With the Best INTENTIONS.

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  • Author(s): Rosner, David; Markowitz, Gerald
  • Source:
    American Journal of Public Health. Nov2012, Vol. 102 Issue 11, pe19-e33. 15p. 1 Color Photograph.
  • Document Type:
    Article
  • Additional Information
    • Subject Terms:
    • Subject Terms:
    • Abstract:
      In 2001, Maryland's court of appeals was asked to decide whether researchers at Johns Hopkins University had engaged in unethical research on children. During the 1990s, Johns Hopkins's Kennedy Krieger Institute had studied 108 African American children, aged 6 months to 6 years, to find an inexpensive and "practical" means to ameliorate lead poisoning. We have outlined the arguments in the case and the conundrum faced by public health researchers as they confront new threats to our health from environmental and industrial insults. We examined the case in light of contemporary public health ideology, which prioritizes harm reduction over the historical goals of prevention. As new synthetic toxins-such as bisphenyl A, polychlorinated biphenyls, other chlorinated hydrocarbons, tobacco, vinyl, and asbestos-are discovered to be biologically disruptive and disease producing at low levels, lead provides a window into the troubling dilemmas public health will have to confront in the future. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
    • Abstract:
      Copyright of American Journal of Public Health is the property of American Public Health Association and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)
    • Lexile:
      1570
    • Full Text Word Count:
      11381
    • ISSN:
      0090-0036
    • Accession Number:
      10.2105/AJPH.2012.301004
    • Accession Number:
      82884653
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      ROSNER, D.; MARKOWITZ, G. With the Best INTENTIONS. American Journal of Public Health, [s. l.], v. 102, n. 11, p. e19–e33, 2012. DOI 10.2105/AJPH.2012.301004. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=f5h&AN=82884653. Acesso em: 30 nov. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Rosner D, Markowitz G. With the Best INTENTIONS. American Journal of Public Health. 2012;102(11):e19-e33. doi:10.2105/AJPH.2012.301004
    • APA:
      Rosner, D., & Markowitz, G. (2012). With the Best INTENTIONS. American Journal of Public Health, 102(11), e19–e33. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2012.301004
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Rosner, David, and Gerald Markowitz. 2012. “With the Best INTENTIONS.” American Journal of Public Health 102 (11): e19–33. doi:10.2105/AJPH.2012.301004.
    • Harvard:
      Rosner, D. and Markowitz, G. (2012) ‘With the Best INTENTIONS’, American Journal of Public Health, 102(11), pp. e19–e33. doi: 10.2105/AJPH.2012.301004.
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Rosner, D & Markowitz, G 2012, ‘With the Best INTENTIONS’, American Journal of Public Health, vol. 102, no. 11, pp. e19–e33, viewed 30 November 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Rosner, David, and Gerald Markowitz. “With the Best INTENTIONS.” American Journal of Public Health, vol. 102, no. 11, Nov. 2012, pp. e19–e33. EBSCOhost, doi:10.2105/AJPH.2012.301004.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Rosner, David, and Gerald Markowitz. “With the Best INTENTIONS.” American Journal of Public Health 102, no. 11 (November 2012): e19–33. doi:10.2105/AJPH.2012.301004.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Rosner D, Markowitz G. With the Best INTENTIONS. American Journal of Public Health [Internet]. 2012 Nov [cited 2020 Nov 30];102(11):e19–33. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=f5h&AN=82884653