Uncanny sex: cloning, photographic vision, and the reproduction of nature.

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  • Additional Information
    • Publication Year:
      2010
    • Author-Supplied Keywords:
      biotechnology
      cloning
      Freud
      photography
      sex
      the uncanny
    • NAICS/Industry Codes:
      NAICS/Industry Codes 541711 Research and Development in Biotechnology
    • Subject Terms:
    • Abstract:
      The prospect of cloning human beings is an issue that has taken center-stage in public concern over biotechnology in recent years. While a significant literature has emerged around many of the difficult questions that are raised here, this article argues that cloning also serves as a potent signifier of anxieties over the place of “sex” in the natural order of things. In analyzing this connection, it proposes that the idea of human cloning unsettles us in a way that may profitably be understood in terms of Sigmund Freud's account of the uncanny. To elucidate this claim, the article draws parallels between Roland Barthes' ontology of photography, Judith Butler's theory of gender melancholia, and the fiction of Kazuo Ishiguro. In all three cases, repetitions of sex and death at the limit of knowledge point to the uncanniness of cloning and compel a reassessment of the relation of (hetero)sexual reproduction to our understanding of nature and life. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
    • Abstract:
      Copyright of Social Semiotics is the property of Routledge and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)
    • ISSN:
      10350330
    • Accession Number:
      49233841
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      GARLICK, S. Uncanny sex: cloning, photographic vision, and the reproduction of nature. Social Semiotics, [s. l.], v. 20, n. 2, p. 139, 2010. Disponível em: . Acesso em: 23 set. 2019.
    • AMA:
      Garlick S. Uncanny sex: cloning, photographic vision, and the reproduction of nature. Social Semiotics. 2010;20(2):139. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edb&AN=49233841. Accessed September 23, 2019.
    • APA:
      Garlick, S. (2010). Uncanny sex: cloning, photographic vision, and the reproduction of nature. Social Semiotics, 20(2), 139. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edb&AN=49233841
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Garlick, Steve. 2010. “Uncanny Sex: Cloning, Photographic Vision, and the Reproduction of Nature.” Social Semiotics 20 (2): 139. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edb&AN=49233841.
    • Harvard:
      Garlick, S. (2010) ‘Uncanny sex: cloning, photographic vision, and the reproduction of nature’, Social Semiotics, 20(2), p. 139. Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edb&AN=49233841 (Accessed: 23 September 2019).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Garlick, S 2010, ‘Uncanny sex: cloning, photographic vision, and the reproduction of nature’, Social Semiotics, vol. 20, no. 2, p. 139, viewed 23 September 2019, .
    • MLA:
      Garlick, Steve. “Uncanny Sex: Cloning, Photographic Vision, and the Reproduction of Nature.” Social Semiotics, vol. 20, no. 2, Apr. 2010, p. 139. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edb&AN=49233841.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Garlick, Steve. “Uncanny Sex: Cloning, Photographic Vision, and the Reproduction of Nature.” Social Semiotics 20, no. 2 (April 2010): 139. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edb&AN=49233841.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Garlick S. Uncanny sex: cloning, photographic vision, and the reproduction of nature. Social Semiotics [Internet]. 2010 Apr [cited 2019 Sep 23];20(2):139. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edb&AN=49233841