Personal genome testing on physicians improves attitudes on pharmacogenomic approaches.

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  • Additional Information
    • Author-Supplied Keywords:
      Adverse reactions
      Bioengineering
      Biology and life sciences
      Biotechnology
      Clinical genetics
      Drug information
      Engineering and technology
      Genetic testing
      Genetics
      Genomic medicine
      Genomics
      Health care
      Health care providers
      Human genetics
      Medical doctors
      Medical personnel
      Medicine and health sciences
      People and places
      Pharmacogenomics
      Pharmacology
      Physicians
      Population groupings
      Professions
      Research and analysis methods
      Research Article
      Research design
      Survey research
      Surveys
    • NAICS/Industry Codes:
      621110 Offices of physicians
      621111 Offices of Physicians (except Mental Health Specialists)
    • Abstract:
      In this era of clinical genomics, the accumulation of knowledge of pharmacogenomics (PGx) is rising dramatically and attempts to utilize it in clinical practice are also increasing. However, this advanced knowledge and information have not yet been sufficiently utilized in the clinical field due to various barriers including physician factors. This study was conducted to evaluate the attitudes of physicians to PGx services by providing them their own genomic data analysis report focusing on PGx. We also tried to evaluate the clinical applicability of whole exome sequencing (WES)-based functional PGx test. In total 88 physicians participated in the study from September 2015 to August 2016. Physicians who agreed to participate in the study were asked to complete a pre-test survey evaluating their knowledge of and attitude toward clinical genomics including PGx. Only those who completed the pre-test survey proceeded to WES and were provided with a personal PGx analysis report in an offline group meeting. Physicians who received these PGx reports were asked to complete a follow-up survey within two weeks. We then analyzed changes in their knowledge and attitude after reviewing their own PGx analysis results through differences in their pre-test and post-test survey responses. In total, 70 physicians (79.5%) completed the pre-test and post-test surveys and attended an off-line seminar to review their personal PGx reports. After physicians reviewed the report, their perception of and attitude towards the PGx domain and genomics significantly changed. Physician’ awareness of the likelihood of occurrence of adverse drug reactions and genetic contribution was also changed significantly. Overall, physicians were very positive about the value and potential of the PGx test but maintained a conservative stance on its actual clinical use. Results revealed that physicians’ perception and attitude to the utility of PGx testing was significantly changed after reviewing their own WES results. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
    • Abstract:
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    • Author Affiliations:
      1Center for Precision Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, South Korea
      2Seoul National University Biomedical Informatics (SNUBI) and Systems Biomedical Informatics Research Center, Division of Biomedical Informatics, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea
    • ISSN:
      1932-6203
    • Accession Number:
      10.1371/journal.pone.0213860
    • Accession Number:
      135588435
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      LEE, K. H.; MIN, B. J.; KIM, J. H. Personal genome testing on physicians improves attitudes on pharmacogenomic approaches. PLoS ONE, [s. l.], v. 14, n. 3, p. 1–18, 2019. DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0213860. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=aph&AN=135588435. Acesso em: 28 maio. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Lee KH, Min BJ, Kim JH. Personal genome testing on physicians improves attitudes on pharmacogenomic approaches. PLoS ONE. 2019;14(3):1-18. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0213860.
    • APA:
      Lee, K. H., Min, B. J., & Kim, J. H. (2019). Personal genome testing on physicians improves attitudes on pharmacogenomic approaches. PLoS ONE, 14(3), 1–18. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0213860
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Lee, Kye Hwa, Byung Joo Min, and Ju Han Kim. 2019. “Personal Genome Testing on Physicians Improves Attitudes on Pharmacogenomic Approaches.” PLoS ONE 14 (3): 1–18. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0213860.
    • Harvard:
      Lee, K. H., Min, B. J. and Kim, J. H. (2019) ‘Personal genome testing on physicians improves attitudes on pharmacogenomic approaches’, PLoS ONE, 14(3), pp. 1–18. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0213860.
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Lee, KH, Min, BJ & Kim, JH 2019, ‘Personal genome testing on physicians improves attitudes on pharmacogenomic approaches’, PLoS ONE, vol. 14, no. 3, pp. 1–18, viewed 28 May 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Lee, Kye Hwa, et al. “Personal Genome Testing on Physicians Improves Attitudes on Pharmacogenomic Approaches.” PLoS ONE, vol. 14, no. 3, Mar. 2019, pp. 1–18. EBSCOhost, doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0213860.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Lee, Kye Hwa, Byung Joo Min, and Ju Han Kim. “Personal Genome Testing on Physicians Improves Attitudes on Pharmacogenomic Approaches.” PLoS ONE 14, no. 3 (March 28, 2019): 1–18. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0213860.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Lee KH, Min BJ, Kim JH. Personal genome testing on physicians improves attitudes on pharmacogenomic approaches. PLoS ONE [Internet]. 2019 Mar 28 [cited 2020 May 28];14(3):1–18. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=aph&AN=135588435