Using mobile devices for learning in clinical settings: A mixed-methods study of medical student, physician and patient perspectives.

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  • Additional Information
    • Subject Terms:
    • Abstract:
      This study was conducted with medical students, physicians, patients and carers in a paediatric and an adult hospital to determine use of mobile devices for learning, and beliefs and attitudes about others' use. Awareness of ethical, patient privacy and data security concerns was explored. The research was conducted using a mixed-methods sequential explanatory design through survey and focus groups for students and physicians, and a separate survey for patients and carers. Each arm of the study was analysed individually, followed by integration of quantitative and qualitative data, which are the subject of this paper. Interpretation of the integrated student and physician quantitative data highlighted that both groups used mobile devices for information verification, organisation and communication, and these represented the best uses of mobile devices; the worst aspects of mobile devices involved Internet access difficulties. Interpretation of the integrated student and physician qualitative data highlighted that students and physicians made individual decisions about their use of mobile devices, despite some existing policies. Integration of all data from all arms of the study identified the benefits of using mobile devices and concerns about distraction. For many students and physicians, the benefits of using mobile devices for learning at the patient bedside outweigh the possible risks. As society grapples with norms governing appropriate use of mobile devices, many are devising their own rules to aid learning in clinical settings. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
    • Abstract:
      Copyright of British Journal of Educational Technology is the property of Wiley-Blackwell and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)
    • Full Text Word Count:
      1773
    • ISSN:
      00071013
    • Accession Number:
      10.1111/bjet.12352
    • Accession Number:
      120689226
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      SCOTT, K. M. et al. Using mobile devices for learning in clinical settings: A mixed-methods study of medical student, physician and patient perspectives. British Journal of Educational Technology, [s. l.], v. 48, n. 1, p. 176–190, 2017. DOI 10.1111/bjet.12352. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=eft&AN=120689226. Acesso em: 9 jul. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Scott KM, Nerminathan A, Alexander S, Phelps M, Harrison A. Using mobile devices for learning in clinical settings: A mixed-methods study of medical student, physician and patient perspectives. British Journal of Educational Technology. 2017;48(1):176-190. doi:10.1111/bjet.12352.
    • AMA11:
      Scott KM, Nerminathan A, Alexander S, Phelps M, Harrison A. Using mobile devices for learning in clinical settings: A mixed-methods study of medical student, physician and patient perspectives. British Journal of Educational Technology. 2017;48(1):176-190. doi:10.1111/bjet.12352
    • APA:
      Scott, K. M., Nerminathan, A., Alexander, S., Phelps, M., & Harrison, A. (2017). Using mobile devices for learning in clinical settings: A mixed-methods study of medical student, physician and patient perspectives. British Journal of Educational Technology, 48(1), 176–190. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.12352
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Scott, Karen M., Arany Nerminathan, Shirley Alexander, Megan Phelps, and Amanda Harrison. 2017. “Using Mobile Devices for Learning in Clinical Settings: A Mixed-Methods Study of Medical Student, Physician and Patient Perspectives.” British Journal of Educational Technology 48 (1): 176–90. doi:10.1111/bjet.12352.
    • Harvard:
      Scott, K. M. et al. (2017) ‘Using mobile devices for learning in clinical settings: A mixed-methods study of medical student, physician and patient perspectives’, British Journal of Educational Technology, 48(1), pp. 176–190. doi: 10.1111/bjet.12352.
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Scott, KM, Nerminathan, A, Alexander, S, Phelps, M & Harrison, A 2017, ‘Using mobile devices for learning in clinical settings: A mixed-methods study of medical student, physician and patient perspectives’, British Journal of Educational Technology, vol. 48, no. 1, pp. 176–190, viewed 9 July 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Scott, Karen M., et al. “Using Mobile Devices for Learning in Clinical Settings: A Mixed-Methods Study of Medical Student, Physician and Patient Perspectives.” British Journal of Educational Technology, vol. 48, no. 1, Jan. 2017, pp. 176–190. EBSCOhost, doi:10.1111/bjet.12352.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Scott, Karen M., Arany Nerminathan, Shirley Alexander, Megan Phelps, and Amanda Harrison. “Using Mobile Devices for Learning in Clinical Settings: A Mixed-Methods Study of Medical Student, Physician and Patient Perspectives.” British Journal of Educational Technology 48, no. 1 (January 2017): 176–90. doi:10.1111/bjet.12352.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Scott KM, Nerminathan A, Alexander S, Phelps M, Harrison A. Using mobile devices for learning in clinical settings: A mixed-methods study of medical student, physician and patient perspectives. British Journal of Educational Technology [Internet]. 2017 Jan [cited 2020 Jul 9];48(1):176–90. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=eft&AN=120689226