kindred Kids Woven Mandala 
Throughout June 
Main Library Auditorium
 – 68 Calhoun Street, downtown: 805-6930 
View this mandala woven by students in the WINGS Kindred Kids program from North Charleston Elementary and Mason Prep School. This student partnership emerged in the wake of the June 2015 Mother Emanuel church shooting to help kids from diverse backgrounds understand each other and themselves in new ways. For more information, visit http://www.wingsforkids.org/kindred_kids

PROGRAMS:

A Moment of Silence ... to Read 
Saturdays, June 4, 11, 18 and 25 
John L. Dart Library – 1067 King Street: 722-7550 
Sign a daily reading pledge, and start reading. While supplies last, youth participants will receive a free book donated by sisters and brothers of the late Cynthia Graham Hurd.

 

 

Learn about windmills in early S.C.
Flood Recovery Resources

From all of us at CCPL, we send our thoughts to all of the South Carolinans that have been affected by the historic flooding. We hope to help you by providing this list of resources for our community. 

To Get Help
To apply for federal disaster assistance for individuals, visit www.disasterassistance.gov or call 1-800-621-FEMA (1-800-621-3362). Please have this list of items ready before you call.
 
Charleston County residents can call their local municipality for help with damage assessment. Residents who need information should call:

• City of Charleston: 843-724-7320
• Isle of Palms: 843-886-9912
• Kiawah: 843-768-9166
• Mount Pleasant: 843-884-5184
• North Charleston: 843-740-2564
• Sullivan's Island: 843-740-2564
• Unincorporated areas in Charleston County: 843-202-6930

American Red Cross of the Palmetto SC Region – To seek assistance, contact 843-764-2323 or see www.redcross.org/local/sc for full contact information. List of shelters in South Carolina

Trident United Way's 2-1-1 Hotline can provide non-emergency assistance including crisis intervention and help finding recovery resources in the local community.

The Prosperity Centers provide emergency assistance and referrals for basic needs services.

Berkeley County Prosperity Center
325 Main Street
Moncks Corner, SC
843-761-6033

Dorchester County Prosperity Center
222 Old Trolley Road
Summerville, SC
843-282-6294

Give Help
If you'd like to donate to assist flooding victims, the South Carolina Emergency Management Division has a list of Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster on their website at www.scemd.org/recovery-section
 
Tri-County Flood Recovery Fund - a partnership between Trident United Way and The Post and Courier. TUW will match dollar for dollar any funds donated by the public up to $100,000. - www.tuw.org/floodrecovery
 
Volunteer opportunities are available through Trident United Way. Contact Melissa Britton at 843-740-7741 or mbritton@tuw.org, or call the 2-1-1 Hotline, to learn about volunteer opportunities.
 
American Red Cross of the Palmetto SC Region are accepting donations for the South Carolina Flooding online at www.redcross.org/local/sc/south-carolina-flooding

Other Helpful Resources

Recovering Personal Items Following a Flood
A list of resources and helpful tips for dealing recovering personal items following a flood. 

Beware of Disaster Relief Scams

Senior Summer Reading Challenge: July 1-31
 
Summer Reading isn't just for kids. It's for you, too.  

Have fun, stimulate your mind and complete challenges for chances to win prizes this summer. Finish as many items listed as you can, and mark each task that you complete. Prefer to go paperless? Register online as an adult at www.ccpl.org/summeronline, then record your activities in the Senior Summer Reading Mission. Receive a prize drawing entry for each 10 items you complete! 


Return your completed sheet to any CCPL branch, email it to  SeniorSummerReading@ccpl.org, 
or mail it to the address listed below, postmarked by August 2.

Adult Services
Charleston County Public Library 
68 Calhoun Street 
Charleston, SC 29401 

Don't forget, you also can participate in CCPL's Adult Summer Reading Program - Reading Wave - to win more prizes. Visit any CCPL branch for details, or click here.

Questions? Email SeniorSummerReading@ccpl.org or call (843) 805-6840. 
Family Storytelling Workshop June 13

Main Library
June 13 from 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m.


Learn from the best as professional storyteller Tim Lowry offers tips and information on how you can craft and record your family stories to save for future generations. 

From 10 a.m.-12 p.m., Lowry will explain how classic folk tales can be used as a basic structure for developing and preserving family stories. From 1-5:30 p.m., interested participants can spend one-on-one time with Lowry learning how to use simple devices, like a smartphone, to record and save their stories. Recordings will be emailed to individuals after the workshop. Attend all day, or just the morning session.

Registration is required; email charlestontells@ccpl.org or call 805-6884 to register. Learn more about Tim 
on his website and check him out on YouTube.

Protect Yourself Against Identity Theft
Library Board meeting June 27 at 5:15 p.m.
Library Board meetings are held for the purpose of conducting business necessary for the operations of the public library system in Charleston County. 

Next meeting:  

Tuesday, June 27 at 5:15 p.m. in the 
Main Library Auditorium - Board Packet


John L. Dart Library delayed opening Jan. 17

John L. Dart Library will not open until 11 a.m. on Saturday, January 17 due to the Charleston Marathon.   

Daughters of the Dust: Book Discussion Questions
1.

In the opening section of the book, “Dawtuh Island, 1912: Telling the Lie,” Miz Emma Julia “tells a lie” to a young Elizabeth and her siblings and cousins. It is about an old lady who lives alone in the woods who is advised by the elephants that what she needs is kin. They tell her how to create kin by baking hickory nuts. But they warn her, “Kin is fine, but kin can be trouble.” What happens when the old lady creates a family, and how does this “lie” prepare readers for the story of Elizabeth and Amelia and their families?

2.

Many of the characters in Daughters of the Dust are related by marriage or birth, but live in different settings and circumstances. Consider the Peazants on Dawtuh Island; Haagar, Amelia, and her parents in Harlem; Iona and Julien Last Child’s extended family; Haagar’s kin in Hog Alley; and the Bouvier sisters in Charleston. Each group in the book has its own code of rules for family and society. How are they similar? How are they different? How do you account for the differences?

3.

When Amelia first arrives on Dawtuh Island in 1926 to collect information for her college thesis, Elizabeth, who has just returned from school on the mainland to live on the island, notes that she “felt a certain envy that everything Amelia would see would be new, while Elizabeth struggled for ways to see new things about the old.” How does this statement sum up these two characters’ experiences?

4.

When Elizabeth/Lil Bet was twelve, her parents were presented with the opportunity to send her to finish her education at the Avery Normal School in Charleston. Do you think that Eli and Eula would have decided to send her if she hadn’t been discovered in the woods with Sugarnun? How would her life have been different if she had remained on Dawtuh Island?

5.

Amelia seeks out Jackson Devries, her great grandfather, in Hog Alley.  When she finally confronts him, he tells his story of the Devries, that “What Devries got, dey hold, and all us Devries got a taste for dey own.”  What do you think Ol Jackson means by this, and does Haagar display this same “Devries” behavior?

6.

In Daughters of the Dust, there is a common character theme of duality, reminiscent of Nella Larsen’s Passing. In Passing, the protagonist is Clare Kendry, a fair-skinned African American woman who can “pass” for white, and does so.  She comes in contact with someone from her past who reminds her of the world she has left behind, and she is conflicted, caught between the “white” and “black” worlds. How are Elizabeth, Amelia, Myown, and even Haagar dealing with these issues of being in two worlds (island vs. mainland/ traditional vs. modern)?

7.

Ol Trent has a particularly tragic story in Daughters of the Dust.  He marries Miss Evangeline, a white woman from Charleston, in Paris. When she discovers he is really a Wilkerson from Dawtuh Island, a black man, she returns in great confusion without him to America. Ol Trent follows her, they resume their relationship, and he is punished for the forbidden relationship by a shot to the head.  He is left an anxious man who can only quote Bible verses.  Seeing the guilt and misery that both Trent and Miss Evangeline live with, Elizabeth “wondered if this is what came of seeking your dreams; a prison of someone else’s making.” What does she mean by this?

8.

Amelia’s family’s move to New York can be placed in the context of America’s Great Migration, the decades-long movement of African Americans during the twentieth century from the rural South to the cities of the North and the West to find a better life. Many families were separated by this migration. The wall of letters at Nana’s house on Dawtuh Island reflects this fact of the characters’ lives. Looking at the wall and contemplating her future, Elizabeth wonders, “What was worse, being just another letter on the wall, or one of those eagerly waiting for the letters to come?” What answer does Dash’s novel seem to suggest? Do you agree?

9.

Ben Peazant tells the story of Ibo Landing and concludes that “everbody have a different story.  Some folks say dey walk across de water to Ibo land, some folks say dey fly back, odders say dey walk into de water and drown … I like to tink dey walk back.” Discuss the differing accounts of the Ibo Landing story. Which one resonates with you? Why?

10.

Amelia’s research creates a structure through which many characters are able to tell a story. Which story did you most enjoy? How did it help you understand that character and his or her cultural heritage? What does this structure tell us about the importance of stories?

11.

Why do you suppose telling a story is called “telling a lie?”

12.

At the end of the novel, Amelia is offered the opportunity to share the story of Dawtuh Island and its people with a larger audience, and she decides not to do so. Why? The Works Progress Administration interviews of former slaves, conducted during the 1930s, are today considered to be a valuable historical record of a people whose voices and stories might have otherwise been lost to the ages. Do you agree with her decision and her reasoning in making it?

13.

In Daughters of the Dust, Haagar’s family moves “up north” but maintains some of the practices from the island, such as putting salt in the corners and placing a broom by the door. What other practices do you recall from the book? Are there any traditions in your family that have ties to Gullah culture? How do you find the Gullah culture infused in Charleston today?

14.

Elizabeth's herbal charms are treasured by her family and neighbors on the island for their traditional powers of healing and protection, whereas the Bouvier sisters and Natalie appreciate them as decorative objects. Discuss the intrinsic value of the charms and how that differs for each group.

15.

The Gullah language came into being on the isolated sea islands of South Carolina and Georgia. It is believed to be a merging of the various languages of the African tribes forced into slavery and the English language. Daughters of the Dust incorporates the actual Gullah dialect in the book. How did this impact your reading of the book? Did you find yourself trying to speak the words out loud? Some of the phrases are unique: “to tell a lie” is to tell a story, “day clean” describes daybreak. What other phrases do you remember from the book, and what do you think they mean?

16.

Religious syncretism is the blending of two or more religious systems. The Gullah tradition meshes Conjure, African Gods, Islam, Christianity, and Native American traditions. What blending of these religious traditions do you remember from the book? How do the characters' lives reflect this blend of religious traditions?

17.

We learn that the American Missionary Society was teaching the children on Dawtuh Island, but the teachers were asked to leave “because they were making the colored children smart, and too many were crossing over to go to the colored high school on the mainland.”  Because of this, the public school board replaces the AMS, and Elizabeth is instructed by the board director to “teach the children only enough.”  Is this the reason why Lil Bet has a problem teaching and reaching the children?

18.

Did you know that Julie Dash wrote the screenplay, directed, and produced the film Daughters of the Dust in 1991 and then wrote the book of the same title in 1997? The film is set in 1878, and the book picks up with the same characters 24 years later. Have you seen the film? Were the characters in the film as you imagined from reading the book? Did the film’s imagery capture the essence of the Sea Islands as you know them today?

 
 
CCPL selected for national internship program
Joins 38 other libraries in 25 U.S. states in hosting interns from diverse backgrounds

CHARLESTON, SC - Charleston County Public Library (CCPL) will participate in a connected learning summer internship program sponsored by the Public Library Association (PLA), a division of the American Library Association (ALA). Through its Inclusive Internship Initiative (III), PLA is sponsoring paid, mentored public library internships for 50 high school juniors and seniors from diverse backgrounds nationwide. With individual guidance from a mentor, CCPL's intern will engage with multiple facets of library life, including programming, user services and administrative operations. Over the course of the summer, the intern and mentor will also develop program guides for new library branches, which were approved for construction through the 2014 referendum.

CCPL has selected Shanequa Rainey as its summer 2017 intern. Rainey will enter her senior year at Burke High School this fall. She was selected based upon her academic standing, application essay, interview and letter of recommendation. Rainey will work closely with her appointed mentor, Outreach and Programming Librarian Megan Summers, throughout the internship. Summers and Rainey will travel to Washington, D.C. later this month for III's summer kickoff event.

This internship project will immediately benefit the participating students and libraries. Library staff will better understand how to foster early career pathways to librarianship while also gaining appreciation for their own roles and efforts to support diversity along those paths. Students will learn about the many ways librarians positively serve their communities and also gain tools to determine their educational goals and potential interest in future library service or leadership roles. Interns and mentors will have opportunities to connect with their counterparts at participating libraries across the country.

This program is funded by PLA with support from a pre-professional Laura Bush 21st Century Librarian Program Grant (grant RE-00-17-0129-17) from the Institute of Museum and Library Services.

For additional information about the Inclusive Internship Initiative, click here https://apply.ala.org/plinterns.

 

 

CCPL offers eclipse programs and glasses


Contact: Natalie Hauff, PR Manager
Phone: 843-805-6817
Email: hauffn@ccpl.org

CCPL offers free solar eclipse programs and safety glasses
Click here to learn how to get your free safety glasses and review a schedule of eclipse-related events at your local CCPL branch.

CHARLESTON, SC - Charleston County Public Library (CCPL) will provide numerous opportunities in August for residents of all ages to learn about the upcoming solar eclipse and pick up a pair of free safety glasses.

A total eclipse of the sun will be visible Aug. 21 in the continental United States for the first time in almost 40 years. Eclipse-themed events at CCPL branches include a hands-on activity session with NASA specialists, lectures by College of Charleston Astronomy Department representatives, crafts, stories, and the distribution of thousands of free glasses to safely view the solar eclipse.

"This historic event is an opportunity to connect with our patrons and equip them with useful knowledge about this rare occurrence," said CCPL Executive Director Nicolle Davies. "We're also thrilled to give away solar eclipse glasses in order to promote safe viewing practices."

Free safety glasses will be available to pick up at CCPL branches that host eclipse-related events in August. Glasses will be distributed to program attendees while supplies last.

 The only safe way to look directly at an uneclipsed or partially eclipsed sun is through special purpose solar filters, such as eclipse glasses or handheld solar viewers. The safety glasses distributed by CCPL feature scratch-resistant polymer lenses that filter out 100% of harmful ultra-violet and infrared rays and 99.999% of intense visible light. The glasses are generously provided by the Space Science Institute, which is supported by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Google, National Science Foundation and NASA.

Weather permitting, the eclipse will be visible across all of North America. The entire continent will experience a partial eclipse lasting two to three hours. Anyone within a 70-milewide path that stretches through 14 states, including South Carolina, will experience a total eclipse. During those brief moments when the moon completely blocks the sun's bright face for about two minutes, day will turn into night and the solar corona, the sun's outer atmosphere, will become visible along with bright stars and planets.

Library Board Meeting March 22

The Library's Board of Trustees meets to conduct business necessary for the operations of the public library system in Charleston County. The meetings are scheduled monthly on the 4th Tuesday at 5:15 p.m., except when there is a conflict due to a holiday or when there is a deadline that requires board action.  

Board Meeting:
March 22 at Mt. Pleasant Regional Library - Board Packet


Exhibit explores Daufuskie Island's rich Gullah heritage  

Learn more about the photographer

Photographer Jeanne Moutoussamy-Ashe captured life on Daufuskie
Charleston County Main Library Lobby, 68 Calhoun Street
September 1-30, 2011
 

In the early 1980s, Daufuskie Island stood alone as the last South Carolina sea island untouched by the outside world, serving as a home to residents whose Gullah lifestyle, traditions and language were preserved because of their isolation. Recognizing this unique culture and the need to capture this way of life, Jeanne Moutoussamy-Ashe used her camera to chronicle the life of the island. Visiting Daufuskie several times, she found residents living with little or no electricity, using ox-drawn carts for transportation, cooking over open fires and sending their children to a one-room schoolhouse. Living on a sea island and separated from the outside world, these African descendants continued practicing their native traditions, even creating their own language by mixing English and West African languages. Today, the Daufuskie Island witnessed by Moutoussamy-Ashe is just a memory, lost to the pressures of development that displaced the island’s inhabitants with hotels and manicured lawns.



Girl in Screen door
by Jeanne Moutoussamy-Ashe




Miss Bertha
by Jeanne Moutoussamy-Ashe




Susie on the front porch cleaning crab
by Jeanne Moutoussamy-Ashe


About the photographer
Photographer Jeanne Moutoussamy-Ashe uses her photography to educate the world civic causes, including health, arts, education and urban issues. The widow of tennis great Arthur Ashe, her work has appeared in Life, Smithsonian, Sports Illustrated, Ebony, Essence, People and The New York Times and has been in exhibitions around the world. Author of five books, her effort to capture the life and culture of Gullah residents living on a South Carolina sea island was published originally in 1982 in Daufuskie Island: Photographs by Jeanne Moutoussamy-Ashe and was republished in a 25th Anniversary Edition in 2007. Moutoussamy-Ashe is director of the Arthur Ashe Endowment for the Defeat of AIDS, a former trustee and member of the President’s Council of The Cooper Union and is founder and president of the Arthur Ashe Learning Center.

 

 

Library Board Meeting on August 25

The Library's Board of Trustees meets to conduct business necessary for the operations of the public library system in Charleston County. The meetings are scheduled monthly on the 4th Tuesday at 5:15 pm, except when there is a conflict by a holiday or when there is a deadline requiring board action. 

Board Meeting:
August 25 at Main Library - Agenda

Learn about new St. Paul's library design

Charleston County Public Library hosted a community meeting on Tuesday, June 12 to share information with the public about updated designs for the new St. Paul's Branch library. Local residents overwhelmingly approved a referendum in November 2014 to build five new Charleston County Public Library branches and renovate 13 others. Behind-the-scenes progress has been made on the library building projects since then, and residents who attended the community meeting had an opportunity to listen to a presentation by the architects and participate in a question and answer session with CCPL and Charleston County Government staff.

Meeting date/location:
Monday, June 12 at 7 p.m.
E.B. Ellington Elementary School Cafeteria
5540 Old Jacksonboro Road, Ravenel

Click here to view the architects' presentation.

Additional community meetings will be scheduled to share design plans for the new Cooper River and West Ashley libraries as the respective design teams for each site reach the necessary stage in the planning process. To learn more about the construction and renovation plan, view a map and see a breakdown of the estimated costs, visit http://bit.ly/1nw9TB4.


Avery hosts two-day Symposium

Speakers will focus on movie's impact within American culture
Celebrating the 20th anniversary of the release of Julie Dash’s film, the College of Charleston’s Avery Research Center is bringing together scholars and artists from throughout the country for a two-day symposium on September 16-17 to reflect on the film’s impact on society, race, gender, class and the lives of African American women. The sessions play homage to the African American art aesthetic, the creative expression of feminist criticism and the untold story of a rich, but forgotten, cultural legacy of our shared American heritage. This free symposium is being co-sponsored by the Carolina Low Country and Atlantic World (CLAW) Program, the African American Studies Program (ASST), The International African American Museum (IAAM) and the S.C. Historical Society. For registration information, contact the Avery Research Center at (843) 953-7234


Schedule of events:

Friday, September 16 

8:30 a.m.           Registration
9 a.m.     

