How Longitude Lane Got Its Name

July 14, 2017

Longitude Lane is a short, narrow alley in urban Charleston that has captured the imagination of countless tourists and residents alike.  Measuring approximately 540 feet long and just over ten feet wide, Longitude Lane is parallel to and approx...

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Lord Adam Gordon’s description of Charleston, 1765

June 30, 2017

Today we’re going to travel back to the year 1765 and listen to the words of Lord Adam Gordon, who visited Charleston and the Lowcountry of South Carolina as part of an extended tour of the American colonies.

Adam Gordon was born around the yea...

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Carolina Day: A Primer for Newcomers

June 23, 2017

Today we’re going to travel back in Lowcountry history to explore the genesis and legacy of a public holiday called “Carolina Day.”  Carolina Day is celebrated on the 28th of June every year, and that’s been the case since 1777.  The day...

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Vendue Range: A Brief History

June 9, 2017

Today we’re going to travel back in Lowcountry history to explore the roots of a site in urban Charleston called Vendue Range.  Almost everybody who’s been to Charleston in the past twenty-odd years has probably visited Vendue Range, but the...

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A Brief History of Marion Square, Part 2

June 2, 2017

In our last episode, we talked about history of the Charleston park called Marion Square from the early 1700s through the American Civil War, so let’s resume the narrative with the Confederate evacuation of Charleston in February of 1865.

On th...

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A Brief History of Marion Square, Part 1

May 26, 2017

Today we’re going to explore the history of a specific piece of property in urban Charleston called Marion Square. I’m sure most of you know the piece of land I’m talking about, but in case you’re new to the Lowcountry, we’ll begin with...

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The Life and Times of Thomas Grimball (1744–1783)

May 19, 2017

Today we’re going to travel back in Lowcountry history to explore the life story of a man who lived in the Charleston area in the eighteenth century and today is remembered by very few people. I’m talking about a man named Thomas Grimball, wh...

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148 Years of Bicycling In Charleston

May 12, 2017

May is National Bike month, so all across the United States bicycle advocates are staging events to raise awareness about topics like bike safety, bicycle rights and responsibilities, as well as promoting recreation on two wheels. In this era of ...

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German Palatines in Colonial Charleston

April 27, 2017

This week we’re travel back in Lowcountry history to explore the topic of Germans immigrants in the early days of our community.

Now hold on a minute—I know there are some listeners out there saying “well, I’m not really interested in Ger...

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A Woman’s Progress in Early South Carolina, Part 3

April 20, 2017

In the past two episodes we’ve focused on the “normal” legal parameters that shaped the lives of women in early South Carolina, but the legal rights and “disabilities” of  enslaved women, free women of color, and Native American women i...

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