Presaccadic Attention Depends on Eye Movement Direction and Is Related to V1 Cortical Magnification.

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  • Additional Information
    • Source:
      Publisher: Society for Neuroscience Country of Publication: United States NLM ID: 8102140 Publication Model: Electronic Cited Medium: Internet ISSN: 1529-2401 (Electronic) Linking ISSN: 02706474 NLM ISO Abbreviation: J Neurosci Subsets: MEDLINE
    • Publication Information:
      Publication: Washington, DC : Society for Neuroscience
      Original Publication: [Baltimore, Md.] : The Society, c1981-
    • Subject Terms:
    • Abstract:
      With every saccadic eye movement, humans bring new information into their fovea to be processed with high visual acuity. Notably, perception is enhanced already before a relevant item is foveated: During saccade preparation, presaccadic attention shifts to the upcoming fixation location, which can be measured via behavioral correlates such as enhanced visual performance or modulations of sensory feature tuning. The coupling between saccadic eye movements and attention is assumed to be robust and mandatory and considered a mechanism facilitating the integration of pre- and postsaccadic information. However, until recently it had not been investigated as a function of saccade direction. Here, we measured contrast response functions during fixation and saccade preparation in male and female observers and found that the pronounced response gain benefit typically elicited by presaccadic attention is selectively lacking before upward saccades at the group level-some observers even showed a cost. Individual observer's sensitivity before upward saccades was negatively related to their amount of surface area in primary visual cortex representing the saccade target, suggesting a potential compensatory mechanism that optimizes the use of the limited neural resources processing the upper vertical meridian. Our results raise the question of how perceptual continuity is achieved and how upward saccades can be accurately targeted despite the lack of-theoretically required-presaccadic attention.
      Competing Interests: The authors declare no competing financial interests.
      (Copyright © 2024 the authors.)
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    • Grant Information:
      R01 EY019693 United States EY NEI NIH HHS; R01 EY027401 United States EY NEI NIH HHS
    • Contributed Indexing:
      Keywords: contrast sensitivity; cortical magnification; polar angle asymmetries; presaccadic attention; primary visual cortex; saccadic eye movements
    • Publication Date:
      Date Created: 20240205 Date Completed: 20240322 Latest Revision: 20240426
    • Publication Date:
      20240426
    • Accession Number:
      PMC10957215
    • Accession Number:
      10.1523/JNEUROSCI.1023-23.2023
    • Accession Number:
      38316562