Welcome and Opening:
College of Charleston Provost George Hynd,
Dr. Patricia Williams-Lessane and
Dr. Conseula Francis

9:15 a.m.     

Dreaming Julie Dash: Situating Daughters of    
the Dust
 within the Black Film Aesthetic

11 a.m.     

In Search of Our Mothers: Movement and Migration
in Daughters of the Dust

12:30 p.m.                

Lunch Keynote: Yvonne Welbon, Bennett College for Women, Behind the Screen: The Making, Marketing and Distribution of
Daughters of the Dust

2 p.m.        How I’ve Come By My Name
3:45 p.m.    Gullah Art: Presentation, Preservation and Interpretation
5:30 p.m.                 

Novel Interpretations of Daughters of the Dust

                  Saturday, September 17 
9 a.m. 

From The Color Purple to For Colored Girls:
Film as the New Literary Genre

11:45 a.m.

Weaving a Tapestry: Daughters of the Dust and Material Culture

12:30 p.m. 

Lunch Keynote: Julie Dash, producer/writer/director of Daughters of the Dust

2 p.m. 

Reflections: “We Carry These Memories Inside of We”

3:45 p.m.  Daughters of the Dust: A Metapicture of Culture and Gender
   
   
   
   
Dart Mural reflects Cynthia Graham Hurd's joy

Friends, family and co-workers gathered Monday at the John L. Dart Branch Library to honor one of those lost in the Emanuel AME Church shootings by dedicating a bright, wall-sized, geometric mural in her honor.

Cynthia Graham Hurd was full of life, full of joy and full of love for the Charleston County Public Library and all those who visited the branches she worked at or managed in her 31 years with the library. For more than 20 of those years, she worked at or managed the Dart Branch - the very branch that this self-proclaimed book nerd visited as a child growing up in Charleston's neck area.

Celeste Laribo performs 

"The mural is a beacon," said current Dart Manager Kim Odom, a close friend who considered Cynthia a mentor. "It brings people to one of the places she loved most in the neighborhood she grew up in. This is always where you'd find Cynthia. She'd be here among children, doing what she love while engaging and serving the people she loved." 

   
Kim Odom remembers Cynthia Graham Hurd


According to Odom, it "expresses the joy that Cynthia expressed," and Monday's event allowed the people who loved Cynthia to come together and honor her legacy. "The event and the love shared during the dedication took my breath away"

Creating the mural, finding the artist and getting the funds were a true community effort. It was a collaboration between Charleston County Public Library, Enough Pie and was partially funded by donations from Winston & Strawn LLP.

The artist, Nick Kuszyk, aka R. ROBOTS, painted the bright, colorful mural on the south side of the John L. Dart Branch Library earlier this year. The New York resident is known for doing large public art projects, and his paintings grace walls in Berlin, Prague, London, Tel Aviv and throughout the United States.
  

"The mural serves as a bright, colorful invitation for all to come inside and experience the wonders of the library and explore books," said Cathryn Zommer with Enough Pie, an organization that is spearheading community improvements in the area and that helped back the creation of the mural. 

During Cynthia's 31 years at the library, she touched the lives of thousands of people - encouraging children during their earliest days as new readers and then watching them return with homework assignments, to fill out applications for colleges and jobs and, ultimately, with children of their own. 

    
Wendell Gilliard presents resolution to Dart staff
  
So, you want to be a YA author?
Indie Authors Day: December 10

Celebrate authors, and join discussions about fiction, non-fiction, history, poetry, and the art of illustration. The event includes a keynote webinar presented by publishing and self-publishing industry representatives, an attorney and a prominent author. Books by featured authors will be available to purchase, and a portion of proceeds will go toward Charleston Friends of the Library. See detailed session descriptions below.

Fiction with L. Penelope
Meeting Room B from 9:15 a.m.-10:15 a.m.
L. Penelope is the 2016 American Library Association Black Caucus Self-Published book award winner for Song of Blood and Stone: Earthsinger Chronicles. She will read a short excerpt from her work, provide online marketing tips and discuss the craft of writing fiction in fantasy, paranormal and romance genres.

Illustrating Children's Books with Baird Hoffmire
Meeting Room A from 9:15 a.m-10:15 p.m.
Baird Hoffmire is the illustrator and author of Boris Crookedback and the Dragon of Wang-Dang-Baloo. He will read an excerpt from his book and share his varied experiences in the field of illustration.
 
Non-Fiction: African-American History and Culture Writing in the Lowcountry with Sherman Pyatt
Meeting Room A from 10:15 a.m. -11:15 a.m.
Sherman Pyatt is a local history writer who explores African-American cuisine, folk culture and history in his latest work, The Other Side of the Skillet: Healthy and Alternative Eating in The Lowcountry. Pyatt also authored and co-authored eight other books. He will share his experiences as a writer, researcher and chronicler of African-American folk life.

Science Fiction with Tony Bertauski
Meeting Room B from 10:15 a.m.-11:15 p.m.
Join a discussion of the ups and downs of writing in the science-fiction/dystopian genre. An author of 12 novels and S.C. Fiction Open winner (2008), Bertauski also has published two textbooks in landscape design and is the gardening columnist for the Post and Courier.

Poetry with Marcus Amaker
Meeting Room B from 11:15 a.m. -12:15 p.m.
Multi-talented Marcus Amaker is Poet Laureate of the City of Charleston, author of seven books of poetry, and creator of various music and graphic arts. He will discuss the craft of poetry writing and read from Mantra, his latest work. The following media outlets have featured poetry by Amaker: PBS News Hour, Huffington Post, Charleston Magazine, Post and Courier, Charleston City Paper, and the Art Mag. 
 
Indie Authors Webinar
Meeting Room B from 12:15 p.m. -1:15 p.m.
Join a webinar that offers insight from practitioners in the fields of law, publishing, collection development, literary review sources and libraries, along with an award-winning self-published author. Learn about opportunities to write, share work and gain audiences through publishing platforms.

Suggested Reading List

Check these out to learn more about Gullah culture  

 

Nonfiction     Fiction      Selections for Children      Audio Visual      Biography

Nonfiction

Sea Island roots: African Presence in the Carolinas and Georgia
Mary A. Twining
975 Sea

Ain't You Got a right to the Tree of Life: the People of
Johns Island, South Carolina-their Faces, their Words, and their Songs 

Guy Carawan
975.700496 Carawan

Reminiscences of Sea Island Heritage   

Ronald Daise 975.799 Daise

Gullah Branches, West African Roots
Ronald Daise
305.896 Daise

When Roots Die: Endangered Traditions on the Sea Islands
Patricia Jones-Jackson
306.0975 Jones

The Legacy of Ibo Landing: Gullah Roots of African American Culture
Marquetta L.Goodwine
975.799 Legacy

Gulluh fuh oonuh = Gullah for You: a Guide to the Gullah Language
Virginia Mixson Geraty
427.975799 Geraty

Daufuskie Island: Photographs 25th Anniversary Edition
Jeanne Moutoussamy-Ashe
975.799 Moutous

Daughters of the Dust: the Making of an African American Woman's Film
Julie Dash
791.4372 Dash

De Nyew Testament: the New Testament in Gullah Sea Island Creole
American Bible Society
226.2 Bible

Blue Roots: African-American Folk Magic of the Gullah People
Roger Pinckney
398.0975759 Pinckney

The Water is Wide
Pat Conroy
371.97 C

Cooking the Gullah Way, Morning, Noon, and Night
Sallie Ann Robinson
641.59296 Robinson

Gullah Cuisine: by Land and by Sea
Charlotte Jenkins
641.59757 Jenkins

My Gullah Kitchen
Eva Segar
641.59757 Segar

Sweetgrass Baskets and the Gullah Tradition
Joyce V. Coakley
746.41 Coakley

Gullah Images: the Art of Jonathan Green
Jonathan Green
759.1457 Green

A Gullah guide to Charleston: Walking through Black History
Alphonso Brown
917.57915 Brown

Fiction

Praisesong for the Widow
Paule Marshall

The Knees of Gullah Island
Dwight Fryer

The Black Border: Gullah stories of the Carolina Coast
Ambrose Elliott Gonzales

Haint Blue: a Novel
Carl E. Linke

Bright Skin: a Novel, Black April, Green Thursday, and Scarlet Sister Mary
Julia Mood Peterkin

Porgy
Dubose Heyward

Low Country
Anne Rivers Siddons

Their Eyes Were Watching God
Zora Neale Hurston

Sula
Toni Morrison

Selections for Children

Bruh Rabbit and the Tar Baby Girl
Virginia Hamilton
J 398.2 Hamilton

Bo Rabbit Smart for True: Folktales from the Gullah
Priscilla Jaquith
J 398.245 Jaq

A Gullah Alphabet
Margie Willis Clary
J 427.975799 Clary

The Water Brought Us: the Story of the Gullah-speaking People
Muriel Miller Branch
J 975.799 Branch

Gullah Night before Christmas
Virginia Mixson Geraty Juvenile Fiction

Little Muddy Waters: a Gullah Folk Tale
Ronald Daise Juvenile Fiction

Spooky Tales from Gullah Gullah Island
Hettie Jones Juvenile Fiction

Tales from the Land of Gullah for Kids [DVD]
Anita Singleton-Prather
J 398.20975799 Tales

Audio/Visual

Daughters of the Dust [DVD]
Dash, Julie

Roots of Rhythm [DVD]
Plantation Singers
782.253 Plantati

Family Across the Sea [DVD]
Domino Boulware
975.7 Family

Songs uv dee Gullah Pee'puls [CD]
Gullah Kinfolk
782.253 Songs

Library Database
www.ccpl.org
Oxford African American Studies Center

Biography

Gullah Statesman: Robert Smalls from Slavery to Congress, 1839-1915
Edward A. Miller
B Smalls

Coming Through: Voices of a South Carolina Gullah Community from WPA Oral Histories
Genevieve W. Chandler
975.789 Coming

 

 
 
 
 
About Filmmaker/Author Julie Dash

Dash turned to family roots as inspiration for film/book

Born and raised in New York City, Julie Dash was introduced to the Gullah culture by her father and her relatives. Through their stories of life in the Gullah community, Dash learned about Gullah cooking, the language and their unique way of looking at the world.

In her 1992 book, Daughters of the Dust: The Making of an African American Woman’s Story, Dash says she was introduced to filmmaking at 17. Finding her life’s passion, she studied film at the City College of New York, then moved to California, accepted a fellowship at the American Film Institute and received her masters at the University of California, Los Angeles.


“I always knew I wanted to make films about African American women. To tell stories that had not been told. To show images of our lives that had not been seen,” Dash says.

Remembering the stories of her youth, Dash first thought of making a short silent film about the migration of an African American family.

"I was making notes from stories and phrases I heard around my family, and became fascinated by a series of James Van Der Zee photos of black women at the turn of the century. The images and ideas combined and grew."

Once sparked, Dash began her research by approaching her relatives.

“When things got too personal, too close to memories they didn’t want to reveal, they would close up, push me away, tell me to go ask someone else. I knew then that the images I wanted to show, the story I wanted to tell, had to touch an audience the way it touched my family.”

In the late 1980s, Dash wrote the script and secured $800,000 to film on St. Helena and Hunting islands. Completed in 1991, she joined the festival circuit searching for a distributor. At her first festival, Sundance, the film drew praise and won for best cinematography.

When the movie opened nationwide in January 1992, Dash said she was filled with emotion.

“I was moved by the emotion on the faces of the    people, especially older African Americans; I was proud to be contributing to the growing power of African American filmmakers, telling the stories of our people; and I was relieved that the voices of our women were finally being heard.”
 

 

 

 
 
 
A Prince Among Slaves program
  

A Prince Among Slaves: A Film Screening and Discussion with Dr. Artemus Gaye
Artemus Gaye knew he descended from slaves, but it took a civil war in his native Liberia, eight trips to Mississippi and years of research to discover he is also descended from royalty.  Gaye traced back his ancestry and found that he is the seventh-generation descendant of Abduhl Rahahman, a West African prince-turned-slave who is the subject of the documentary film, “Prince Among Slaves.”

Saturday, February 11 at 6 p.m.
John’s Island Library

Sunday, February 12 at 3 p.m.
Main Library

Village Branch closed April 17-22
CCPL's Village Branch, located at 430 Whilden Street in Mt. Pleasant, will be closed April 17-22 for maintenance repairs.

To access on-site library services, materials and assistance until the Village Branch reopens April 24, please visit one of CCPL's nearby locations. For more information about library locations and services, browse the library's website or call 843-805-6930.

Charleston International Film Festival tickets
The Charleston International Film Festival is November 4-8 at the Charleston Music Hall in downtown Charleston, and by showing a CCPL library card at the Music Hall box office, CCPL members can receive free entry to all documentary film screenings and half-price entry to all other film screenings (excluding the opening night reception).

The Festival showcases features, shorts, documentaries and animations from around the country and world. Visit www.CharlestonIFF.org for a complete schedule of films, events and free workshops.

Book on Downtown Scavenger Hunt




Take the Library challenge, and Book On Downtown 
Participate in a scavenger hunt throughout June for a chance to win prizes and learn about people who have made a difference in the world. Pick up a scorecard at any CCPL branch or download a scorecard here, then enter the names of the people featured on the Book On Downtown posters displayed at various businesses in downtown Charleston. Cards must be turned in at a CCPL branch library by June 30. Multiple prizes will be awarded, and one lucky winner will receive the top prize of $100 provided by the Charleston Friends of the Library. Prizes will be awarded by random drawing of submitted answer cards with the most correct answers. 

Visit Charleston County Public Library and these participating  local businesses to join the fun! 

Book on Downtown - online version
CCPL now offers an online version of the scavenger hunt for those unable to participate in the search downtown. Click here to download the online scorecard, and follow CCPL on Facebook (facebook.com/ChasCoLibrary) and Twitter (twitter.com/ChasCoLibrary) to view weekly posts and solve clues about influential people from around the world. Email your completed scorecard to finleym@ccpl.org by June 30. Winners will be selected randomly from submitted entry forms with the most correct answers.

*Please note that one entry is permitted per person, and participants must choose to complete either the downtown or the online version of the scavenger hunt.*
 

Solve the clues below, and enter the name of the influential person described next to the corresponding date on the online Book on Downtown scorecard.

Thursday, June 1
He campaigned for justice and freedom in his native South Africa, where he spent more than 20 years in jail for his opposition to the country's apartheid system of racial segregation. After his release, he became the first president of a democratic South Africa. He helped end the apartheid system while welcoming a peaceful transition to majority rule. He was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1993.

Friday, June 2
This person led the nonviolent civil rights movement in the late 1950s and 1960s to seek legal equality for African-Americans and improve race relations. In 1964, at 35 years old, he became the youngest person to win the Nobel Peace Prize at that time. Between 1965 and 1968, he shifted his focus to lead campaigns against poverty and international conflict.

Saturday, June 3
A Roman Catholic nun devoted her life to serving the poor and destitute around the world. She spent many years in Calcutta, India and founded the Missionaries of Charity, a religious congregation devoted to helping those in great need. In 1979, she was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize and became a symbol of charitable, selfless work. In 2016, she was canonized by the Roman Catholic Church as Saint Teresa.

Sunday, June 4
A world-famous American boxer refused to fight in the Vietnam War due to his religious principles. He was diagnosed with Parkinson's disease in 1984 and devoted much of his time to philanthropy. He was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2005 for his commitment to civil rights, equal justice and peace. When asked how he would like to be remembered, he replied, "As a man who tried to unite all humankind through faith and love."

Monday, June 5
"When I despair, I remember that all through history the ways of truth and love have always won. There have been tyrants, and murderers, and for a time they can seem invincible, but in the end they always fall. Think of it-always." This quote is from someone who worked as a lawyer, politician, social activist and writer and became the principle figurehead of the Indian independence movement. He taught a philosophy of nonviolence and peaceful protest to achieve political and social goals, and many consider him a model for positive change.

Tuesday, June 6
She escaped slavery and became a leading figure in the abolitionist movement. She helped lead hundreds of slaves to freedom using a network of anti-slavery activists and safe houses known as the Underground Railroad. She also served as a spy for the U.S. army during the Civil War, and she actively supported women's suffrage.

Wednesday, June 7
"I want to be useful or bring enjoyment to all people, even those I've never met. I want to go on living even after my death! And that's why I'm so grateful to God for having given me this gift, which I can use to develop myself and to express all that's inside me!" - This quote is from one of the most discussed Jewish victims of the Holocaust. During the Second World War, her family was forced to hide from the Gestapo, and she kept a diary of her experiences and thoughts. She gained fame posthumously following the publication of The Diary of a Young Girl, which relates her strength and courage in the face of inhumanity. 

Thursday, June 8 
This South African social activist and retired Anglican bishop was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for his human rights advocacy and opposition to South Africa's brutal apartheid regime. He has dedicated his life to promoting peace, equality and forgiveness. He received the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2009 for his efforts to create a more compassionate world.

Friday, June 9
She was a pioneer of the American civil rights movement. Her refusal to surrender her seat to a white passenger on a public bus in Montgomery, Alabama, spurred a city-wide boycott and helped launch nationwide efforts to end the racial segregation of public facilities. Her quiet courage inspired many people, and she remains a nationally recognized symbol of dignity and equality.

Saturday, June 10 
This simple Buddhist monk and spiritual leader of Tibet advocates peace, freedom and reverence for all living things. He was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1989 for his nonviolent opposition to China's occupation of Tibet. He is the first Nobel Prize laureate to be recognized for his concern for global environmental problems.

Sunday, June 11 
This Pakistani schoolgirl spoke out publicly against the Taliban's prohibition of education for girls and survived an assassination attempt by a Taliban gunman. She has since become a global advocate for human rights, education and women's rights. She is the youngest recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize, which she won in 2014.

Monday, June 12
He was an author, orator and statesman. After escaping slavery, he wrote autobiographies and gave powerful speeches about his experiences. He spoke of his hope for a nation where all people were treated equally regardless of race, gender or religion. He became a famous human rights leader through his efforts to end slavery and racism.

Tuesday, June 13 
She was a prominent abolitionist and woman's rights activist. She was born into slavery and escaped with her infant daughter to freedom in 1826. She devoted her life to ending slavery and is famous for her extemporaneous speech "Ain't I a woman?" in support of equal rights for African-Americans.

Wednesday, June 14
This Burmese activist, Nobel Peace Prize winner and Presidential Medal of Freedom recipient spent 15 years under house arrest as a political prisoner after campaigning for democratic reform and speaking out against the dictator in power. She currently rules Myanmar as State Counsellor, and has been commended for her nonviolent struggle for democracy and human rights.

Thursday, June 15
She was a Kenyan environmentalist and political activist. She founded the Green Belt Movement, a nongovernmental organization that promotes environmental conservation and women's rights. She was the first black woman and the first environmentalist to be awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, which she was received for her contribution to sustainable development, democracy and peace. 

Friday, June 16
She is an Iranian lawyer and human rights activist. She was Iran's first female judge, and she won the 2003 Nobel Peace Prize for her work promoting democracy and human rights, particularly those of women and children. She is the first female Peace Prize laureate from the Islamic world.

Saturday, June 17
"¡Si se puede!"
He was a Mexican-American union leader and labor organizer who raised awareness of the struggles experienced by Hispanic farm workers across the nation. He dedicated his life to improving treatment, pay and working conditions for farm laborers. Thanks to his nonviolent strategies, he eventually secured raises and improved conditions for farm workers in California, Texas, Arizona and Florida.

