A decade of vector control activities: Progress and limitations of Chagas disease prevention in a region of Guatemala with persistent Triatoma dimidiata infestation.

Item request has been placed! ×
Item request cannot be made. ×
loading   Processing Request
  • Additional Information
    • Subject Terms:
    • NAICS/Industry Codes:
      115110 Support activities for crop production
      325320 Pesticide and Other Agricultural Chemical Manufacturing
      418390 Agricultural chemical and other farm supplies merchant wholesalers
    • Abstract:
      Introduction Chagas disease, a neglected tropical disease that affects millions of Latin Americans, has been effectively controlled in Guatemala after multiple rounds of indoor residual insecticide spraying (IRS). However, a few foci remain with persistent Triatoma dimidiata infestation. One such area is the municipality of Comapa, Department of Jutiapa, in the southeastern region of Guatemala, where control interventions appear less effective. We carried out three cross sectional entomological and serological surveys in Comapa to evaluate a decade of vector control activities. Baseline serological (1999) and entomological (2001-2) surveys were followed by three rounds of insecticide applications (2003-2005) and intermittent focal spraying of infested houses, until approximately 2012. Household inspections to determine entomological indices and construction materials were conducted in 2001, 2007 and 2011. Seroprevalence surveys were conducted in school-age children in 1999, 2007 and 2015, and in women of child bearing age (15-44 years) only in 2015. After multiple rounds of indoor residual sprayings (IRS), the infestation index decreased significantly from 39% (2001-2) to 27% (2011). Household construction materials alone predicted <10% of infested houses. Chagas seroprevalence in Comapa declined in school-aged children by 10-fold, from 10% (1999) to 1% (2015). However, seroprevalence in women of child bearing age remains >10%. Conclusion After a decade of vector control activities in Comapa, there is evidence of significantly reduced transmission. However, the continued risk for vector-borne and congenital transmission pose a threat to the 2022 Chagas disease elimination goal. Systematic integrated vector control and improved Chagas disease screening and treatment programs for congenital and vector-borne disease are needed to reach the elimination goal in regions with persistent vector infestation. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
    • Abstract:
      Copyright of PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases is the property of Public Library of Science and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)
    • Author Affiliations:
      1Center of Health Studies, Universidad del Valle de Guatemala, Ciudad de Guatemala, Guatemala
      2Center of Biotechnology, Universidad del Valle de Guatemala, Ciudad de Guatemala, Guatemala
      3Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Central America Regional Office, Guatemala City, Guatemala
      4Division of Global Health Protection, Center for Global Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America
      5Visiting Investigator, Universidad del Valle de Guatemala, Ciudad de Guatemala, Guatemala
      6Division of Vector-Borne Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Fort Collins, Colorado, United States of America
      7Area de Salud de Jutiapa, Ministerio de Salud Pública y Asistencia Social de Guatemala, Guatemala
    • ISSN:
      1935-2727
    • Accession Number:
      10.1371/journal.pntd.0006896
    • Accession Number:
      133110711
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      JUAREZ, J. G. et al. A decade of vector control activities: Progress and limitations of Chagas disease prevention in a region of Guatemala with persistent Triatoma dimidiata infestation. PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, [s. l.], v. 12, n. 11, p. 1–17, 2018. DOI 10.1371/journal.pntd.0006896. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=aph&AN=133110711. Acesso em: 5 jul. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Juarez JG, Pennington PM, Bryan JP, et al. A decade of vector control activities: Progress and limitations of Chagas disease prevention in a region of Guatemala with persistent Triatoma dimidiata infestation. PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases. 2018;12(11):1-17. doi:10.1371/journal.pntd.0006896.
    • AMA11:
      Juarez JG, Pennington PM, Bryan JP, et al. A decade of vector control activities: Progress and limitations of Chagas disease prevention in a region of Guatemala with persistent Triatoma dimidiata infestation. PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases. 2018;12(11):1-17. doi:10.1371/journal.pntd.0006896
    • APA:
      Juarez, J. G., Pennington, P. M., Bryan, J. P., Klein, R. E., Beard, C. B., Berganza, E., Rizzo, N., & Cordon-Rosales, C. (2018). A decade of vector control activities: Progress and limitations of Chagas disease prevention in a region of Guatemala with persistent Triatoma dimidiata infestation. PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, 12(11), 1–17. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0006896
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Juarez, Jose G., Pamela M. Pennington, Joe P. Bryan, Robert E. Klein, Charles B. Beard, Elsa Berganza, Nidia Rizzo, and Celia Cordon-Rosales. 2018. “A Decade of Vector Control Activities: Progress and Limitations of Chagas Disease Prevention in a Region of Guatemala with Persistent Triatoma Dimidiata Infestation.” PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases 12 (11): 1–17. doi:10.1371/journal.pntd.0006896.
    • Harvard:
      Juarez, J. G. et al. (2018) ‘A decade of vector control activities: Progress and limitations of Chagas disease prevention in a region of Guatemala with persistent Triatoma dimidiata infestation’, PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, 12(11), pp. 1–17. doi: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0006896.
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Juarez, JG, Pennington, PM, Bryan, JP, Klein, RE, Beard, CB, Berganza, E, Rizzo, N & Cordon-Rosales, C 2018, ‘A decade of vector control activities: Progress and limitations of Chagas disease prevention in a region of Guatemala with persistent Triatoma dimidiata infestation’, PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, vol. 12, no. 11, pp. 1–17, viewed 5 July 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Juarez, Jose G., et al. “A Decade of Vector Control Activities: Progress and Limitations of Chagas Disease Prevention in a Region of Guatemala with Persistent Triatoma Dimidiata Infestation.” PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, vol. 12, no. 11, Nov. 2018, pp. 1–17. EBSCOhost, doi:10.1371/journal.pntd.0006896.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Juarez, Jose G., Pamela M. Pennington, Joe P. Bryan, Robert E. Klein, Charles B. Beard, Elsa Berganza, Nidia Rizzo, and Celia Cordon-Rosales. “A Decade of Vector Control Activities: Progress and Limitations of Chagas Disease Prevention in a Region of Guatemala with Persistent Triatoma Dimidiata Infestation.” PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases 12, no. 11 (November 6, 2018): 1–17. doi:10.1371/journal.pntd.0006896.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Juarez JG, Pennington PM, Bryan JP, Klein RE, Beard CB, Berganza E, et al. A decade of vector control activities: Progress and limitations of Chagas disease prevention in a region of Guatemala with persistent Triatoma dimidiata infestation. PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases [Internet]. 2018 Nov 6 [cited 2020 Jul 5];12(11):1–17. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=aph&AN=133110711