How Grandma Kate Lost Her Cherokee Blood and What This Says about Race, Blood, and Belonging in Indian Country.

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  • Author(s): LAMBERT, MICHAEL
  • Source:
    American Indian Quarterly. Spring2019, Vol. 43 Issue 2, p135-167. 33p.
  • Document Type:
    Article
  • Additional Information
    • Subject Terms:
    • Abstract:
      This article documents how the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians (EBCI) created the now ubiquitous minimum blood quantum requirement as a rule for tribal membership. In making this argument, received ideas about Indian blood are decentered by demonstrating how Indian blood is created through bureaucratic acts rather than biological processes. As a vehicle to these larger questions, I examine how the US government and the EBCI negotiated the boundary between Indians and non-Indians over the course of the nineteenth century. Central to these boundaries were rolls assembled by the US government in the context of Cherokee claims that were made before and after the Treaty of New Echota of 1835. Toward the end of the nineteenth and into the twentieth century, the EBCI politically operationalized these rolls as a foundation for defining their tribal membership requirements. In so doing, they created and became the first tribe to adopt a minimum blood quantum requirement as a criterion for tribal membership. A particular focus is given to the debates surrounding the efforts of Keziah Vann's descendants to secure their place on the Cherokee rolls and acknowledgment by the US government and the EBCI of their Cherokee identity. Because this family was situated on the boundary between Indians and non-Indians from the time of the Cherokee Reservation Roll of the Treaty of 1817 until the Guion Miller Roll of 1909, debates surrounding this family have much to reveal about the Indian and non-Indian divide and the uses of blood and bureaucracy to construct Indian identity. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
    • Abstract:
      Copyright of American Indian Quarterly is the property of University of Nebraska Press and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)
    • Lexile:
      1520
    • Full Text Word Count:
      13200
    • ISSN:
      0095-182X
    • Accession Number:
      10.5250/amerindiquar.43.2.0135
    • Accession Number:
      135787458
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      LAMBERT, M. How Grandma Kate Lost Her Cherokee Blood and What This Says about Race, Blood, and Belonging in Indian Country. American Indian Quarterly, [s. l.], v. 43, n. 2, p. 135, 2019. DOI 10.5250/amerindiquar.43.2.0135. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=f5h&AN=135787458. Acesso em: 11 dez. 2019.
    • AMA:
      LAMBERT M. How Grandma Kate Lost Her Cherokee Blood and What This Says about Race, Blood, and Belonging in Indian Country. American Indian Quarterly. 2019;43(2):135. doi:10.5250/amerindiquar.43.2.0135.
    • APA:
      LAMBERT, M. (2019). How Grandma Kate Lost Her Cherokee Blood and What This Says about Race, Blood, and Belonging in Indian Country. American Indian Quarterly, 43(2), 135. https://doi.org/10.5250/amerindiquar.43.2.0135
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      LAMBERT, MICHAEL. 2019. “How Grandma Kate Lost Her Cherokee Blood and What This Says about Race, Blood, and Belonging in Indian Country.” American Indian Quarterly 43 (2): 135. doi:10.5250/amerindiquar.43.2.0135.
    • Harvard:
      LAMBERT, M. (2019) ‘How Grandma Kate Lost Her Cherokee Blood and What This Says about Race, Blood, and Belonging in Indian Country’, American Indian Quarterly, 43(2), p. 135. doi: 10.5250/amerindiquar.43.2.0135.
    • Harvard: Australian:
      LAMBERT, M 2019, ‘How Grandma Kate Lost Her Cherokee Blood and What This Says about Race, Blood, and Belonging in Indian Country’, American Indian Quarterly, vol. 43, no. 2, p. 135, viewed 11 December 2019, .
    • MLA:
      LAMBERT, MICHAEL. “How Grandma Kate Lost Her Cherokee Blood and What This Says about Race, Blood, and Belonging in Indian Country.” American Indian Quarterly, vol. 43, no. 2, Spring 2019, p. 135. EBSCOhost, doi:10.5250/amerindiquar.43.2.0135.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      LAMBERT, MICHAEL. “How Grandma Kate Lost Her Cherokee Blood and What This Says about Race, Blood, and Belonging in Indian Country.” American Indian Quarterly 43, no. 2 (Spring 2019): 135. doi:10.5250/amerindiquar.43.2.0135.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      LAMBERT M. How Grandma Kate Lost Her Cherokee Blood and What This Says about Race, Blood, and Belonging in Indian Country. American Indian Quarterly [Internet]. 2019 Spring [cited 2019 Dec 11];43(2):135. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=f5h&AN=135787458