Sunday, June 18
She is a social reformer who raised global awareness of the history of oppression and violence against the Mayan people. She is a life-long advocate for women's rights and the rights of indigenous Guatemalans. She was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1992, and she later became a United Nations Ambassador for the world's indigenous peoples.

Monday, June 19
"It is not our differences that divide us. It is our inability to recognize, accept, and celebrate those differences."
She was an African-American poet, essayist and civil rights activist who gave voice to issues of race, gender and sexuality. She encouraged others to speak out against injustice, and she is remembered today as a warrior poet who valiantly fought personal and political battles with her words.

Tuesday, June 20
This influential figure in the LGBT rights movement was a veteran of the Stonewall riots for LGBT rights in New York City and one of the country's first transgender activists who worked tirelessly for justice and the civil rights of transgender people, people of color and low income queer people.

Wednesday, June 21
"We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men and women are created equal."
An American suffragist, social activist, abolitionist and leading figure of the early women's rights movement. She was the president of the National Woman Suffrage Association for 20 years and worked closely with Susan B. Anthony. Her efforts helped bring about the eventual passage of the 19th Amendment, which gave all citizens the right to vote.

Thursday, June 22
These sisters were early and prominent activists for abolition and women's rights. Raised on a plantation in South Carolina, they were disgusted by the ill treatment they witnessed, and they devoted their lives to advocating racial and gender equality.

Friday, June 23 
This American voting rights activist, civil rights leader and philanthropist worked for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, which fought racial segregation and injustice in the South. She helped African-Americans register to vote and co-founded the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party. Along with her political activism, she worked to help poor people and families in her Mississippi community. She is remembered for exclaiming, "I'm sick and tired of being sick and tired!"

Saturday, June 24
This influential civil rights activist and labor leader co-founded what would become the United Farm Workers organization to fight discrimination and improve social and economic conditions for farm workers. She has received numerous awards, including the Presidential Medal of Freedom, in recognition of her community service and advocacy for workers', immigrants' and women's rights.

Sunday, June 25 
This American civil rights activist fought the government's internment of Japanese Americans during World War II. He was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1998, and an institute in his name was founded in 2009 to carry on his legacy as a civil rights advocate by educating and advocating civil liberties for all communities.

Monday, June 26 
This lawyer, author and civil rights activist from South Carolina was the first African-American woman admitted to the Mississippi bar. She has written many inspirational and academic works about racial inequality in the United States. She is the founder and president of the Children's Defense Fund, which is the leading advocacy group for children in the United States. She was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2000 for her contributions to society.

One Book Charleston County Film Screenings

Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close
Starring Tom Hanks, Sandra Bullock and newcomer Thomas Horn.
A 2012 Academy Award nominee for Best Picture, the movie unfolds from inside the young mind of Oskar Schell, an inventive 11-year-old New Yorker. Oskar’s discovery of a key in his deceased father’s belongings triggers his search for the lock it will open. Determined to keep his vital connection to his father, Oskar crosses the five New York boroughs in quest of the missing lock, encountering an eclectic assortment of people who are each survivors in their own way. His journey helps him uncover unseen links to the father he misses, to the mother who seems far away in her own world of grief and to the whole noisy, dangerous world around him. Rated PG-13; 129 minutes.

  • Thursday, September 13 at 6:30 p.m.
    Main Library
  • Saturday, September 22 at 2 p.m.
    Otranto Road Regional
    NOTE: Screening has been cancelled due to room maintenance. 
  • Saturday, September 29 at 2 p.m.
    John’s Island Regional
  • Saturday, October 6 at 2 p.m.
    Mt. Pleasant Regional
  • Tuesday, October 9 at 5:30 p.m.
    St. Andrews Regional
  • Saturday, October 20 at 2 p.m.
    Dorchester Road Regional
    Book discussion will follow.

 


9/11 - The Filmmakers' Commemorative Edition
Originally broadcast on CBS in March 2002, this one-of-a-kind, Emmy-award-winning documentary provides an extraordinary record of events as they unfolded in New York City. On the morning of 9/11, brothers Jules and Gedeon Naudet were filming a portrait of a NYC firefighter trainee stationed just seven blocks from the World Trade Center. They soon found themselves, and their cameras, thrust into the event as they followed the city’s firefighters on one of the darkest days in history. The resulting film documents the horrific events of that day along with the amazing courage and bravery of these American heroes. Not Rated; 112 minutes.

  • Tuesday, September 25 at 6:30 p.m.
    Main Library

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Charleston Tells Concert Series: Aug. 25

August 25 from 7-8:30 p.m. 
Main Library

     
68 Calhoun Street in downtown Charleston

Concert Tickets

2017 Concert Schedule


About Charleston Tells


Past Festival Highlights


Visitor Information


Sponsors


Contact Us

After four years of successful multi-day storytelling festivals, Charleston Tells continues to extend the power of performance through a quarterly concert series. Mark your calendar for August 25, when Charleston Tells Concert Series presents an Evening with Kate Campbell.

The people and culture of the modern South serve as the inspiration for the songs of Nashville-based singer/songwriter Kate Campbell. The daughter of a Baptist preacher, Kate uses her songs to chronicle the societal changes below the Mason-Dixon Line. Her endearing, clear-water vocal delivery and her eloquent gift for storytelling have drawn repeated comparisons to such bastions of the Southern literary tradition as Flannery O'Connor, Eudora Welty, and William Faulkner.
 

"What a great talent Kate Campbell represents is made clear by the legends in music that appear as guest artists on her albums. Emmylou Harris, Rodney Crowell, Nanci Griffith, Guy Clark, Maura O'Connell, John Prine, Mac McAnally, Buddy Miller, Spooner Oldham, and the heart of the Muscle Shoals classic soul and R&B hit-making machine are both admirers and collaborators in her distinctly literate musical vision." - Roots Time  
John L. Dart Anniversary

Charleston County
Public Library
John L. Dart Library

85th Anniversary

 


Join us in 2012 for a yearlong celebration commemorating the 85th anniversary of
Charleston’s first free public library for African-Americans. Help us celebrate the
legacy and groundbreaking spirit of the Rev. John L. Dart family, pioneers in the
Charleston community who dedicated their lives to improving the educational
opportunities for blacks. Realizing that local black children were being crowded
out of the city’s segregated schools, Rev. Dart founded the Charleston Normal
and Industrial School in 1894. And, in 1927, Dart’s daughter, Susan Dart Butler,
used her fathers’ extensive collection of books to establish the first free public
library for area blacks in the school’s Dart Hall. 

Check out these upcoming events.
To learn more, visit the John L. Dart Branch Library, 1067 King Street or call 843-722-7550. 


Community Appreciation Day
Wednesday, December 12, 2012 starting at 11 a.m.
John L. Dart Branch Library
Visit the branch, and receive a treat in celebration of this anniversary year.    


Special thanks to:
85th Anniversary Planning Committee
Cynthia Bledsoe, CCPL
Cheryl Brinkley, CCPL
Dr. Nicholas Butler, CCPL
Dr. Robert Chase, Avery Research Center
Norma Hoffman Davis, Community Member
Harlan Greene, College of Charleston
Cynthia Graham Hurd, CCPL
Dr. Patricia Williams Lessane, Avery Research Center
Kim Williams Odom, CCPL
Sherman Pyatt, CCPL
Dr. Maxine Smith, Community Member - Chairperson
Jamie Thomas, CCPL


Anniversary Partners
Charleston Friends of the Library
Charleston County School District Office of Community Education
City of Charleston - Arthur W. Christopher Community Center
Coca Cola Community Connection 
College of Charleston - Avery Research Center
College of Charleston Upward Bound Program
Emancipation Proclamation Association
Jonathan Green Studios, Inc.
Living Roots Magazine
Morris Street Baptist Church

The staff of CCPL’s S.C. History Room.

      

Cynthia Graham Hurd Memorial Fund

FOR RELEASE
On behalf of the family of Cynthia Graham Hurd
June 23, 2015

Media Contact: Jamie Thomas, 843-364-2030  

 

Family establishes Cynthia Graham Hurd Memorial Fund

Cynthia Graham Hurd, a career librarian and community leader died Wednesday, June 17, after a gunman killed nine people in a bible study at Mother Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, S.C. 

Hurd was a librarian with Charleston County Public Library for 31 years. In response to the tremendous outpouring of support from across the world and requests from individuals and businesses wanting to make donations in her memory, the family has established a fund at the library to continue her work. 

Funds donated to Charleston County Public Library will be set aside in her honor and used specifically for literacy, outreach and educational programming at the John L. Dart Branch Library and the St. Andrews Regional Library, both are branches that Hurd managed during her 31 years with CCPL. 

Donations can be sent to: 

           Charleston County Public Library
           c/o Cynthia Graham Hurd Memorial Fund
           68 Calhoun Street
           Charleston, S.C. 29401

Donations also can be submitted electronically through PayPal:

National library leader named CCPL director

Nicolle Davies, a nationally recognized library leader who was named Library Journal magazine's 2016 Librarian of the Year, will be Charleston County Public Library's new executive director, the library's Board of Trustees announced today. 

"Charleston is blessed to have a library leader of Nicolle's stature to steer our system in the transformational years ahead of us," said Andy Brack, chair of the library's Board of Trustees. "A world-class city attracts world-class talent. With energy, drive and vision, Nicolle will help guide our professional staff through exciting changes with new buildings and programs that will truly make our libraries become lifelong learning centers.

Davies will step down as director of the Arapahoe Library District, a system in the greater Denver area with eight branch libraries and a $30 million annual budget. She will start her new position in Charleston by October.

"I am thrilled to have been chosen as the next executive director of the Charleston County Public Library," Davies said today. "It is an exciting time for public libraries, and I am happy to join a community that invests in their libraries.

"During my interview, I was impressed with the warmth and passion that the staff and board have for this work," she added. "My hope is to serve even more patrons and members of the community as our libraries change and expand."

Library Journal, a national professional publication, praised Davies for improving library services to district residents. Specifically, the magazine recognized her efforts to make the library an essential community service and hub for residents by providing access to the latest, cutting-edge technologies and continually striving to ensure open communication with district residents and library staff.

Davies was one of three finalists selected by the board and interviewed earlier this month after a national search by an executive recruitment firm that specializes in locating the best and brightest from the world of libraries. More than 100 applications were received for the position.

The new director will lead the system's continuing efforts to grow virtual services, overhaul technologies, create innovative content and build sustainable partnerships with businesses and community organizations.

One key focus on the horizon for Davies will be the library's voter-approved $108.5 million Building and Renovation Program, which includes constructing five new libraries (two new branches and three replacements), renovating 13 existing branches and relocating support staff out of the Main Library to free up space for public use.

While in Colorado, she has supervised or worked on several multi-million projects to build new branches or renovate existing ones.

The starting salary for the position will be $151,250.

About Nicolle Davies

Davies, 40, started with the Arapahoe Library District in 2005 as director of communications and worked her up through several positions until being named executive director in 2012. Prior to that she worked in public relations and broadcast television.

While at the district, Davies implemented new staffing models, received voter support in 2015 for a tax levy that increased the library's budget by 25 percent and worked to oversee the construction or renovation of several branch libraries.

Currently, Davies is president of the Rotary Club of Centennial, Colo., and is active on several committees for the American Library Association, the Public Library Association and the Colorado Association for Libraries.

She has a master's degree in Library and Information Science from the University of Wisconsin and a master's degree in Public Administration from the University of Colorado.

###

Voter registration drives at CCPL


The Charleston County Board of Elections and Voter Registration provides one-stop voter registration. Drop by to register, and receive a government-issued and approved voter ID on-site. Current voters can update their address and information, sign up for absentee voting and more. To find out if you are eligible and what information you need to register, call
843-744-VOTE.

Click here to view the schedule of upcoming elections.

 Visit your local CCPL branch, and register to vote! 


August:
September:
One Book Charleston County Book Discussion Questions

Click here to find book discussion events at a branch near you.

1. The 9/11 tragedy was more than a decade ago, but people still have strong feelings about that day and the aftermath of the attacks. Do you remember where you were when you found out about the attacks? How have you learned to cope with this disaster? Do you think the nation has healed and is moving forward?

2. Did the book provide a sensitive portrayal of New York after the World Trade Center attacks? Is fiction a good vehicle to explore human tragedy?

3. Americans are a melting pot of various faiths and walks of life. In many ways, the incidents of 9/11 encouraged religious intolerance. Do you think we have learned to build bridges of acceptance and understanding?

4. Oskar’s father tells him the story of New York’s "sixth borough" which floated away to Antarctica with the residents frozen in time. The story shows how his father tries to engage Oskar, who may or may not have Asperger’s Syndrome, by encouraging his imagination and interest in mysteries. What do you think about Oskar’s relationship with his father? How does he process his grief when his father dies?

5. Many of the characters Oskar encounters are experiencing loss and longing. How does Oskar help them change over the course of the book?

6. Do you find the book’s illustrations, doodles and overwritten texts a meaningful, integral part of the work? What was your reaction to the graphic elements, especially the final series of flipbook graphics at the book’s conclusion?

7. Have you seen the movie adaptation of Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close starring Tom Hanks and Sandra Bullock? If so, did the movie convey the essence of the book?

 

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One Book Charleston County Related Books and Movies

Click here to visit the CCPL catalog. 

Looking for more books or films related to Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close? Check out some of these reading and viewing options available from Charleston County Public Library. Call numbers are provided for your convenience (all fiction is arranged alphabetically by author's last name).


Nonfiction
  • The Black Banners: The Inside Story of 9/11 and the War Against al-Qaedaa
    by Ali H. Soufan and Daniel Freedman
    973.931 Soufan
  • Portraits: 9/11/01: The Collected "Portraits of Grief" from The New York Times
    by The New York Times
    974.71 Portrait
  • The Book of Mychal : The Surprising Life and Heroic Death of Father Mychal Judge
    by Michael Daly
    BIO Judge
  • 102 Minutes: The Untold Story of the Fight to Survive Inside the Twin Towers
    by Jim Dwyer
    974.71 Dwyer
  • Watching the World Change: The Stories Behind the Images of 9/11
    by David Friend
    974.7 Friend
  • The 9/11 Report: A Graphic Adaptation
    by Sidney Jacobson
    973.931 Jacobson
  • The Looming Tower: Al Qaeda and the Road to 9/11
    by Lawrence Wright
    973.931 Wright
  • Firehouse
    by David Halberstam
    974.71 Halberstam

Fiction
  • Incendiary
    by Chris Cleave
  • The Lake Shore Limited
    by Sue Miller
  • Netherland
    by Joseph O’Neill
  • Saturday
    by Ian McEwan
  • Falling Man
    by Don DeLillo
     
Young Adults
  • Love is the Higher Law
    by David Levithan
  • Bullyville
    by Francine Prose
  • Marcelo in the Real World
    by Francisco X. Stork

Children
  • September 11, 2001: The Day That Changed America
    by Jill C. Wheeler
    973.931 Wheeler
  • Fireboat: The Heroic Adventures of the John J. Harvey
    by Maira Kalman
    974.71 Kalman
  • 14 Cows for America
    by Carmen Agra Deedy
    967.62 Deedy

Movies
  • Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close
    Fiction DVD & Blue-ray
  • 9/11 :The Filmmakers' Commemorative Edition
    973.931 Nine
  • Parallel Lines
    973.931 Parallel
Web Resource
 

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YallFest

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9 AT 4 P.M.  
MAIN LIBRARY TEEN LOUNGE

Meet some of your favorite YALLFest authors before the Charleston Young Adult Book Festival! They’ll read from their latest works, answer questions and sign books for teen fans. Space is limited.

Call 805-6903 to pre-register and guarantee a spot.

FEATURING ...
 
PSEUDONYMOUS BOSCH 
NYT bestselling author of The Name of This Book is Secret

KAMI GARCIA & MARGARET STOHL 
NYT bestselling authors of Beautiful Creatures

MELISSA DE LA CRUZ
NYT bestselling author of the Au Pairs and Blue Bloods series 

MICHELLE HODKIN 
author of The Unbecoming of Mara Dyer

GITTY DANESHVARI
author of The School of Fear

CARRIE RYAN
NYT bestselling author of The Forest of Hands and Teeth


YALLFEST
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 10 FROM 10 AM  - 6PM
BLUE BICYLE BOOKS, 420 KING STREET
843.722.2666   WWW.YALLFEST.ORG
Casting call for CCPL photo shoots
Contact:
Natalie Hauff, PR Manager
Phone: 843-805-6817
Email: hauffn@ccpl.org

Charleston County Public Library announces casting call!
Patrons invited to local branches to be photographed for new website

CHARLESTON, SC - Charleston County Public Library (CCPL) announces a casting call for patrons who love their local library! CCPL customers of all ages are invited to visit their nearest regional branch and be photographed using library services. Many of the photos taken will be featured on CCPL's new website, which will launch later this year, along with digital and print promotional materials. Light refreshments and snacks will be served during the casting call dates listed below.

Aug. 26:
10 - 11 a.m.
John's Island Branch - 3531 Maybank Highway, John's Island

12 - 1 p.m.
Hurd/St. Andrews Branch - 1735 N. Woodmere Dr., Charleston

CCPL distributes reusable bags

 

Contact:
June 1, 2017

Natalie Hauff, Public Relations Manager 
Phone: 843-805-6817
Email: hauffn@ccpl.org


CCPL announces effort to reduce plastic waste in local waterways
Library receives grant to distribute reusable bags through June and July

CHARLESTON, SC - Charleston County Public Library (CCPL) has committed to ending the distribution of single-use plastic bags at all 16 branch locations in an effort to fight marine debris that pollutes waterways and oceans. The National Marine Sanctuary Foundation recently awarded CCPL a grant to purchase reusable bags, and library customers may pick up a free bag at any CCPL location throughout June and July while supplies last.

The $6,400 grant is provided through a collaboration between the National Marine Sanctuary Foundation and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Marine Debris Program. These organizations strive to educate the public about the impact of plastic and other marine debris on the marine environment.

"This was a no-brainer for us, especially with the support of the Foundation and NOAA in purchasing the reusable bags," said CCPL Deputy Director Jim McQueen. "We are so excited about this collaboration and the potential impact CCPL may have in combating the growing pollution of plastics in our marine environment."

CCPL will host a kickoff event June 8 on World Oceans Day at the John's Island Regional branch, located at 3531 Maybank Highway on John's Island. Representatives from NOAA's Marine Debris Program will be on-site between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. to present information about marine pollution. Other CCPL branches will host programs in conjunction with the bag giveaway in June and July, and patrons are encouraged to contact their local library branch for program details and instructions to redeem one free bag per household. Supplies are limited; click here for CCPL branch contact information.

According to NOAA, plastic materials degrade into small pieces until they can't be seen. Full degradation into carbon dioxide, water and inorganic molecules is called mineralization. Plastic has the potential to harm fish and other wildlife, and most commonly used plastics do not mineralize (or go away) in the ocean; they instead break down into smaller and smaller pieces. Research shows that plastic consumed by fish and other marine life may cause irritation or damage to the digestive system. Plastic debris also accumulates pollutants such as PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls) up to 100,000 to 1,000,000 times the levels found in seawater.

For more information about the National Marine Sanctuary Foundation, visit www.MarineSanctuary.org. For details about NOAA's Marine Debris Program, visit www.marinedebris.noaa.gov.

