Endothelial-derived extracellular matrix ameliorate the stemness deprivation during ex vivo expansion of mouse bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

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    • Abstract:
      Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) hold great potential in cell therapies by virtue of the regenerative effects and immunomodulatory properties, but the scarce nature of MSCs makes ex vivo expansion indispensable prior to transplantation purposes. However, potential loss of stemness ensuing culture expansion has hindered the advancements in MSCs-based treatments. In principle, stemness could be preserved by reconstructing the stem cell niche. To test whether the endothelial cells (ECs) participate in the constitution of the stem cell niche for mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), ECs derivatives including extracellular matrix (ECM) and conditioned medium (CM) prepared from aortic endothelial cells (AECs) and Mile Sven 1 endothelial cell line (MS1) were investigated for the potential to maintain MSCs stemness. MSCs expanded on endothelial ECMs, especially on MS1-ECM, possessed a more juvenile morphology and showed delayed proliferation, when compared with untreated MSCs and MSCs on MSC-ECM and in CMs. Once induced, MS1-ECM group showed better tri-lineage differentiations indicating that MS1-ECM could better preserve MSC stemness. MSCs on MS1-ECM showed stronger immune-modulatory potential and had significantly higher H3K27me3 with lower Kdm6b expression. Taken together, MS1-ECM shapes an inhibitory chromatin signature and retains MSCs stemness. Our work provided supportive evidence that MSCs can reside in a perivascular niche, and a feasible novel approach for MSCs expansion. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
    • Abstract:
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