Policing Charleston during the Era of Slavery, 1670-1865

When: Tuesday, September 25th 2018, 6 p.m. - 7 p.m. *NOTE NEW DATE*

Where: College of Charleston, Addelstone Library, Room 360, 205 Calhoun Street, 29401

In a society once ruled by a white minority, the primary focus of law enforcement in early Charleston was to surveil and intimidate the enslaved black majority. Traditional policing practices, rooted in medieval English law and based on a shared community responsibility, were modified locally to address the New World circumstances created by the practice of race-based slavery. Join CCPL's historian, Dr. Nic Butler, for a survey of early policing practices in both urban and rural Charleston, and how the destructive legacy of such practices cast a shadow over law enforcement well into the twentieth century.

 

Under False Colors: The Politics of Gender Expression in Post-Civil War Charleston

When: Thursday, September 27th 2018, 6 p.m. - 7 p.m.

Where: Charleston County Public Library Auditorium, 68 Calhoun Street, 29401

In the spring of 1868, the City of Charleston ratified an ordinance making it illegal for anyone to appear in public "in a dress not becoming his or her sex." This brief proscription, adopted during a time of major cultural and political upheaval in South Carolina, raises a host of questions about the local and national triggers that motivated City Council to take action. Were some Charlestonians really appearing in public "under false colors" (to use the nautical phrase), or was this prohibition part of a nationwide post-war identity crisis? Join CCPL's historian, Dr. Nic Butler, for a survey of the historical evidence and attitudes towards cross-dressing and gender expression in late-nineteenth century Charleston.

 

Reanimating Apparently Dead Bodies in 1790s Charleston

When: Saturday, October 27th 2018, 4 p.m. - 5 p.m.

Where: Mt. Pleasant Regional Library, 11133 Mathis Ferry Road, Mt. Pleasant, SC 29464

In 1793 the City of Charleston passed a law requiring citizens to try to revive persons who were “apparently dead” or in a state of "suspended animation." What was the origin of this plan to reanimate human bodies? Was it successful or simply ghoulish? Join CCPL’s historian, Dr. Nic Butler,  to learn about the fascinating Frankenstein-like experiments that gripped Charleston in the 1790s, and how they contributed to modern medical science.

 

Reanimating Apparently Dead Bodies in 1790s Charleston

When: Tuesday, October 30th 2018, 6 p.m. - 7 p.m.

Where: Hurd St. Andrew's Regional Library, 1735 N. Woodmere Drive, Charleston, SC 29407

In 1793 the City of Charleston passed a law requiring citizens to try to revive persons who were “apparently dead” or in a state of "suspended animation." What was the origin of this plan to reanimate human bodies? Was it successful or simply ghoulish? Join CCPL’s historian, Dr. Nic Butler,  to learn about the fascinating Frankenstein-like experiments that gripped Charleston in the 1790s, and how they contributed to modern medical science.

 

Charleston's Attachment to British Monarchy

When: Thursday, November 15th 2018, 2 p.m. - 3 p.m.

Where: Charleston County Public Library Auditorium, 68 Calhoun Street, 29401

From the earliest days of the Carolina colony to the summer of 1776, the people of Charleston and throughout the Lowcountry regularly and proudly expressed their allegiance to the British monarchy in documents, oaths, proclamations, parades, feasts, entertainments, and even fireworks. Join CCPL's historian, Dr. Nic Butler, for a sampling of such patriotic expressions that help us understand the difficult decision to turn against King George III in a war for independence.