One Book Charleston County Programs and Exhibits

Reporting the News or Creating the News? The Media’s Evolution in the Era of Instant News
Tuesday, September 11 at 6:30 p.m.
Main Library Auditorium
With the public’s demand for 24-hour news, reporters find themselves scurrying for information and details even as news stories are still unfolding. On 9/11, the world watched as airplanes flew into the World Trade Center and The Pentagon, as news broke about a downed plane in Pennsylvania and as rumors spread about additional hijackings. Under pressure to explain these breaking news events, the media often turned to unconfirmed reports, speculation and opinions from outside “experts.” Are these actions a reasonable trade-off for immediate news access? How far is too far, and how should the media strike a balance? Hear from seasoned journalists about the evolution of news reporting in this digital age, what they see in the future and how they strive to ensure accuracy and immediacy. Panelists include news anchor Raphael James of WCSC-Live 5 News, veteran reporter Bruce Smith with the Associated Press and Chris Lamb, an experienced journalist, author and communications professor at the College of Charleston.

Eyewitness to Disaster: Personal Stories of 9/11 Responders
Monday, September 24 at 6:30 p.m.
Main Library Auditorium

Although it has been 11 years since the tragic events of 9/11, the images and stories of loss and courage are part of the collective memories of all Americans. Most of us watched as events unfolded on our television screens, but the smoke, noise, flames and raw emotions are seared into the memories of the emergency responders called to the scene. Hear the personal stories of two first responders who found themselves on the scene in New York City and Washington, D.C. Rob Dewey, senior chaplain with Coastal Crisis Chaplaincy, spent two weeks at Ground Zero as part of a Disaster Mortuary Operational Response Team, providing around-the-clock support to emergency workers tasked with setting up a morgue and identifying the individuals who perished. Laurie Rose, currently a captain with North Charleston Fire Department, was a rookie firefighter with the Alexandria, Va. Fire Department when she responded to the scene at The Pentagon. Dewey and Rose will share their individual stories of being part of this national tragedy and its aftermath.

Religion in a Post-9/11 World
Thursday, October 11 at 6:30 p.m.
John L. Dart Branch

No matter what your faith, belief or culture, the events of 9/11 shook the nation as the country witnessed loss and human suffering that day. The characters in Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close are haunted with the personal grief of losing a loved one in the attacks, yet they find their loss provides a commonality and connection with people they’ve never known. Regardless of the differences, they now share a bond with total strangers. This panel discussion will explore the grieving process of people from different religions, look at how religious leaders responded to this national disaster and talk about whether the events brought people of different faiths closer together or created strained relationships. Join Rabbi Mosha Davis of Brith Sholom Beth Israel Synagogue, Father John Parker of the Church of the Holy Ascension, and Imam Majed Sabke of the Central Mosque of Charleston to discuss the role religion - and religious stereotypes - played in the days after the attacks and in the healing of the nation.

Touched by Autism
Wednesday, October 17 at 6:30 p.m.
St. Andrew’s Regional

Oskar Schell, the lead character of Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close, sees the world differently. Exhibiting the traits of autism, Oskar is highly intelligent, but has trouble expressing himself and making friends. Today, medical professionals consider autism at epidemic levels with the diagnosis nearly doubling in the past 20 years. A 2008 study showed 1 in 88 children are struggling with some form of this developmental disorder. With no known cure and no definitive cause, the Medical University of South Carolina created Project Rex, an outpatient treatment program to better understand and help children with the disorder. Learn more about Project Rex, find out about the signs and symptoms of autism plus available treatments during this presentation and discussion with experts from MUSC. Presenters include James Trulove - LISW-CP, Jennifer Warthen - LISW-CP, Nancy Warren - PhD and Dr. Frampton Gwynette, the director of Project Rex. For more information, visit
www.muscprojectrex.com.

Meet Author Jonathan Safran Foer
Tuesday, October 23 at 5 p.m.
College of Charleston’s TD Arena – 301 Meeting Street
Internationally acclaimed author Jonathan Safran Foer likes to challenge readers, making them question their beliefs and actions. He wrote his breakthrough debut novel, Everything is Illuminated, at just 25 years old. His next novel, Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close, was the first major work to explore the emotional upheaval and the raw, lingering grief caused by the events of 9/11. In his first major work of non-fiction, Eating Animals, Foer journeyed to farms to better understand the ethical, philosophical and logistical issues related to the production of the food for America’s dinner table, paying special attention to how animals are treated. Eating Animals was selected by The College of Charleston for its 2012-2013 College Reads! book, and Foer will visit the campus to talk about his books and his desire to engage readers.

 

Exhibit: First Responders Provide the “Keys” to Our Safety
September 11 - October 23
Main Library

After losing his father on 9/11, the nine-year-old main character in Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close discovers a key in his father’s closet and sets out on a mission to find the key’s owner and what it opens. During the tragic events of 9/11, just as in our everyday lives, emergency responders provided a lifeline for those in crisis. In an effort to honor these everyday heroes, Charleston County Public Library invites you to share your appreciation by writing a note of thanks. Stop by any branch library to pick up a paper “key,” and share your gratitude for the men and women who risk their lives to save others. A display will be created with the “keys of thanks” at the Main Library. After One Book Charleston County ends on October 23, the keys will be delivered to emergency service agencies throughout the county.

Scavenger Hunt for Teens
September 11 - October 23

Inspired by the puzzles and scavenger hunts that captivate Oskar, take part in a virtual scavenger hunt designed for teens and tweens. Visit the library’s web site to see photos of sites where the book Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close were randomly left throughout the Charleston area. Identify the locations in the photos and be entered to win a $50 Visa Gift Card. The hunt begins September 11, and entries will be accepted online through October 23. Meanwhile, stop by any branch library and check out a book to read. Winners will be drawn from the entries with the most correct answers. Limit one entry per person. Contest open to students in grades 6 - 12.

 

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Saul Alexander Gallery call for submissions

The Saul Alexander Gallery at Main Library will accept submissions September 1-30.
This is an opportunity for South Carolina artists and craftsmen to present their work to the public. A jury of local art professionals will meet to review all submissions, and those accepted will be scheduled to exhibit for one month during 2018 or early 2019.

Click here to learn more about the application process.

Friends now selling books online
Finding a great deal on a rare, out-of-print or unique book just got easier with the Charleston Friends of the Library’s online store, a source with thousands of offerings on just about every subject imaginable.

The new online store is available at
www.shopcharlestonlibraryfriends.org, and prices start at just one cent. The site also will sell DVDs and CDs. As always, proceeds from the Friends’ book sales benefit the Charleston County Public Library.

“More and more Friends groups are selling their books online in order to reach a larger audience for their specialized items,” said Emily Everett, director of the non-profit organization, adding that selection of new and used books will constantly be changing. The organization will continue hosting several large book sales each year.

It’s a great way to find inexpensive books, hard-to-find treasures, popular or obscure works, children's books and gently used bestsellers. Items are searchable by title, author’s name and keyword plus shoppers can browse by category, such as children's fiction, history, art, travel, etc. Items will be shipped to the buyer.

The Charleston Friends of the Library, a non-profit volunteer organization, raises money through book sales, memberships and donations to help fund Library services, equipment, training, materials and public programming. The Friends collect and sort donated books for resale to raise money. To learn more about becoming a Friend of the Library or look for future book sale dates, visit
www.charlestonlibraryfriends.org.

 

Archie Comics memorabilia


Archie Comics Memorabilia
Main Library Children's Department
Through January 7

Visit the Children's Department at Main Library, and check out a variety of Archie Comics memorabilia provided by Nancy Silberkliet, Archie Comics co-CEO. 


Book Synopsis • About the Author • Book Discussions • Discussion Questions
Film Screenings • Programs and Exhibits • Teen Scavenger Hunt • Related Books and Movies 

What is One Book?

Celebrate the importance of reading and join the community-wide discussion as this year’s One Book Charleston County selection tackles the raw emotional drama depicted in the international bestseller Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close by Jonathan Safran Foer.

Set in New York City, the novel follows the life of nine-year-old Oskar Schell as he learns about his father’s death in the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001. Although highly intelligent, Oskar displays symptoms of Autism and lacks the social and communication skills needed to help him cope with his overwhelming sense of loss. His misses the special bond and adventures shared with his father, and he doesn’t know how to talk to his mother, who is going through her own feelings of grief and despair.

A year after the Trade Center attacks, Oskar discovers a key in his father’s closet. It is in an envelope with the word “Black” on the outside. Determined to find the key’s origin, he creates an elaborate, methodical plan to knock on doors and meet every person named Black in New York City. Through Oskar’s travels, he meets others who were touched by the events of 9/11, each with their own story to tell.

One Book Charleston County explores the issues raised in Foer’s book through special programs, book discussions and events. Adapted into a movie starring Tom Hanks and Sandra Bullock, the film will be shown multiple times to encourage residents to discuss how the movie depicted the struggles and adventures of Oskar and his family.

Also, as a closing event, the book’s author Jonathan Safran Foer will speak October 23 as part of the College of Charleston’s College Reads! series. CofC students are reading Foer’s nonfiction book, Eating Animals.

More than 600 copies of Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close are available for check out at one of CCPL’s 16 branches. Through the library’s web site, a digital eBook version is available from OverDrive and an audio book version is downloadable from OneClickDigital (click here to go to our downloadable media page).

The novel, with its layers of depth, is perfect for book clubs and book discussion groups. Book Club Kits, each with 15 copies plus suggested questions, can be reserved through the library’s catalog. For those not in a book club, there are 10 book discussions scheduled at various library branches.

Join the discussion, attend an event, view the movie and share your opinion of this poignant, humorous and thought-provoking novel set at a time of both heartache and heroism.

 
"A ...novel that will renew readers' faith that the right book at the right time still has the power to change the world." -O, The Oprah Magazine
 

Read a synopsis of Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close Learn more about Jonathan Safran Foer
 

"Foer is definitely a new sort of literary warrior – virtuosic, visionary, ingenious, hilarious, heartbreaking." -Village Voice

 

One Book Charleston County Banner with images of doors
was provided by Susan Huckaby Parsons of
Reimagining Photography.

 

Thanks to the sponsors of One Book Charleston County

 

 

1,000 Books before Kindergarten program



Did you know that the more often young children hear books read to them, the more prepared they are to read on their own when they start kindergarten? This program encourages you to read at least 1,000 books to your child between birth and the time he or she starts kindergarten.

You are your child's first and best teacher. When you talk, sing, read, write and play together at home, you help your child build vocabulary, develop language skills, and prepare to read independently.


Follow these simple steps to participate: 

1. Register online here: https://charlestonlibsc.readsquared.com, or visit your local library branch to receive a paper reading log.

2. Read with your child.

3. Record the titles of books you read online or on your child's paper reading log. 

4. When you finish reading 100 books, visit your local library branch. If you use the online system to log book titles, a children's librarian will look up your child's name and award prizes based on your child's progress. If you use a paper log, bring that to the library so your child will receive the following rewards:

• A sticker to take home

• A sticker to add to the library's mural

• The next paper log to keep track of books you read

5. Remember to repeat steps 2 through 4, and visit the library each time you read 100 books.

6. When you finish reading 1,000 books, your child will receive:

• A certificate commemorating his or her participation in the program

• His or her name on the Readers Wall of Fame

• An awesome jumpstart on success in school

This program has no end date except the start of kindergarten, so take your time and enjoy reading with your child. If you read one story a day, you will finish the program in less than three years! Don't wait; encourage a life-long love of reading and learning today!
I Make a Difference Initiative

Visit any CCPL branch to participate in a variety of programs and activities centered around the work of Marian Wright Edelman, author and founder of The Children’s Defense Fund, who will visit Charleston on March 1 to present a free public lecture at the Sottile Theatre. In light of Edelman’s visit, CCPL will feature programs for children, teens and adults that include storytimes centered around I Can Make a Difference, book discussions of The Measure of Our Success: A Letter To My Children and Yours, parenting support sessions and a social media campaign to share how you make a difference. Programs are offered through a partnership with the College of Charleston’s Race and Social Justice Initiative, funded by Google.



I Make a Difference: Book Discussions

Tuesday, February 16
John's Island Regional at 2 p.m.

Thursday, February 18
Otranto Road Regional at 6:30 p.m.

Tuesday, February 23
Main from 6-7:30 p.m.

Join a discussion about Marian Wright Edelman's book, The Measure of Our Success: A Letter to My Children and Yours,  her best-selling book written as a letter to her three sons.


I Make a Difference: Selfie Station

Throughout February
James Island
Main

Visit the selfie station, share how you create positive change in the world and upload the photo to 
CCPL's Facebook page or email publicrelations@ccpl.org.


I Make a Difference: Special Programs 


Monday, February 1 - Friday, February 26

TeenSpot Black History "A Difference Made" Essay Contest
Hurd/St. Andrews

Throughout February
I Can Make a Difference Envelope Art Program
John L. Dart

Saturday, February 13
Parents' Morning In Presentation by FamilyCorps
John L. Dart from 9:30-10:30 a.m.

I Can Make a Difference Storytime
John's Island Regional at 11 a.m.

Thursday, February 18
Educational Success: What a Parent Can Do
Hurd/St. Andrews at 6 p.m.

Saturday, February 20
Parenting Can Yield Positive Results with Dr. Murray
John L. Dart from 9:30-10:30 a.m.

Parenting Leadership Workshop
Main from 11 a.m.-12 p.m.

Tuesday, February 23
FamilyCorps Workshop: Positive Praise
Mt. Pleasant Regional from 6:30-7:30 p.m.

Wednesday, February 24
PLAY: Afterschool Stories from I Can Make a Difference
John L. Dart from 9:30-10:30 a.m.

Thursday, February 25
I Can Make a Difference Storytime/Craft
James Island at 10:30 a.m.

I Can Make a Difference Storytime
Otranto Road Regional at 10:30 a.m.

     
 
About Johnathan Safran Foer
 

image of author jonathan safran foerAt age 25, Jonathan Safran Foer emerged as one of the most original writers of his generation and a literary favorite with his 2002 best-selling debut novel, Everything Is Illuminated.

Drawing rave reviews, the book was translated into 35 languages. The Times of London called it “a work of genius,” and The Los Angeles Times hailed it as the “debut of the decade” and named it the 2002 Book of the Year.

In 2005, Liev Schreiber wrote and directed a film adaptation of the book with Elijah Wood cast as Foer in the movie.  

When Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close was published in 2003, it became an instant bestseller, both nationally and internationally, and was honored with more literary awards from organizations around the globe.

Again, Hollywood called, and they turned his second novel into a movie starring Tom Hanks, Sandra Bullock and newcomer Thomas Horn. The movie drew critical acclaim and was nominated for the 2012 Academy Award for Best Picture. People Magazine called it the best movie of the year.

Personally, Foer was receiving as many accolades as his work. He was named one of Rolling Stone’s “People of the Year,” Esquire’s “Best and Brightest,” and The New Yorker’s “20 under 40” list of the best young writers in the U.S.

For his next major writing project, Foer set out to visit animal farms across the country – from small, family-run organic farms to factory farms that produce more waste than Los Angeles. He wanted to understand the issues surrounding what we eat and be able to answer not just “Can this be eaten?” but “Should this be eaten?”

He documented his road adventure and the ecological crisis he observed in a nonfiction book called Eating Animals, which again made national and international bestseller lists.

A resident of Brooklyn, New York, Foer is currently working on an edition of the Haggadah.  

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Apply for 2016 DIY Festival by Jan. 31
Saturday, February 27 from 1-4 p.m.
Main Library
68 Calhoun St., downtown Charleston
FREE

The third annual Charleston DIY Festival is a community-led event that opens up the library space to local artists, makers, tinkerers and organizations who wish to share their knowledge and skills with others through creativity and interaction. 

Do you have something to contribute to the DIY Festival? Consider participating in one of the following ways:

Booths:
Demonstrate an activity, a business or a craft at an instructional table in the library's auditorium. While there is no fee for a booth, if you intend to sell goods during the event, 20% of proceeds go to our Friends of the Library, and only cash sales are accepted.

Lectures: Host a short seminar in one of our meeting rooms on a topic related to DIY or Maker culture.

Live Music: Do you play music? We are seeking local musicians to play in the auditorium during the festival. 

Applications will be accepted from December 15, 2015 - January 31, 2016. 

Click here to apply online. For more information, email diyfest@ccpl.org.

This project was funded in part by the City of Charleston Office of Cultural Affairs and the City of North Charleston Cultural Arts Program through their joint administration of the Lowcountry Quarterly Arts Grant Program and the South Carolina Arts Commission which receives support from the National Endowment for the Arts and the John and Susan Bennett Memorial Arts Fund of the Coastal Community Foundation of SC.
Mural honoring library employee

A world renowned artist is painting a colorful, wall-sized mural of books on the side of the John L. Dart Branch Library to honor Cynthia Graham Hurd, a 31-year employee of Charleston County Public Library and one of nine victims shot last year at Emanuel AME Church. 

Artist and author R. ROBOTS will paint the bright geometric mural on the south side of the branch at 1067 King Street from 10 a.m.-6 p.m. from Tuesday, February 23 through Friday, February 26 (weather dependent). Residents in the area are encouraged to visit and watch him work, and kids can participate in a workshop with the artist from 3:30-5 p.m. on Thursday, February 25 to create their own mural-inspired artwork to be attached to book carts in the building. 

Hurd was branch manager at the Dart Branch for 21 years before serving as branch manager of the St. Andrews Regional Library. The mural is being partially funded by a donation from Winston & Strawn LLP to the Cynthia Graham Hurd Memorial Fund, which was established at Charleston County Public Library by the Graham-Hurd families to promote outreach and educational programming at the two libraries she managed during her career.

The project is a collaboration between CCPL and Enough Pie, a non-profit organization dedicated to engaging and inspiring residents in Charleston’s Upper Peninsula. The organization identified the talented muralist and street artist to be part of the project.

CCPL Acting Executive Director Cynthia Bledsoe praised Enough Pie plus the many other donors and organizations committed to seeing that Hurd’s legacy continues.

“Cynthia grew up and lived just blocks from the Dart Library, and she helped thousands of people during her years there. This bright, bold mural will be a daily reminder of Cynthia and all the lives she touched,” she said.

Enough Pie Executive Director Cathryn Zommer said the Dart Library is a great community resource, and the organization is pleased to be able to help honor Hurd’s memory.

“We believe this mural will bring more folks to the branch and honor Cynthia by illuminating the magic of books and storytelling on a main wall of the building.”


ABOUT THE ARTIST:

Nick Kuszyk, aka R. Robots, is known for his large public art projects throughout the world, including sites in Berlin, Prague, London, Tel Aviv and throughout the United States. His work also hangs in galleries and Penguin Books published his children’s book, R Robot Saves Lunch, in 2003. Kuszyk graduated from Virginia Commonwealth University in Painting and Sculpture and was awarded a Virginia Museum Fellowship. He currently lives in New York.

 

Upcycled Art Competition
Learn about new James Island design March 6

Charleston County Public Library will host a community meeting to share updated designs of the new James Island Branch Library. Local residents overwhelmingly approved a referendum in November 2014 to build five new Charleston County Public Library branches and renovate 13 others. Behind-the-scenes progress has been made on the library building projects since then, and residents are invited to this community meeting to learn about those updates. During this meeting, the public will have the opportunity to listen to a presentation by the architects and participate in a question and answer session with CCPL and County staff.

