Growth in Transition: What We Know, What We Don't, and What We Should.

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  • Additional Information
    • Publication Year:
      2002
    • Subject Terms:
    • Abstract:
      The article discusses economic growth in transition. The authors believe that a comparison with China highlights one of the main lessons of the first ten years of economic transition: reform strategies cannot neglect the different institutional structures. When the first signs appeared about ten years ago that the socialist experiment was finally over, surprise and optimism immediately followed. Surprise was caused by the rapid successive collapse of communist regimes which culminated in the dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991. Optimism was justifiable. The removal of the overwhelming apparatus of political control over economic activity could only mean prosperity in the medium term. The Central and Eastern European and former Soviet Union countries seemed well-prepared for rapid take-off: they were industrialized, they had reasonably educated and healthy labor forces, and their population growth was minimal. Technology was lagging, but with the free flow of information and Western assistance, that could be overcome. Moreover, optimism was reinforced by substantial technical progress in the defense sector which could spill over to the rest of the economy.
    • ISSN:
      00220515
    • Accession Number:
      7388663
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      CAMPOS, N. F.; CORICELLI, F. Growth in Transition: What We Know, What We Don’t, and What We Should. Journal of Economic Literature, [s. l.], v. 40, n. 3, p. 793, 2002. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edb&AN=7388663. Acesso em: 10 dez. 2019.
    • AMA:
      Campos NF, Coricelli F. Growth in Transition: What We Know, What We Don’t, and What We Should. Journal of Economic Literature. 2002;40(3):793. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edb&AN=7388663. Accessed December 10, 2019.
    • APA:
      Campos, N. F., & Coricelli, F. (2002). Growth in Transition: What We Know, What We Don’t, and What We Should. Journal of Economic Literature, 40(3), 793. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edb&AN=7388663
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Campos, Nauro F., and Fabrizio Coricelli. 2002. “Growth in Transition: What We Know, What We Don’t, and What We Should.” Journal of Economic Literature 40 (3): 793. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edb&AN=7388663.
    • Harvard:
      Campos, N. F. and Coricelli, F. (2002) ‘Growth in Transition: What We Know, What We Don’t, and What We Should’, Journal of Economic Literature, 40(3), p. 793. Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edb&AN=7388663 (Accessed: 10 December 2019).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Campos, NF & Coricelli, F 2002, ‘Growth in Transition: What We Know, What We Don’t, and What We Should’, Journal of Economic Literature, vol. 40, no. 3, p. 793, viewed 10 December 2019, .
    • MLA:
      Campos, Nauro F., and Fabrizio Coricelli. “Growth in Transition: What We Know, What We Don’t, and What We Should.” Journal of Economic Literature, vol. 40, no. 3, Sept. 2002, p. 793. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edb&AN=7388663.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Campos, Nauro F., and Fabrizio Coricelli. “Growth in Transition: What We Know, What We Don’t, and What We Should.” Journal of Economic Literature 40, no. 3 (September 2002): 793. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edb&AN=7388663.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Campos NF, Coricelli F. Growth in Transition: What We Know, What We Don’t, and What We Should. Journal of Economic Literature [Internet]. 2002 Sep [cited 2019 Dec 10];40(3):793. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edb&AN=7388663