Meeting date/location:
Monday, March 6 at 7 p.m.
James Island Elementary School Cafeteria
1872 Grimball Road, James Island

Additional community meetings will be scheduled to share design plans for the new Cooper River, St. Paul's/Hollywood and West Ashley libraries as the respective design teams for each site reach the necessary stage in the planning process.

To learn more about the construction and renovation plan, view a map and see a breakdown of the estimated costs, click here.  

That Summer Book Sale: June 23-25

Shop the Charleston Friends of the Library's Summer Book Sale at Main Library, located at 68 Calhoun St. downtown, and browse a fresh selection of more than 20,000 books, DVDs and CDs. Admission to the sale is free, and FOL members are invited to preview the sale Thursday, June 23 from 5-7:30 p.m.

Public hours for That Summer Book Sale:

  • Friday, June 23 from 9 a.m.-5:30 p.m.
  • Saturday, June 24 from 9 a.m.-5:30 p.m.
  • Sunday, June 25 from 2-4 p.m. *Special discounts available for Sunday shoppers.*

All items are individually priced, and prices start at $0.50 for children's books, $1 for paperbacks and $3 for hardback books. For more information, check out the event page on Facebook, call 843-805-6882 or email info@charlestonlibraryfriends.org.

Makers in Residence: Blogging Class



DIY Blogging
Wednesday, August 19 from 5:30-7:30 p.m.
Main Library, Second Floor Classroom
Have you ever wanted to set up a blog and have your own corner of the Internet to personalize and share your thoughts? This workshop, taught by blogger Anna Hartman of InTheNext30Days.com, will provide a step-by-step introduction to setting up your own WordPress blog. From site title, focus, design elements, social media and success tips, you'll learn the basics of establishing and maintaining a successful blogging community. Registration begins July 29.

All materials are provided. Email summersm@ccpl.org or call 805-6930 to register. Space is limited.

 

Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close Synopsis
 

image of extremely loud and incredibly close coverEveryone remembers where they were on September 11, 2001. It’s one of those dates that provides a touchstone for the nation, a common bond that brings everyone together for one shared experience.

For many people, like the characters in Jonathan Safran Foer’s novel Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close, 9/11 marks more than just the day when terrorists took over four airplanes to launch a horrific and deadly strike at America.

For many people, it also marks the day when they lost a loved one, a co-worker, a friend or a neighbor.

Foer’s book delves into the world of the Schell family - a family torn apart by the sudden loss of Thomas Schell, who died when airplanes flew into the World Trade Center towers in New York City. At the heart of the story is Thomas’ son, Oskar, who displays the traits of Autism or Asberger’s Syndrome.

Highly intelligent, nine-year-old Oskar lacks the social skills that many people rely on when facing a personal crisis and when going through traumatic grief. He feels alone as he watches his mother, Linda, deal with her own grief.

Going through the motions of daily living, Oskar and his mother drift further apart. They find themselves just existing from one day to the next.

For Oskar, however, a mystery lands in his lap as he finds a key in his father’s closet. They key is inside an envelope with the word “Black” written on it.

Convinced that the key must have some significance and can provide him information about his father, Oskar sets out on a mission to find every person with the last name Black. He’s determined to find the person connected to the key, and he creates an elaborate, methodical process to knock on every door and meet every person in New York named Black.

It is Oskar’s journey, the people he meets, the relationships he builds and the stories he hears that are the foundation of Foer’s book. Oskar finds that each person has their own story of 9/11, and they all have the common bond of being a survivor.  It is his journey, the people he meets and the stories he hears that provide him with the ability to start the healing process.

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Let's Talk About It Series
Teen input needed for best YA fiction survey

Librarians across the country are gathering input from teen readers about their favorite fiction titles, and Charleston voices need to be heard! 

The Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA) presents an annual selection of recommended fiction titles published for readers age 12 to 18 in the past 16 months. Members of the Best Fiction for Young Adults Committee (BFYA) compile these recommendations in order to provide librarians and library workers with a resource to use for collection development and reader’s advisory purposes. 

Nominated books are currently on display in the Main Library Teen Lounge with a special label affixed to their book jackets
(pictured right).


*Please note that these books may be placed on hold and picked up at any CCPL branch.*

Readers are encouraged to submit their feedback about featured titles through a simple online form. To cast a vote, teens must give books a 1-5 star review. There also is an option to submit a detailed review. 
Voting will continue through December 2017, and the Best Fiction finalists and “Top Ten” lists will be released in early 2018.

Click here to learn more about the BFYA process to select and recommend titles for teen readers.

Gadget and Media Drive
DIY Event Planning Series offered in May
De Gullah Roots Festival: April 25
Teen photography contest winners named

 

Here I am!
teen photography contest

Here They Are!

This summer, Charleston County Public Library, with help from Charleston Center for Photography and Nikon Inc., sponsored a photo contest for young adults, challenging them to illustrate the contest theme: “Here I Am.”

Nearly 50 students in grades 6-12 submitted photos interpreting the theme in literal and abstract ways while sharing their unique perspectives on life, the community and the world around them.

 

The photos were judged by a panel of instructors from the Charleston Center for Photography. Three top winners and 16 honorable mentions were selected. The top three winners each received a Nikon Camera. The first place winner will receive one-on-one photography lessons from the Charleston Center for Photography, plus The Center is holding a day-long photography camp for all the winners.


All of the winning photographs and honorable mentions will be displayed in an exhibit at the Main Library from October 4 - 28.

 

 

First Place

"Layers of Connection" by Lauren Hawes

 

 

Second Place

"Australian Bathing Boxes at Sunset" by Claire Dickman

 

 

Third Place

"Here I am in Puerto Rico" by Ava Kusmider

 

 

 

Honorable Mentions


Madison Cantrell
Grace Christoph
Jed Christoph
Cosette Geesey
Shayla Elisabeth Huffman


Destini Kokkinis
Jake Kusmider
Butler Mappus
Jules Mappus
Eden McKoy
Dalton Mills


Burke Andrew Mounts
Noah Shue
Bronte Stallings
Mark Stover
Alexis Yates

 

 
 

Thanks to our sponsors!


                          

 

Thanks to our community supporters whose generous donations helped provide prizes for Teen Summer Photography Contest.

 

     

                  

Building Bots: Discover, Inquire and Create
Let's Talk Pollinators: May 26 at Main Library
CCPL Board of Trustees elect new officers

Contact:                                                                                                                              
Natalie Hauff, Public Relations Manager
Phone: 843-805-6817
Email: hauffn@ccpl.org 

CCPL Board of Trustees elect new officers for FY2018

CHARLESTON, SC – The Board of Trustees of the Charleston County Public Library (CCPL) met June 27 and unanimously elected officers for the next fiscal year. The following board members will hold their respective positions for one year. 
 
•        Andy Brack, Chairman
•        Steven Clem, Vice Chairman
•        Susan Strunk, Treasurer
•        Troy Strother, Secretary
 
Brack, who has served as Board Chairman for the past year, says he appreciates the unified support of the library's trustees and looks forward to the many changes on the horizon, including a greater focus on customer service and providing the best of what libraries can offer to our citizens in Charleston County.

"Not only does the library staff have a new energy through the partnership with our new director, but our board is enthused to be working closely with the director and staff to bring new libraries to everyone in Charleston County," Brack said.  "This year, we'll have groundbreakings for new libraries in Mount Pleasant, James Island and the Hollywood area and also look forward to making progress with our new branches in West Ashley and North Charleston.”

Board member Maya Hollinshead, who previously served as secretary, will complete her second four-year term in December, which will create a new vacancy in January. 

"Maya has been an outstanding board secretary over the last few years and we're grateful for her service,” said Brack. “We look forward to her counsel in the months ahead before she rolls off of the board of trustees."



Discus to undergo maintenance Sunday

Discus - South Carolina's Virtual Library research databases will be unavailable Sunday, March 8 from 7-9 p.m. due to scheduled maintenance. Your patience is appreciated.

W. Ashley branch now open

Charleston County Public Library's West Ashley branch in South Windermere has resumed regular operating hours. The branch had been closed due to damage sustained during Hurricane Matthew, and repairs have since been made. 

 

Get SherLOCKED in the Library
Star Wars Reads Day: October 15
Tax preparation and additional resources

Click here to learn how to get tax forms

Area residents can receive free help with their taxes at several Charleston County Public Library branches through a project coordinated with the VITA (Volunteer Income Tax Assistance) Program and the American Association of Retired Persons (AARP). 

The programs target low-to moderate-income residents with AARP and also offer special attention to helping residents over 60 years old. A current picture ID and Social Security card are required, along with the Social Security cards of any dependents. For additional tax assistance, you can contact these organizations directly: VITA at 843-769-8173 or 2-1-1, or AARP at 1-888-227-7669. 

Tax assistance is available at the following CCPL branches:  


COOPER RIVER MEMORIAL LIBRARY     
3503 Rivers Avenue: 843-744-2489
VITA Tax Assistance
Saturdays, February 4-March 25 from 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

Please bring a current picture ID, last year's tax return, your W-2 form and Social Security card along with the Social Security cards of any dependents.

HURD/ ST. ANDREWS REGIONAL LIBRARY
1735 N. Woodmere Drive: 843-766-2546
AARP Tax Assistance 
Fridays, March 3- April 14 from 10 a.m. - 2p.m. 
A current picture ID and Social Security card are required, along with the Social Security cards of any dependents. Assistance is provided first come, first served, with priority given to seniors.  

JOHN'S ISLAND REGIONAL LIBRARY
3531 Maybank Highway: 843-559-1945

AARP Tax Assistance
Saturdays, February 4-April 15 from 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

A current picture ID and Social Security card are required, along with the Social Security cards of any dependents. Assistance is provided first come, first served with the last person accepted at 1 p.m. Assistance in Spanish will be available.

MAIN LIBRARY
68 Calhoun Street: 843-805-6930 

AARP Tax Assistance
Mondays, February 6-April 17 from 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.
A current picture ID and Social Security card are required, along with the Social Security cards of any dependents. Assistance is provided first come, first served, with priority given to seniors. 

VITA Tax Assistance
Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays, January 31-April 15 from 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

Please bring a current picture ID, last year's tax return, your W-2 form and Social Security card along with the Social Security cards of any dependents. 

MT. PLEASANT REGIONAL LIBRARY
1133 Mathis Ferry Road: 843-849-6161
AARP Tax Assistance
Mondays, February 6 and 13, March 27 and April 3 and 10 from 1-5 p.m.
Fridays, February 3, 10, 17 and 24, March 31 and April 7  from 1-5 p.m.

A current picture ID and Social Security card are required, along with the Social Security cards of any dependents. Assistance is provided first come, first served, with priority given to seniors. The last person will be accepted at 4 p.m.
Note: While Mt. Pleasant Regional Library is closed for heating, ventilation and air conditioning replacement, AARP will assist people at Seacoast Church (750 Long Point Road) on the following dates:
Mondays, March 6, 13 and 20 from 1-5 p.m.
Fridays, March 3,10,17 and 24 from 1-5 p.m.

State and Federal Tax Information, Links and Resources

South Carolina Tax Information

South Carolina Department of Revenue

Tax forms from other states

Toll free number for SC forms
1-800-768-3676

Taxpayer Service Center in Charleston
2 South Park Circle, Suite 100
Charleston, SC 29407
Phone: 843-852-3600
Fax: 843-556-1780

Federal Tax Information

Internal Revenue Service home page
800-829-3676

Taxes: Federal and State from USA.gov

Charleston Office
4400 Leeds Avenue
North Charleston, SC  29405 
Hours: Monday-Friday, 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Phone: 843-566-0209


How to get S.C. tax forms

  • Download forms at www.sctax.org.
  • Email a request for forms to forms@dor.sc.gov.
  • Call 800-768-3676 to request a booklet by mail.
  • Print forms at the Reference Desk for 10¢ per page
    (Form SC 1040 = 3 pages, instructions for 1040 form = 11 pages, tax tables = 4 pages) 
Celebrate Black History Month

Tuesday, February 28 at 6 p.m. 
Opera in Charleston, Part 4: The Academy of Music
Main Library
After the Civil War, the Academy of Music on King Street was the principal venue for traveling opera companies visiting Charleston. Join CCPL's historian, Dr. Nic Butler, for a look at the Academy's history and a sampling of the operatic repertoire heard by local audiences at the turn of the 20th century.


Throughout February  
 
Teen Black History Month Trivia  
Main Library
Test your knowledge, and receive a sweet treat for correct answers.

Teen Black History Month Scavenger Hunt
Main Library
Test your knowledge of famous African-Americans during a fun scavenger hunt, and earn a treat. 

Black History Month Challenge (grades 6-12)
James Island Library
Correctly match the description of a famous African-American with their name or photo for a candy prize.

Black History Month
Mt. Pleasant Regional Library
Celebrate Black History Month with a children's craft.

 African-American Read-a-thon
Otranto Road Regional Library
Read a book written by an African-American author, and receive a sweet treat in the Children’s Department.

Learn more than 50 languages with Mango

Mango Languages, a tool that allows CCPL customers to learn more than 50 languages, is available through the library’s web site.

This online language learning service helps English speakers learn more than 50 languages and offers English as a Second Language lessons in 16 different languages.      
    
This service is available via In Library | Home Access 

There are two levels of instruction – Basic and Complete 2.0. Within the Basic level, users can learn simple, practical skills for common, polite conversation in only a few short hours. Complete 2.0 teaches more in-depth language and grammar skills. For people wanting a rough translation of a document from Spanish to English, for example, Mango also offers a text-based translation tool.

Users can use an e-mail to register with Mango, and the service will keep up with your progress. For newcomers, a Start Learning button provides a good overview. It’s easy to use, and works best with devices with a microphone. It’s compatible with both Apple and Android devices, and once logged in to the site’s dashboard page, users will find links to download mobile apps.

Patrons needing technical support, such as help installing a Flash player at home, should contact Mango customer service line at 877-626-4611 during weekdays between 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Eastern or send an email to support@mangolanguages.com. Tech support information is available on the site.
 

Art therapy offered Sunday afternoons

 

 

Charleston's heart is broken, and area residents are struggling with feelings of grief, fear, anger and helplessness as they try to understand the senseless murders at Emanuel AME Church.

Although grief doesn't have a one-size-fits-all solution, residents in communities with other traumatic events - Sandy Hook and Boston - tapped into their creative process to find help with their feelings and emotions.

A new initiative, launched by HEARTS MEND HEARTS with Charleston County Public Library, is offering similar support to local residents faced with feelings of stress, dread or grief prompted by the church shooting. 

Residents can work with experienced artists and mental health professionals during art-based sessions each Sunday from 2:30-4:30 p.m. at Charleston County's Main Library, 68 Calhoun Street. There is no age limit and no art experience is needed. Art materials are being provided for the free sessions.

The goal is to help individuals use art as a tool to tap into their creativity, express feelings and ultimately work toward healing - all while in a safe environment.

The creative art process has been used for hundreds of years to help people identify emotions, encourage communication and promote healing. Understanding this connection, a group of local art therapists, educators, mental health professionals and artists joined together to create HEARTS MEND HEARTS in hopes of helping the Charleston community.

The professionals will lead attendees through the steps to create mandalas, an internationally recognized process that encourages individuals to identify personal emotions and reconcile conflicts.

HEARTS MEND HEARTS includes numerous art and mental health professionals, all volunteering their time. The organization was started by a small group that included: Registered Art Therapist Dianne Tennyson Vincent, MAT, ATR; Psychiatrist Deborah Milling, MD; Psychoanalyst Sharon Martin, FNP, CNS, PhD; and Nationally Board Certified Art Educator Laura De LaMaza.

Read how art therapy helped
other communities through grief

Studies have shown that art can help people
by lowering blood pressure and reducing the stress and anxiety usually associated with feelings related to grief.

 

 

 

Small branches expand service hours
 

Small branches expand service hours

 

CCPL’s small branches added hours as of April 4.

With this change, the branches' hours are more consistent plus they are open one evening per week. This provides the branch with opportunities to expand their programming and better meet the needs of residents living in these areas.

The new hours and branches impacted are:

   
Edisto Branch Library
Monday: 10 a.m.-6 p.m.
Tuesday and Friday: 2-6 p.m.
Thursday: 2-8 p.m.
Saturday: 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

Folly Beach
Monday and Friday: 10 a.m.-6 p.m.
Wednesday: 12-8 p.m.
2nd Saturday/month: 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

Poe/Sullivan’s Island
Monday and Friday: 10 a.m.-6 p.m.
Tuesday and Saturday: 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
Thursday: 2 p.m.-8 p.m.

St. Paul’s/Hollywood
Monday, Tuesday, Friday: 10 a.m.-6 p.m.
Thursday: 12-8 p.m.
Saturday: 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

Village
Monday, Tuesday, Friday: 10 a.m.-6 p.m.
Thursday: 12-8 p.m.
Saturday: 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

McClellanville
Monday: 2-6 p.m.
Tuesday, Thursday and Friday: 9:30 a.m.-1 p.m. and 2-6 p.m.
Saturday: 9:30 a.m. - 2 p.m.

 
 
OverDrive offers Big Library Read

CCPL users can participate in OverDrive's Big Library Read, a global library book club, by reading the same downloadable eBook from now through September 30. 

OverDrive is now offering unlimited downloads of Fancy Nancy: Nancy Clancy, Super Sleuth by Jane O'Connor, encouraging readers around the world to read the same book at the same time. OverDrive is an online service that provides downloadable eBooks and audio books. By spotlighting and encouraging people to download a single title at the same time, the company hopes to demonstrate the positive exposure and sales influence library eBook catalogs can provide authors and publishers.

Fancy Nancy: Nancy Clancy, Super Sleuth is the first in a series of delightful middle-grade mysteries. Sassy Fancy Nancy is a detective, and when one of her classmate's most special possessions disappears from school, it's up to Nancy to save the day. With the help of her friend Bree, she follows the clues to an unexpected source

O'Connor is the New York Times bestselling author of the Fancy Nancy series of books for children, as well as popular fiction for adults. She lives in New York City with her family and their canine companion, Arrow.

CCPL user response to the inaugural OverDrive Big Read earlier this year was very successful. Four Corners of the Sky, by Michael Malone, circulated 150 times as an eBook during its period as a featured title. The demand was such that two copies of the title were purchased after the program ended, and it remains popular.

  

Visit OverDrive to check out Fancy Nancy: Nancy Clancy, Super Sleuth 
by Jane O'Connor.


Check out all of CCPL's downloadable materials, including eBooks, audio books, magazines, music plus interactive activities and games for children.
  

Give us your opinion about CCPL's future    

Charleston County Public Library is developing a five-year Strategic Plan, and we want your opinion. Please take a moment to complete the survey below.

You also can send an email to
 letusknow@ccpl.org.

 

Residents and county leaders have made a number of suggestions relating to the Charleston County Public Library. Let us know if you favor or oppose each of these when considering CCPL’s future.

Please check one under each suggestion (a. – e.):   

 

a. Providing more public funds to improve library facilities and services. Check one.

 

Strongly Favor       Moderately Favor      Neither Favor or Oppose
Moderately Oppose        Strongly Oppose

 

b. Locating libraries in highly visible, easily accessible areas. Check one.

 

Strongly Favor       Moderately Favor      Neither Favor or Oppose
Moderately Oppose        Strongly Oppose

 

c. Locating libraries convenient to other community services for ease of use. Check one.

 

Strongly Favor       Moderately Favor      Neither Favor or Oppose
Moderately Oppose        Strongly Oppose

d. Including cafes in library branches where you can sit and buy beverages or food items. Check one.

 

Strongly Favor       Moderately Favor      Neither Favor or Oppose
Moderately Oppose        Strongly Oppose

 

e. Building larger libraries in locations that are central to users instead of operating multiple smaller libraries. Check one.

 

Strongly Favor       Moderately Favor      Neither Favor or Oppose
Moderately Oppose        Strongly Oppose

 

f. Providing more publicity about where libraries are located. Select one.

 

Strongly Favor       Moderately Favor      Neither Favor or Oppose
Moderately Oppose        Strongly Oppose

Become a Digital Storyteller




Save the date for multicultural, family-oriented book festival 
 

Mark your calendars for November 6 when more than 100 authors, poets, storytellers and exhibitors come to Charleston for a full day of fun, free activities at the first local Capital BookFest, a multicultural, family-oriented book festival hosted at Charleston County Public Library and Blue Bicycle Books.

The festival’s goal is to “strengthen families through reading" by bringing the community together to meet national and local authors, attend readings, panel discussions and workshops plus enjoy fun activities for all ages in the KidsZone area. Events are scheduled between 10 a.m.-6 p.m. and are free. Free parking will be available for the public in the Aquarium garage.
 
Highlights include presentations from well-known authors, including Nikki Giovanni, Mary Alice Monroe, Nathalie Dupree, Marcus Amaker, Jack Bass, Bret Lott, Margot Theis Raven, Batt Humphreys, Victoria Rowell and more than 100 others.
  
The brainchild of poet and publisher Kwame Alexander, the festival originated in the Washington, DC area and




Event Schedule

Event Sponsors




  

is celebrating its sixth year by spreading its wings to Charleston and to Harrisburg, Pa.
 
“The Capital BookFest has been such a success in the Washington, DC area that our visitors and authors asked for additional opportunities to share this fun event with even more families,” said Alexander. “We’re all very excited to share the Capital BookFest with thousands of Lowcountry writers and booklovers – for free.”

Alexander felt Charleston would be a great location for the festival to grow and proposed the idea to Marjory Wentworth, South Carolina’s Poet Laureate, and Carol Ann Davis, Professor of English at the College of Charleston—both also founders of the Lowcountry Initiative for Literary Arts (LILA).

“Charleston is home to some of America’s most loved authors, and I just wondered why we didn’t have a book festival here. It just makes sense, culturally, as well as a vehicle to inspire young people,” says Wentworth.

Additionally, as part of the festival’s commitment to celebrate the literary arts and promote literacy, each year Capital BookFest publishes a new book, giving away copies to the first 1,000 festival attendees and offering the remaining copies for sale. This year’s book is Indigo Blume and the Garden City, a children’s picture book. The festival is also working with the College of Charleston’s Literacy Outreach Initiative to take several children’s and young adult authors into local elementary, middle and high schools to conduct readings and lead workshops on writing and publishing. High school student authors from this program will be featured on a panel at the Capital BookFest.

The Capital BookFest Charleston is presented by CreateSpace, the Lowcountry
Initiative for the Literary Arts and the College of Charleston. Major sponsors include the Charleston County Public Library, Charleston Friends of the Library, Pressque Editing, Earth Fare, Barnes & Noble, Blue Bicycle Books, Atlas Technologies and the Becket Agency.

For more information,
 call Charleston County Public Library at 843-805-6930.

 

Winter Reading program ends Feb. 14
Help the library when you shop on Amazon

Ever wish your holiday dollars could go a little further? If you’re a frequent Amazon shopper, you now can do some special holiday shopping and make a donation to the Friends of the Charleston County Library.

 

Through the AmazonSmile web page, you get the same Amazon deals and the AmazonSmile Foundation donates .5 percent of the purchase price to your favorite charity. The Friends of the Charleston County Library is a registered charitable organization with Amazon, so it’s a great way to help the library without spending anything extra.

 

To take advantage of this option, you need to access Amazon through the web address – http://smile.amazon.com. You’ll be prompted to login and select a charity. There are more than one million charities registered with the site. After making a selection, you’re transferred to a page with the familiar-looking Amazon layout, and your shopping experience is the same. To make sure your charity continues to receive donations, you must use the special AmazonSmile web page each time, so don’t forget to bookmark the page.

 

It’s a great way to make your money go further and to make a difference in your community. For more information, check out these details about AmazonSmile.

 

Library adds downloadable audio books
 

Newest addition to online services

Get started now!

 

Listening to a great book is easier than ever for local residents with Charleston County Public Library’s latest Web service - free downloadable audio books.

This new service, partly funded by the Friends of the Charleston County Library, gives patrons the ability to download books free from the library’s Web site just by using their library card number. Books are compatible with both PCs and Macs, and people can use iPods, iPhones and most MP3 devices to listen to the books.

The library contracted with Ingram Digital’s MyiLibrary Audio service and has added more than 550 downloadable titles, ranging from the latest best sellers by James Patterson or Anne Tyler to non-fiction biographies and children’s classics like the Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain.

With the system, patrons go to the library’s Web site –
www.ccpl.org – and look for the “Listen to Me” icon on the left side of the home page, then select the link for MyiLibrary audio. Patrons will need their library card number to login and peruse the collection. Once they find something of interest, the audio book should be added to their virtual “bookshelf.” Initially, the system will prompt them to download Ingram Media Manager to their computer before downloading their first audio file. Patrons can have up to two downloadable audio books at a time checked out and up to two hold requests. The audio books can be checked out for up to 14 days.

MyiLibrary is the latest in CCPL’s efforts to provide more services online for patrons. In addition to the downloadable audio books, the library has online book clubs, databases and talking storybooks for children.

The Tumblebooks Library includes animated talking storybooks for children plus puzzles and games to encourage learning and reading. In the library’s online Reader’s Corner, patrons can sign up for Online Book Clubs, which send short snippets of a different book via e-mail each week so they can decide if they want to check it out. NextReads allows patrons to sign up to receive e-newsletters based on their areas of interest. NextReads’s 19 e-newsletters profile recent releases and offer suggestions based on the subject, such as science fiction, business and personal finance, popular culture and historical fiction.

In addition to these reader services, CCPL offers more than 100 research databases, with most available remotely on the Internet. The databases cover topics including history, genealogy, finance and investing, legal forms, career and job assistance, literature and science.

To learn about all the online offerings, visit
www.ccpl.org or call Charleston County Public Library at 805-6930.

 

 
 
 
Mango Premiere: Enjoy learning a language

Lights, Camera, Language ...

    Library offers language-learning software based on movies

Learning a language is easier than ever with Mango Premiere, the one-of-a-kind, free software tool launching next week on Charleston County Public Library's web site.

Through movies, subtitles and color, Mango Premiere uses visual cues and entertainment to teach a foreign language. 
  
With the launch of Mango Premiere, users can access the first five movies that incorporate this new learning technology. The company plans to release 20 movies in seven languages by the end of the year. The movies teach language, grammar, vocabulary and culture. Multiple subtitles visually link similar words using color, and customers have access to a scene guide to make vocabulary notes as they watch the film. 

Mango Premiere is the newest offering from Mango Languages, a web-based, self-paced software product that teaches 60 foreign languages and has English as a Second Language lessons in 17 different languages. CCPL added Mango Languages to its free, online education and database tools last year. Mango Languages includes two learning levels and lets users register so the site can keep up with their progress. Compatible with both Apple and Android devices, Mango Languages also offers mobile apps.


Library users can access Mango Languages and Mango Premiere through the library's web site - www.ccpl.org. For more information, visit your local CCPL branch, go online at www.ccpl.org or learn more through www.MangoLanguages.com and www.MangoPremiere.com.

Met Opera in HD at Main Library
 

MET! Live in HD 
    Watch world class operas at Main Library


Click here for details about the featured opera performances.
 
   
   
   
CCPL named one of America's Star Libraries


Charleston County Public Library was named one of America's best public libraries by Library Journal, the oldest and most respected publication in the field. Through a rating system that measures the services of more than 7,300 libraries across the country, CCPL is one of only 260 libraries recognized in this year's America's Star Libraries report, and the only library in South Carolina to do so.

The study, compiled by the Library Journal Index of Public Library Service, clusters libraries with similar operating budgets together, then rates the libraries in five main categories: number of visitors, circulation, program attendance, public Internet use, and electronic circulation.

In order to qualify for consideration, libraries must be a public entity, have a service area with a population of at least 1,000 residents, and have a total operating expenditure of at least $10,000. CCPL received a three-star designation within the $10 million to $29.9 million expenditure category.
CCPL's star status is a direct reflection of the community's engagement both at physical library branches across the county and through use of the library's remote services, thanks to the added consideration of the circulation of digital materials in this year's study.

"This national recognition is further proof of the ongoing support we receive from the Charleston community, particularly as the voter-approved Building and Renovation program progresses," said Nicolle Davies, Executive Director. I'm thankful for our staff's commitment to customer service and the support exhibited by our Board of Trustees, and I look forward to continued growth and communication within the county."
  


Library construction update

Local residents overwhelmingly approved a referendum to build five new libraries and renovate 13 others in November 2014. Learn more about the library design and construction progress made since then:  
 

The first phase of the overall project involved soliciting community input for the five new library locations. One of CCPL’s top priorities during this process involved obtaining practical information from public library users. During fall 2015, community meetings were held in each region slated to receive a new library facility. Residents turned out in large numbers to share their opinions. CCPL staff, along with an architectural consulting team, compiled all the feedback received during this process. While similar comments were made at all locations, residents also shared wonderful stories about what makes each community unique. 
 

Quick Facts

Map of building plan

Building cost estimates

Building Referendum 

Through a competitive process during 2016, the County decided to pursue a Design-Build plan for the design and construction of the new libraries. This means that the County selects a general contractor who then selects the architects for each project. The resulting design teams ensure that the final product represents each specific community and that construction consistency is maintained across locations for ease and affordability of future maintenance. 

Click the links below to view updated branch designs presented during past community meetings, read on to learn more about library construction projects, and stay tuned to www.ccpl.org/construction for monthly status updates. 


Schematic Designs for new CCPL branches:   
Wando Mount Pleasant  I  Baxter Patrick James Island   I  St. Paul's Hollywood  I 
Bees Ferry West Ashley 


August 4, 2017

  • Charleston County Council officially selected names for the new library locations during their July 18 meeting. The names are as follows: Bees Ferry West Ashley, St. Paul's Hollywood, Baxter Patrick James Island, Wando Mount Pleasant, and R. Keith Summey North Charleston. 
      
  • A community meeting regarding the Bees Ferry West Ashley design took place July 24. Residents had the opportunity to ask questions about the construction schedule, building features and the library collection, and several community members in attendance provided positive feedback. The design team is now working on the design development stage, which is the second stage of the design process.
      
  • Charleston County, CCPL and MB Kahn are in the process of reviewing the culmination of the design development for St. Paul's Hollywood. This substantial assessment takes approximately one to two months to complete. Once the review is finalized and cost estimates are approved, the team will move into construction documentation, which is the final stage of design.
      
  • Charleston County and CCPL are nearing completion of design development review of the Baxter Patrick James Island library. Once cost estimates are approved, the Cummings and McCrady architecture team will start production of construction documents, which is the final stage of design.
      
  • A groundbreaking ceremony took place July 25 at the site of the Wando Mount Pleasant library. The event was attended by Charleston County staff, CCPL staff and Board of Trustees members, County Council members, design and construction representatives, as well as members of the nearby community. During the ceremony, CCPL's Executive Director Nicolle Davies remarked, "This is an exciting day because it's the first shovel in the ground for the series of our major building projects. We've worked hard behind the scenes to bring this to fruition, and we are eager to serve the citizens of this community with a new innovative and beautiful facility."

July 12, 2017
  • The West Ashley design team has wrapped up schematic design. A community meeting is scheduled Monday, July 24 from 7-8 p.m. at the Drayton Hall Elementary School cafeteria. The design team will present their progress to date, and attendees are encouraged to participate in a question and answer session with CCPL, County and contractor representatives.
      
  • The final building demolition at the Cooper River site is nearing completion. This work is scheduled to wrap-up by the end of July. 
      
  • Several community members attended a public meeting June 12, during which architects presented designs for the new St. Paul's branch. Following the presentation, attendees provided positive feedback and participated in a Q&A session with County, CCPL and contractor representatives to learn more about the construction schedule, building features and usage. The design team is now working on the design development stage, which is the second stage of the design process. 
      
  • The County, CCPL, and MB Kahn are reviewing the culmination of the design development for the new James Island branch. This substantial assessment takes one to two months to complete. Once the review is finalized and cost estimates approved, the team will move into construction documentation, which is the final stage of design. 
      
  • CCPL will hold a groundbreaking for the new branch in Mt. Pleasant on July 25. Stay tuned for details.

June 6, 2017
  • The West Ashley design team has wrapped up schematic design. A detailed review of the design and preliminary cost estimates are underway. Once everything is approved by CCPL and the County, the design team will be able to begin design development, which is the next stage of design. Design development is expected to start this month. 
        
  • One additional building at the Cooper River site (excluding the current library) is scheduled to be demolished before the end of June.
      
  • The St. Paul's/Hollywood design team has finished schematic design. A community meeting will take place June 12 at 7 p.m. at E.B. Ellington Elementary School. Architects will present updated branch designs, and attendees are encouraged to participate in a question and answer session with CCPL and County staff. View the architects' presentation for the new St. Paul's/Hollywood branch
       
  • The James Island design team is nearing completion of the design development phase. MB Kahn, the contractor, anticipates breaking ground on the new James Island branch in late summer or early fall 2017.
      
  • The County, CCPL, and MB Kahn are in the process of reviewing the culmination of the design development for Mt. Pleasant. This substantial assessment is expected to conclude in June. Once the review is finalized and cost estimates approved, the team will move into Construction Documentation, which is the final stage of design. MB Kahn anticipates breaking ground for the new Mt. Pleasant branch in late summer 2017. 

May 4, 2017
  • The West Ashley design team has wrapped up schematic design. A detailed review of the design and preliminary cost estimates are underway. Once everything is approved, the design team will be able to begin design development in late May. 
      
  • One additional building at the Cooper River site (excluding the current library) is scheduled to be demolished before the end of June.
      
  • The St. Paul's/Hollywood design team has finished schematic design. A community meeting is in the planning stages for late May or early June, and details will be shared once they are available. 
      
  • The James Island design team continues to make progress in the design development phase. Meetings are scheduled to review interior design plans this month. MB Kahn, the contractor, anticipates breaking ground at the James Island site in late summer or early fall 2017.
      
  • The County, CCPL, and MB Kahn are in the process of reviewing the culmination of the design development for Mt. Pleasant. This is a substantial assessment that should conclude this month. Once the review is finalized and cost estimates are approved, the team will move into construction documentation, which is the final stage of design. MB Kahn anticipates breaking ground at the Mt. Pleasant site in late summer 2017. 

April 4, 2017
  • A kick-off meeting was held March 9 to officially start the design work on the new West Ashley location. The design team made great progress throughout the month and met regularly with County and CCPL staff. Additional meetings to finalize the schematic design are scheduled later this month. 
     
  • The demolition of four existing buildings on the Cooper River site (excluding the current library) is complete. Some elements, such as concrete slabs, have been left in place and will be used for contractor staging areas once construction begins. 
     
  • The St. Paul's/Hollywood design team is wrapping up a cost estimate review. CCPL anticipates that this team will hold a community meeting in either May or June to present their design work to future customers. Stay tuned for meeting details. 
     
  • The James Island design team has moved into the design development stage. County and CCPL staff were pleased with the design progress that was presented during a recent meeting with design team members. MB Kahn anticipates breaking ground on the new James Island branch in fall 2017.
     
  • Representatives from Charleston County, CCPL and MB Kahn are in the process of reviewing the culmination of the design development for the new Mt. Pleasant branch. This is a substantial assessment that will take about one to two months to complete. Once the review is finalized and cost estimates are approved, the team will move into construction documentation, which is the final stage of design. MB Kahn anticipates breaking ground on the new Mt. Pleasant location in late summer 2017. 

March 7, 2017

As spring approaches, design progess continues on new library branches. Learn more about the current status of each library:

  • The specific site boundaries for the new West Ashley branch have been finalized. Charleston County issued the contractor a Notice to Proceed in early February, which authorized design work to begin at this location. 

  • The demolition of four existing buildings on the Cooper River site (excluding the current library) is nearing completion. Asbestos abatement at these buildings concluded earlier this month. 

  • The St. Paul's/Hollywood design is currently under review by Charleston County and CCPL. Once review and approval of this stage of design is complete, CCPL will schedule a community meeting for the architects to present their designs to the public.

  • Community members attended a public meeting March 6, during which architects presented designs for the new James Island branch. Following the presentation, attendees participated in a question and answer session with County, CCPL, and design and construction team representatives. 
    View the architects' design presentation for the new James Island branch.

  • The Mt. Pleasant design team continues to work through the design development stage. Charleston County and CCPL are in the process of reviewing the culmination of this work, which is a substantial assessment that will take approximately one to two months to complete. 
CCPL anticipates breaking ground on the new Mt. Pleasant branch this summer. The other locations will follow with staggered start dates to evenly distribute the work flow amongst the design and construction teams. 
February 6, 2017

With the 2016 holiday season behind us, the design teams continue to move forward with their work on the new libraries. Learn more about the current status of each library:
  • The County is working closely with Charleston County School District to finalize the specific site location for the new West Ashley branch. The design team is in the process of finalizing initial site studies in preparation for conceptual building design.

  • The environmental permitting process and associated demolition of four existing buildings on the Cooper River site (excluding the current library) are underway. Asbestos abatement at these buildings will begin within the next couple months.

  • The St. Paul's/Hollywood design team presented a schematic design proposal to County and CCPL staff on January 11. Internal review of this proposal is almost complete, and CCPL plans to schedule a community meeting to discuss this location in April.

  • The James Island design team presented a schematic design proposal to County and CCPL staff on January 11. An internal review of this proposal is almost complete, and CCPL plans to schedule a community meeting to discuss this location in March.

  • Community members attended a presentation by the architects for the new Mt. Pleasant location on January 30. The presentation was followed by a question and answer session where attendees had the opportunity to ask questions of the County, CCPL, and design and construction teams. The design team has been released to begin the design development stage. 
    View the architects' design presentation for the new Mt. Pleasant branch.

CCPL anticipates breaking ground on the first library in summer of 2017. The other locations will follow with staggered start dates to evenly distribute the work flow amongst the design and construction teams. 


January 5, 2017

In the midst of a busy holiday season, the library design teams continued their planning and preparation work. Project signs were installed at some of the future library sites in December. These signs will be updated to include additional information, designs and community meeting dates as progress continues. Learn more about the current status of each new library: 

  • County and CCPL staff met with the Charleston County School District planning team during the beginning of December to coordinate the specific site location for the new West Ashley branch. The design team is in the process of finalizing initial site studies in preparation for conceptual building design. 

  • The environmental permitting process and associated demolition of four existing buildings on the Cooper River site (excluding the current library) are underway. This will allow for the construction of a completely new library on this site. 

  • The St. Paul's/Hollywood design team will be on-site mid-January to present a schematic design proposal to County and CCPL staff.

  • The James Island design team will be on-site mid-January to present a schematic design proposal to County and CCPL staff. 

  • Internal review of the schematic design proposal for the new Mt. Pleasant location is almost complete. The design team will be released to begin the design development stage this month. CCPL plans to schedule a community meeting to discuss this location in January or February.
CCPL anticipates breaking ground on the first library in late spring or early summer of 2017. The other locations will follow suit with staggered start dates to evenly distribute the work flow amongst the design and construction teams. 

December 5, 2016

  • The County is working closely with Charleston County School District on the new West Ashley location.
     
  • The Sherriff's complex on the Cooper River replacement site is set to be demolished this winter, and a future round of demolition will allow for the construction of a completely new facility.
     
  • While civil engineers develop a St. Paul's/Hollywood replacement site plan that supports efficient access to the location, the design team is at work to create floor plans that will enable the branch to serve as a new community hub.
     
  • The James Island replacement is in the midst of schematic design, and CCPL representatives met with the design team to review the proposed plan.
     
  • The new Mt. Pleasant location design team created multiple schematic proposals for review by CCPL, and they are now fine-tuning these possibilities to meet the specific needs of the local community.

CCPL anticipates breaking ground on the first library in late spring of 2017. The others will follow with staggered start dates to allow for a more evenly distributed work flow amongst the design and construction teams.

Sign installation begins this month at the future CCPL Support Services building and the Mt. Pleasant, James Island and St. Paul's branch sites. The new site location signs will be updated with relevant information as work progresses in order to encourage awareness within local communities about their new libraries. Additional signs will be posted at other branch locations as work continues. 

Get library notices by e-mail!
 

Click here to sign up for e-mail notification.

 

What is e-mail notification?

E-mail notification means that we'll send you notices about your library account via
e-mail instead of U.S. mail.

  • Due Dates: courtesy reminders sent three days before an item becomes overdue
     
  • Overdue Notices: sent when a current item becomes overdue
     
  • Holds/Reserve Notices: sent when a requested item is available for pickup
Why should I sign up for e-mail notification?
Because notices are sent via e-mail instead of U.S. mail, you'll receive them faster and save money on any accumulated overdue fines. Also, e-mail notification is better use of your tax dollars! Help us be "green" and reduce the number of postcards printed and save on postage costs so that we can use your tax dollars more efficiently.
 
How do I sign up?

Sign up for e-mail notification at the Circulation Desk of any CCPL branch, the bookmobile or online.

 

General Information:

  • E-mail addresses are not shared or disclosed to any person or business outside the Charleston County Public Library.
     
  • Please notify the library of any e-mail address changes.
     
  • You may have an e-mail address added to each family members' accounts in order to receive notification of all your family's library materials.
      
  • You may renew materials online after obtaining a PIN (personal identification number). You may receive your PIN at the Circulation desk or by calling your branch library. One renewal per item is possible if there are no reserves on the item.
      
  • We ask our patrons to help us by being responsible. Please remember that failure to receive an e-mail notice does not waive a patron’s responsibility for the timely return of materials or fines incurred.
 
 
 
 
State Library seeks historic flood artwork

The S.C. State Library seeks artwork and literature that depicts last year's historic floods for #SCStronger, a commemorative display to honor those who responded to the flood event and examine the impact it had on the state. 

The library will accept submissions of prose, poetry, photographs and digital art from the general public this month. Individuals may submit up to five works per person through 12 p.m. Friday, October 28. Submissions will be reviewed and selected for display by a committee of SCSL staff. 

Please click here to submit items and read submission guidelines. For more information, contact Sean Gruber at
(803) 734-0462 or sgruber@statelibrabry.sc.gov
 
"South Carolina flood response"
by U.S. Department of Agriculture
Creative Commons License 2.0


 

2016 Annual Report

Access Summer Reading records for school

While CCPL's Summer Reading programs ended July 31, participants can still log in to view and print a record of the books they read or listened to this summer.

Thanks to everyone who participated and challenged themselves to read this summer! CCPL's summer programs would not be possible without the Charleston Friends of the Library and our amazing community sponsors. 

Lynda.com data breach

We have been notified by Lynda.com, that Lynda.com users were impacted in a recently-reported data breach.  

In December 2016 an unauthorized third party breached a database that included some of your Lynda.com learning data, such as contact information and courses viewed. We are informing you of this issue out of an abundance of caution. Please know that we have no evidence that this data included your email address or password. And while we have no evidence that your specific account was accessed or that any data has been made publicly available, we wanted to notify you as a precautionary measure.

If you have any questions, we encourage you to contact Lynda.com through their Support Center here: https://www.lynda.com/support/contact 

Come PLAY at your library!
   

  

Come PLAY with us! Check out CCPL's new PLAY (Public Libraries and You) programs and activities scheduled during the evenings and weekends so the whole family can visit the library together. About 100 PLAY programs are being scheduled monthly to promote early literacy and create family fun.

Visit our Programs & Events page and search for Children's Programs to see what programs are coming up!

Guide to PLAYing with us:
PLAY:
Check out these evening or weekend events for the whole family, including movies, music, crafts, games and storytimes.

PLAY with Dad: Bring Dad, or whoever else would like to come, for these fun programs designed to give children special time with a parent or guardian.

PLAY Day: Enjoy a variety of activities inspired by S.C. State Library's South Carolina DayByDay Family Literacy Activity Calendar. Look for a special book and calendar display with handouts and fun activities that reinforce vital skills needed to read and write.

   
   
Tell us why you love your library!
 

 

 

Do you love the Charleston County Public Library? Just like you, thousands of people all over South Carolina use their public libraries to access the information they need to improve their lives, find jobs and to help their children learn and stretch their imaginations.

Take a moment to share how you have benefited from using the library. Your story can make a difference in funding for public libraries statewide and ensuring that every citizen has access to quality resources and information.
 
This initiative is brought to you by the South Carolina State Library and the Association of Public Library Administrators.

 
 
 
 

Request for Proposals

 
Charleston County Public Library seeks a qualified consulting firm to develop a five-year strategic plan. This includes assessing current infrastructure and delivery systems and developing a plan to provide infrastructure to improve information technology, material processing, and delivery of materials, including delivery between facilities and users.

Submission deadline: December 1, 2010
 

Click here for Strategic Plan RFP

 
 
 
Spend an evening with Jonathan Green
     

An Evening with Jonathan Green
to benefit the Charleston County Public Library

Thursday, June 2, 2011
at
7 p.m.

Spoleto Headquarters
14 George St.

Followed by a Spoleto performance by young bluegrass sensation
Sarah Jarosz
9 p.m. at The Cistern
66 George St.

 

Tickets $40
Ticket price includes admission to the event, beverages, hors d'oeuvres and Spoleto performance.

RSVP by May 26 to (843) 805-6882
 

  
To bid on the lithograph
 Farm Woman by Jonathan Green seen above, click here to learn more.  

100% of the lithograph proceeds benefit the Charleston County Public Library.
  
Sponsors:

 

Dart Library should reopen Fri. at 10 a.m.

The John L. Dart Branch Library,1067 King Street, is expected to reopen Friday, May 27, at 10 a.m. after an air conditioning outage forced the branch's closure Tuesday afternoon.

Work is continuing to repair the air conditioning system, and technicians believe everything will be completed for a 10 a.m. opening Friday. If there are any delays or changes to the schedule, that information will be posted on the library's website or available by calling 805-6930.

The Dart Library is one of 16 locations within the Charleston County Public Library system. While the branch is closed, patrons are encouraged to visit one of the other library locations. For a full list of branches with their addresses and hours, check the Locations tab on the library's homepage or call 805-6930. 

 

Give your input for Library's future May 9-12
 

Click here to complete a survey about CCPL's future!

   
Faced with unprecedented growth in the demand for services combined with budget cuts and continually evolving changes in technology, Charleston County Public Library is working on a project to determine how it can best serve area residents in the future.
  

The Library, with the help of a private consulting firm that specializes in library planning, is working on a five-year Strategic Plan that includes a detailed look at current operations and solicits input through community meetings, interviews and telephone surveys to get input from library users and non-users.

Six community meetings are scheduled for the week of May 9-12, and it is key that
both library users and non-users speak up because their input will shape the Library’s future, said Board of Trustees Chairman Janet Segal.

“CCPL is at a crossroads, and we are facing big decisions about the Library’s buildings, programming, services and future funding.
To make sure the Library fulfills the community’s wants and needs, we need to hear from you,” Segal said. “Let’s face it, budgets are tight. Smart planning is a must
if we’re going to make any improvements.”
 
In addition to the six community meetings, the Strategic Planning process includes a random telephone survey by Opinionology, also scheduled for the week of May 9, plus residents can visit the Library’s website to submit comments online or email suggestions to letusknow@ccpl.org.




Dates and times for CCPL community meetings

Monday, May 9
6:30 p.m. – Dorchester Road Regional
6:30 p.m. – Mt. Pleasant Regional

Tuesday, May 10
6:30 p.m. – Otranto Road Regional

Wednesday, May 11
6:30 p.m. – St. Andrews Regional

Thursday, May 12
6:30 p.m. – Main Library
6:30 p.m. – John's Island Regional
 

The Library’s Board of Trustees hired Providence Associates Library Planners, a firm that has worked with libraries since 1979, to help with the massive Strategic Planning process. After gathering both internal operational details and community feedback, Providence will provide an independent assessment of the Library by applying “best practices” and looking at trends in library service and technology to develop the five-year Strategic Plan.
  
The need for a Strategic Plan came after a series of informal community meetings held by CCPL’s Executive Director Douglas Henderson last fall, shortly after joining the Library in August. He met with area residents, asking them what they thought about the library and what they’d like to see improved. The input from those meetings, along with the desire to define and improve library services in the future, prompted the board’s decision to pursue a Strategic Plan that would identify specific changes needed and the best way to achieve those changes.
 
Segal said residents at those meetings expressed support for the library and talked about wanting more space, more branches and more services. It’s vital that those comments become part of this Strategic Plan.
  
By hiring an outside consultant, the Board is able to bring in nationally recognized leaders in public library service to provide a fresh, independent look at the Library and help develop a plan for the future.

 

 

 
Civil War re-enactors, music featured Saturday
  

Charleston County residents will step back in time this Saturday as they experience the bravery and sacrifice of one of the nation’s first all-black regiments as the 54th Massachusetts, Company I, Civil War Reenactment Regiment sets up camp on the lawn of the St. Andrew’s Regional Library with a campfire, period clothing, weapons and equipment.
  

Learning about the lives of the soldiers from the Massachusetts 54th, their struggles featured in the movie Glory, is just part of the day-long Magical History Tour planned to celebrate African-American history and culture, particularly life in the Lowcountry. Events are scheduled from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. at the St. Andrew’s Regional Branch, 1735 N. Woodmere Drive off Sam Rittenberg Boulevard in West Ashley, including musical concerts by The Plantation Singers at 11 a.m., Bob Smalls and the African Drum Circle at 4:30 p.m., and Hip Hop Hooks on Black History at 3 p.m.
  


Courtesy The Post and Courier

Joined together by their love of country and desire to see the end of slavery, 650 freed black men volunteered in 1863 to form the Massachusetts 54th and faced their most famous battle on July 18, 1863, as they were ordered to the front of an attack at Fort Wagner on Morris Island in Charleston Harbor. The soldiers stormed the walls of the fort by crossing a narrow sand beach. Despite additional attacks from nearby Union ships, Confederate soldiers held strong, defending the fort and killing many of the members of the Massachusetts 54th, including the regiments white commander, Col. Robert Gould Shaw. During the attack, William H. Carney, the regiment’s standard bearer, was shot many times, but dragged himself to safety. Carney was the first black recipient of the Congressional Medal of Honor.
  

When the regiment was formed, pay for black soldiers was set at a lower rate than white soldiers. Members of the Massachusetts 54th volunteered and refused to take pay until it was equal to the amount paid whites. After the battle at Fort Wagner, the commitment and sacrifice of the regiment became big news in the North, proving that black troops made excellent soldiers and increasing support for the end of slavery. Their actions and stand for equal pay ultimately played a role in the 1964 decision that all soldiers receive the same pay, regardless of skin color.
  

The day’s schedule includes:

  • 10 a.m.-5 p.m. – Magical History Tour with the encampment of the Massachusetts 54th, Company I Civil War Re-enactors on the lawn.
  • 11 a.m. – The Plantation Singers will feature a sing along about the Gullah culture.
  • 12:30 p.m. – Re-enactors will present skits about the lives of the men from the Massachusetts 54th, including campfires and the firing of muskets
  • 3 p.m. – Hip Hop Hooks on Black History will present an upbeat history lesson about famous African Americans.
  • 4:30 p.m. – Bob Smalls and the African American Drum Circle provide the sights and sounds of a rich African tradition.
  • All Day – Children are encouraged to write and draw pictures about their dreams and share them on the branch’s Wall of Dreams.

Learn more about the lives of these brave soldiers through the help of 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Company I, Inc. Civil War Reenactment Regiment, a non-profit group dedicated to educating the public that was founded in 1991 by Joseph McGill Jr.

This program is sponsored by The Humanities Council of South Carolina, a state program of the National Endowment for the Humanities, dedicated to inspiring, engaging and enriching South Carolinians with programs on literature, history, culture and heritage.

   
   
   
   
   
Artist E. B. Lewis to speak at Dart Library
  

Former class clown to share inspirational story that led to becoming award-winning artist

  

Award-winning artist E.B. Lewis, known for his rich watercolors and lush detailed illustrations in more than 50 children’s books, is the guest speaker Wednesday, February 9 at 6:15 p.m. as part of the Dart After Dark series at the Dart Branch Library, 1067 King Street.
  

A self-described class clown, the 54-year-old Lewis realized as a sixth grader that he needed to straighten up if he was going to make something of himself. With a talent for drawing, Lewis found inspiration from two uncles who were successful artists, and he began taking art more seriously. Ultimately, upon the completion of high school, he enrolled at Temple University's Tyler School of Art.

In the Dart After Dark presentation, Lewis will share his story of inspiration and sacrifice, explaining how a class clown can turn

himself into a serious artist and winner of both the Coretta Scott King Illustrator Award for Talkin' about Bessie: The Story of Aviator Elizabeth Coleman and the Caldecott Honor Award for Coming on Home Soon.
  

Initially, Lewis focused on paintings that sold in galleries around the country, and his work is part of distinguished collections, including the Pew Charitable Trust. It wasn’t until 1993 that Lewis turned his interests to children’s book illustrations, where he immediately found a niche that resulted in praise from publications like Publisher’s Weekly, School Library Journal and Booklist. School Library Journal praised his art, saying he captured “the warmth and simplicity of the tale through his beautiful watercolor paintings. They bring the story to life, complementing the emotion, expression, and character of the printed words."
  

 

Other books illustrated by Lewis include: Margot Theis Raven’s Circle Unbroken: The Story of a Basket and Its People, Nikki Grimes’ Danitra Brown, Class Clown; Angela Johnson’s Lily Brown's Paintings, Clifton L. Taulbert’s Little Cliff's First Day of School, Natasha Anastasia Tarpley’s I Love My Hair!, Natasha Anastasia Tarpley’s Bippity Bop Barbershop, Jacqueline Woodson’s The Other Side and Earl B. Lewis’s This Little Light of Mine.
  

Dart After Dark is a monthly series of programs being offered by Charleston County Public Library at the John L. Dart Library Branch, 1067 King Street. The programs are held after the branch’s normal 6 p.m. closing time in hopes of bringing the community together and offering them quality programming during the evenings.
  
In addition to speaking at the Dart Library Wednesday evening, Lewis will visit several schools in the St. Pauls/Hollywood area February 9-11 as part of the

GEAR UP (Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness) program sponsored by The Citadel and the Commission on Higher Education. The program’s goal is to go into schools and introduce students to role models who can provide them with encouragement to reach their dreams. Lewis’ visit is part of GEAR UP’s “Authors in the Schools” initiative.
  
For more on Lewis, check out
http://www.eblewis.com.

   
   
   
Libraries delay Tues. opening until 10:30 a.m.
 

Charleston County Public Library locations that have regular Tuesday morning hours will delay their opening until 10:30 a.m. on Tuesday, January 11 because of hazardous weather conditions and to ensure the safety of staff and patrons.

Harry Potter exhibit featured Nov. 17-Dec. 12
  

Illustration of an owl
Konrad Gesner,
Historiae Animalium, 1551

  
In 1997, British author J. K. Rowling introduced the world to Harry Potter and a literary phenomenon was born. Millions of readers have followed Harry to the Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry where he discovers his heritage, encounters new plants and animals, and perfects his magical abilities. Although a fantasy story, the magic in the Harry Potter books is partially based on Renaissance traditions that played an important role in the development of Western science, including alchemy, astrology and natural philosophy. Incorporating the work of several 15th- and 16th-century thinkers, the seven-part series explores important ethical topics during Harry's attempts to defeat the villainous Lord Voldemort, such as the desire for knowledge, the effects of prejudice, and the responsibility that comes with power.

 

Main Library Exhibit Dates: November 17-December 12
68 Calhoun Street, Charleston

MUSC Exhibit Dates: December 20-January 7
Colbert Education Center and Library
171 Ashley Avenue, Charleston

Celebrate the Magic of Harry Potter - Exhibition Opening
Thursday, November 18 from 4-6 p.m.
Main Library Lobby
Join the festivities as CCPL celebrates the opening of the national traveling exhibit Harry Potter's World: Renaissance Science, Magic and Medicine. Dress in costume, enjoy children’s activities, light refreshments and be one of the first to experience this new exhibit. The exhibition explores Harry Potter's world, 
its roots in Renaissance science and the ethical questions that affected not only the wizards of Harry Potter, but also some of the great Renaissance thinkers.


Illustration of a dragon
Konrad Gesner,
Historiae Animalium, 1551

 
Harry Potter Trivia Party
Thursday, November 18 at 4 p.m.
Saturday November 20 at 11 a.m.
Main Library Children’s Area

Hop on your Firebolt and join us in the Children's room to celebrate all things Harry Potter. Test your Potter knowledge, 
enjoy crafts and win prizes. Kids are encouraged to dress up like their favorite Harry Potter character.
  


Illustration of a basilisk
Konrad Gesner,
Historiae Animalium, 1551

See the Chemistry in Harry Potter’s Magic!
Monday, November 22 at 6:30 p.m.
Main Library Auditorium
Witness the mystical world of Harry Potter’s magic through experiments like “The Clock of Repeating Time,” “The Glowing
Slug Spew,” and “The Bubbling Brew of Acid.” Experiments to be presented by College of Charleston students in the Gamma 
Delta Chapter of Alpha Chi Sigma, a professional chemistry fraternity.
  

The Real Harry Potter: Magic and Witchcraft in Pre-modern Europe
Thursday, December 2 at 6:30 p.m.
Main Library Auditorium
Belief in magic and witchcraft were commonplace in Renaissance-era Europe, with people frequently relying on spells and charms as they faced the hazards of everyday life. Join Dr. Jason Coy of the College of Charleston history department as he explores these phenomena, revealing the historical bases of the magical practices featured in the Harry Potter novels.

Harry Potter, Alchemy and Modern Medicine
Wednesday, December 15 at 12 p.m.
MUSC Waring Historical Library, 175 Ashley Avenue
Dr. Wayne Weart will explore the links between the alchemists of the past and the apothecary of yesterday and today, including a look at some of the signs, symbols and tools that have evolved over several centuries. Reservations required. Call 792-2289.

   
   

Harry Potter’s World: Renaissance Science, Magic and Medicine,
a traveling exhibition for libraries, was organized by the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Md. The tour is coordinated by
the American Library Association.

   

 
     
     
   
See S.C. and Charleston County election results
James Island branch temporarily closed
 

The James Island Branch Library is temporarily closed for air conditioning repairs. The branch will reopen Monday, June 21.

Due dates will be extended for items due at this branch during this time.

For questions regarding the James Island Branch reopening, please call 805-6930.

 

 

 
 
 
Dorothea Benton Frank event to benefit Library
 

Dorothea Benton Frank
loves her library.
You should too.

New York Times-bestselling author Dorothea Benton Frank will share her June book release, "Lowcountry Summer", in a fundraiser for the Charleston County Public Library.

Start your own Lowcountry Summer by meeting the author at a beautiful waterfront location. Sip champagne while you listen to her read a chapter of her new novel. Signing to follow.

Wednesday, June 16 from 5:30 - 7:30 p.m.
Cooper River Room
Mt. Pleasant Memorial Waterfront Park
Tickets: $30
     

A special dinner for eight will be held prior to Frank's book tour on June 14th. Charleston Grill and chef Michelle Weaver will host a 'Girls Night Out' dinner at the chef's table to benefit the Charleston County Public Library.

Monday, June 14 at 7 p.m.
Charleston Grill, very limited seating
Tickets: $250

For more information or to purchase tickets, please visit www.CharlestonLibraryFriends.org or call (843) 805-6882.

Hosted by the Charleston Friends of the Library. Space is limited. Books may be purchased at the event on June 16th. Limited quantity - reserve your copy today.
   
PURCHASE TICKETS HERE

 

 

Thanks to our sponsors:

 
 
Library software down June 15 for upgrades
   

We are upgrading our computer software to better serve you.

Due to system upgrades,
library computer software will
be down June 15th.

While the system is down:

  • Please have your library card to check out materials.
  • Items cannot be renewed.
  • Items cannot be placed on hold.
  • Account information will not be available.
  • Public computers and Internet will still be available.
   
   
   
   
Library hours cut due to budget shortfall
 

February 1, 2010

Charleston County Public Library will cut its operating hours to compensate for budget shortfalls caused by the continuing economic downturn.

The Library’s Board of Trustees unanimously decided to close the five Regional Libraries on Sundays and close the Main Library one hour earlier at 8 p.m., beginning April 1st. The Regional Libraries – Mt. Pleasant Regional, St. Andrew’s Regional, Otranto Road Regional, Dorchester Road Regional and John’s Island Regional – are currently open from 2-5 p.m. on Sundays during the school year and are closed on Sundays during the summer. The Main Library on Calhoun Street will remain open on Sundays.

The Main Library currently stays open until 9 p.m. Mondays-Thursdays. By closing one hour earlier, at 8 p.m. on those days, it makes the closing time at Main coincide with the current 8 p.m. closing already in effect at the five Regionals and three large branch libraries. Main is open from 9 a.m.-6 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays and will remain open from 2-5 p.m. on Sundays.

The Library receives its funding from the county and state, both facing difficult financial times prompting the budget reductions. The Library’s budget from the county was cut nearly $410,000 this last budget year. State revenue dropped 41 percent over a two-year period from $697,430 to $409,160 this year, equaling a $288,270 loss. Those cuts are expected to continue again next budget year.

Faced with budget shortfalls, the Library implemented a hiring freeze in January 2009 and currently has a 16 percent vacancy rate, making it increasingly difficult to maintain public services at all locations. With the new schedule, staff hours can be reallocated to ensure patrons continue receiving quality service.

“This is a tough decision, especially at a time when we’re facing double-digit increases in service demand because the public needs libraries more now than ever. They come to us for help in researching jobs openings, to use computers to submit job applications, to get resume assistance and for training to improve their computer skills so they can get or keep a job,” said Board Chairman Jeanne Holladay.

“We’ve frozen all hiring and looked for every way to cut spending and save money without reducing public services, but libraries aren’t immune to this tough economic situation, and we finally found our backs against the wall. Once the economy starts turning around, we hope we can restore these hours,” she said.

With 16 locations and a bookmobile, including six locations operating seven days a week, Charleston County Public Libraries are open a combined 743.5 hours weekly. The closures will reduce operations a total of 19 hours each week. Currently, there are no plans to close any library branches.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Julia Peterkin film to be screened April 28
 

Cheating the Stillness: The World of Julia Peterkin
Film Screening and Discussion

 

Produced by award-winning documentary filmmaker Gayla Jamison, The World of Julia Peterkin: Cheating the Stillness chronicles the controversial life of South Carolina author Julia Peterkin, Pulitzer Prize winner for her sensitive portrayal of rural African Americans of the 1920s.

Join us at the 
Main Library on April 28 for a reception at 5:15 p.m. and film screening at 6 p.m. The film will be followed by a discussion with the producer and editor about the challenges of making this film. Sponsored by the Charleston County Public Library, Charleston Friends of the Library, College of Charleston, S.C. Historical Society, Charleston Library Society, Center for Women and a donor-advised fund of Coastal Community Foundation.

Click here to view a 30 second trailer for
Cheating the Stillness: The World of Julia Peterkin

 
Celebrate Earth Day at Flowerfest, April 17
 
 
Experience and learn about the beautiful flowers that surround us in Charleston during this day-long event that coincides with Earth Day on Saturday, April 17. Programs for both children and adults will be offered throughout the day at the Main Library, 68 Calhoun Street.
 

Children's events:

10 – 10:45 a.m.
Storytime Redoute: The Man Who Painted Flowers
College of Charleston drama student reads in period costume.

11 – 11:45 a.m.
Create a Butterfly Garden – Talk and Tips
Learn how to create a butterfly garden with Dwight Williams, Director of Cypress Gardens.

11:45 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Storytime William Bartram: The Flower Hunter
College of Charleston drama student reads in period costume.

12:30 p.m.
Film:
Mama Earth: Her Destiny, Our Hands
Greenplanet Films, 23 minutes
 

Adult events:

10 – 10:30 a.m.
Charleston's French Botanic Garden Archaeological Dig
Learn about the archaeological dig with Dr. DeeDee Joyce of the College of Charleston and independent surveyor Walter Dunlap.

10 – 10:30 a.m.
Caring for Roses
Learn tips on caring for roses from Dr. Jim Lancaster, member of the Lowcountry Rose Society and Consulting Rosarian for the American Rose Society.

11:30 a.m.
Flower Photography Tips
Get tips on taking beautiful photographs of flowers from Reference Librarian John Van Dalen.

12 p.m.
The Noisette Rose
Learn about this beautiful rose from Noisette descendat Dedra Gourdine Davis and antique rose expert Ruth Knopf.

1 – 2 p.m.
Poisonous Plants in the Lowcountry
Learn about the poisonous plants found in the Lowcountry with garden writer PJ Gartin.

2 – 3 p.m.
What's Happening at Magnolia Gardens?
Tom Johnson, Director of Gardens, talks about all the happenings at Magnolia Gardens.
 

Want to learn more? Try some of these titles:

 
Butterflies
Butterfly Watching by Diane Bair
The Butterfly Book: A Kid's Guide to Attracting, Raising and Keeping Butterflies by
K. R. Hamilton
The Dangerous World of Butterflies: The Startling Subculture of Criminals, Collectors and Conservationists by Peter Laufer
Attracting Butterflies & Hummingbirds to Your Backyard: Watch Your Garden Come Alive with Beauty on the Wing by Sally Roth
A World for Butterflies: Their Lives, Behavior and Future by Phillip Schappert

Roses
Secrets of the Miniature Rose by Elizabeth Abler
In Search of Lost Roses by Thomas Christopher
Noisette Roses: 19th Century Charleston's Gift to the World by Virginia Kean
Gardening with Old Roses by John Scarman
Roses in the Southern Garden by G. Michael Shoup

Flower Photography
Flower & Garden Photography by Derek Fell
The Art of Flower and Garden Photography by Clive Nichols
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Celebrate National Library Week, April 11-17
 

 

Celebrate National Library Week @ your library, April 11-17

 

It’s National Library Week, a time to celebrate the contributions of libraries, librarians and library workers in schools, campuses and communities nationwide.

In today’s tough economy, libraries offer free resources to help people find jobs and learn new skills. People of all ages and backgrounds find entertainment, develop skills and come to find their place in the community. People gather for book discussions, films and musical performances and for storytime with their children. Libraries help the community thrive.

Here are just a few things you can do this week at the Charleston County Public Library:

  • Celebrate the Week of the Young Child with children’s programming at many CCPL branches
  • Learn about job seeking online
  • Get some guidance and practice writing fiction or memoirs
  • Learn about Twitter and how it can help your small business or nonprofit organization
  • Join a lively book discussion
  • Celebrate Charleston’s amazing gardens at Flowerfest

For more information about these and the many other programs going on at your library, visit a branch of the Charleston County Public Library, call 805-6930 or click on Programs & Events.

 
 
 
 
 
 
Library hosts Small Business Fair on March 18
 
Small Business
Resource Fair

March 18, 2010
 

Small business, entrepreneurs or those thinking about starting a business are invited to a full day of free workshops, counseling and networking at the 5th Annual Small Business Resource Fair on Thursday, March 18 at the Charleston County Main Library, 68 Calhoun Street.

An Exhibit Hall will be open from 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. with representatives from more than a dozen business organizations and government agencies that offer services or providing help to small businesses, including assistance with securing financing, creating a business plan and working with governments.

Counselors from Charleston Coastal chapter of SCORE will provide free individual business counseling from 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.

Four free workshops will be offered during the day:

  • Doing Business with Charleston County, 10 – 10:45 a.m.
    Speaker: Barrett Tolbert, Small Business Enterprise Manager, Charleston County Procurement
     
  • Top HR Tips for Small Businesses, 11 – 11:45 a.m.
    Speaker: Pat Eardley, HR Advisor
     
  • Do-It-Yourself Online Marketing Research, 12:30 – 1:15 p.m.
    Speaker: Amanda Holling, Business Reference Librarian
     
  • Money Matters! Funding Your Small Business, 1:30 – 3 p.m.
    Speakers: Mary Dickerson, Director FastTracSC, Charleston LDC Cindi Rourk, Loan Office, Charleston Local Development Corporation

At 12 p.m. and 2:45 p.m., tours will be offered of the Library’s Reference Department and Business Center to explain what information and services the Library has available to help businesses.

For more information on the exhibitors or the workshops, call the Charleston County Public Library at 805-6930.

   
Haiti earthquake - how to help
SEWE programs at the library
  

Southeastern Wildlife Exposition
Programs at the Library
February 12-13, 2010
Main Library, Auditorium

 



Friday, February 12 at 1 p.m.
Lecture: “Legends of the Hunt” by John Seerey-Lester
World-renowned painter John Seerey-Lester will host an audio-visual presentation about his new book, entitled “Legends of the Hunt.”
  
Friday, February 12 at 2:30 p.m.
Lecture: Carl Brenders: How & Why
One of the world’s most successful nature painters, Carl Brenders will share a slide presentation demonstrating his realistic painting technique, and offer his latest book, “Pride of Place.”
  
Saturday, February 13 at 1 p.m.
Celebrity Story Reading for Kids
Celebrity readers, including Suzi Hanna (wife of Jack Hanna), will delight the audience with wildlife and animal stories.
  
Saturday, February 13 at 3 p.m.  
“Animal Sculpture in America” by Robin Salmon with Brookgreen Gardens  
American Animalier: A Brief History of Animal Sculpture in America: Presented by Robin Salmon, Vice President of Collections & Curator of Sculpture at Brookgreen      Gardens, this lecture will highlight landmark artworks and prominent sculptors of animals – domestic and wild – from the mid 19th-Century to the present.
   
For more information about these programs, call 843-805-6930. For a list of all of the 2010 SEWE programs, please visit www.sewe.com.
   
   
Library closes at 3 pm Feb. 12 due to weather; reopens 12 pm Feb. 13
Charleston County Public Library will close its 16 locations at 3 p.m. today, Friday, February 12, and not reopen until 12 noon, Saturday, February 13. This includes the cancellation of all programs and events scheduled in the libraries during those hours. The early closing will allow staff and patrons the opportunity to get home safely before the area is impacted by expected severe weather.
DHEC & CCPL offer free H1N1 flu shots
 

DHEC and CCPL partner to provide
H1N1 vaccines at area libraries

 

CCPL and the local office of the S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) are working together to offer free H1N1 flu shots to the public at the following libraries. Vaccinations provided by nurses from Region 7 of DHEC.

Main Library: Wednesday, January 20 from 5-8 p.m., Conference Room B
Otranto Road Regional: Saturday, January 23 from 1-4 p.m., Auditorium
Dorchester Road Regional: Monday, January 25 from 5-8 p.m., Auditorium
St. Andrews Regional: Wednesday, January 27 from 4-7 p.m., Auditorium
John’s Island Regional: Friday, January 29 from 3-6 p.m., Auditorium
Mt. Pleasant Regional: Saturday, January 30 from 2:30-5:30 p.m., Auditorium

Patrons with questions about the H1N1 flu and vaccine should contact DHEC directly at 953-0095. More information about the vaccine is available on DHEC’s Web site.

 


Charleston County
Public Library

 
Libraries close at 5 p.m. Dec. 2 due to weather
 

Because of the potentially unstable weather, high winds and threat of tornadoes this evening, Charleston County Public Library will close its 16 locations at 5 p.m.

 
Mt. Pleasant Library holds Skin Health Fair, Nov. 14
 

From skin cancer to acne, Skin Health Fair offers free information

 

With Charlestonians spending so much time outdoors in boats, at the beach or visiting the area’s many parks, residents are particularly at risk of suffering from various skin conditions, ranging from skin cancers to acne.

To help residents learn how to prevent, recognize and treat various skin conditions, Charleston County Public Library is offering a free Skin Health Fair from 1-4 p.m., Saturday, November 14th at the Mt. Pleasant Regional Library, 1133 Mathis Ferry Rd., Mt. Pleasant. The free health fair will include information stations plus talks by medical professionals with expertise in the field, including skin cancers, skin diseases such as Rosacea and Psoriasis, acne control for all ages and the importance of moisturizing. 

Charleston County Public Library was one of only 10 libraries in the nation to win a grant from the American Association for the Advancement of Science’s Skin Deep Project to help educate the public on how to take care of the body’s largest organ – their skin.

Dr. Diana Antonovich from MUSC’s Department of Dermatology will speak at 1:30 p.m. about prevention and care associated with skin cancers, and Dr.  Rocky Bacelieri with East Coast Dermatology will speak at 2:30 p.m. about other common skin conditions. Informational posters from students at Buist Academy will be displayed, and a gift basket of Neutrogena skin products will be given as a door prize.

For more information, contact the Mt. Pleasant Regional Library at 849-6161.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Celebrate National FOL Week, Oct. 18-24
 
In honor of National Friends of the Library Week, October 18 - 24, Charleston County Public Library thanks the hundreds of local volunteers with the Friends of the Charleston County Library for their continuing support of the library and commitment to improving education and literacy in the local community.

This volunteer, non-profit support organization has raised money to enhance programming and services offered by CCPL for more than 25 years. To supplement member dues, the Friends 
of the Library raises the maj
ority of its funds from book sales held throughout the year and during 


Friends member Marlene Williamon, Friends President Sharon Harvey and CCPL
Acting Director Cynthia Bledsoe.

the group’s multi-day book sale event held annually at the Gaillard Municipal Auditorium. The 27th Annual Book Sale was held October 9 - 11, 2009 and drew more than 7,000 people.

Money raised by the Friends touches the lives of thousands throughout Charleston County by funding programs and events, including:

  • the annual Summer Reading program  
  • costs and materials for programs, such as movies, performer expenses, etc. 
  • author book signings and lectures 
  • ongoing professional development training for staff 

Members also provide hundreds of hours of volunteer time to help with library services and programs.

Now is the perfect time for anyone interested in helping with any of these endeavors to join the Friends of the Library. Download the Membership Form here or pick up a Membership Form at your local library branch.

For more information about the Friends of the Charleston County Library, please call (843) 805-6978 or visit www.charlestonlibraryfriends.org.

 
 
West Ashley Branch closed Sept. 14-20
 

Charleston County Public Library's West Ashley Branch in South Windermere will be closed next week so the branch's heating and air conditioning system can be replaced.

The branch will be closed Monday, September 14 and reopen at 10 a.m. Monday, September 21. To help accommodate patrons, an additional book drop will be added in front of the library and late fees for overdue items at this branch will be waived for the days closed. Patrons receiving notification of an item on hold during this time will have until September 26 for pick up.

We apologize for any inconvenience and encourage West Ashley residents to visit other nearby CCPL branches during the week:

  • St. Andrews Regional
    1735 North Woodmere, Charleston
    843-766-2546
     
  • James Island Branch
    1248 Camp Road, James Island
    843-795-6679
     
  • Main Library
    68 Calhoun Street, Charleston
    843-805-6930

For questions or more information, call 843-805-6930.

 

 

 

 

Fire Museum Library Passes now available
  

The North Charleston and American LaFrance Fire Museum and Educational Center has begun a “Museum Library Pass” program to be a cooperative partnership between public libraries and the fire museum.

The goal of the partnership is to offer complimentary museum access to anyone with a library card. Each Charleston County Library branch will receive at least two plastic credit card-style passes to the museum. The passes

can be checked out just like any other media, for a two-week period. The pass will grant admission to the fire museum for two adults and accompanying children.

The program is intended to foster a partnership between museums and libraries in the Lowcountry and follow the museum’s mission, which is to educate North Charleston and surrounding communities on the importance of fire and life safety through the history and evolution of the fire service. This is a joint effort offered through libraries serving residents in Charleton, Berkeley and Dorchester counties.

The Fire Museum is located at 4975 Center Pointe Drive in North Charleston. For more information on the Fire Museum, visit their website at www.legacyofheroes.org.
   
   
   
CCPL named one of the best nationwide
April 13, 2009  
   

Charleston County Public Library
named one of the best nationwide

Charleston County Public Library is one of the best library systems in the nation, according to a new rating system measuring library services of 7,115 systems across the country.

Library Journal, the oldest and most respected publication in the field, named CCPL a “star” library, putting it in the top 3 percent of library systems throughout the country. This first-ever service comparison clusters libraries with similar operating budgets then rates the libraries in four main categories: number of visitors, circulation, program attendance and public Internet computer use.

This high national praise prompted Charleston County Council on April 21st to adopt a resolution praising the Library and its staff members for their exceptional service and continuing commitment to improving the lives of local residents.

“We’re a community resource, not a vault with books that are kept under lock and key. From computer training and entertainment events to homework help and finding the most recent book or DVD, libraries provide residents with essential services and information,” said Cynthia Bledsoe, Acting Director. “Library Journal’s star rating is a reflection of how Charleston County residents have embraced the library and understand its importance as a vital cornerstone in the community. We’re proud of our rating and of the support from our community.”

Library