Murder and Manhunt in 1820: Albro’s Flight from Slavery, Part 3

Murder and Manhunt in 1820: Albro’s Flight from Slavery, Part 3

September 10, 2021

Following his violent capture in Christ Church Parish, the African fugitive Albro was committed to jail in Charleston with a former friend and an infamous pair of convicted White criminals. Days later he returned to the village of Mount Pleasant f...

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Murder and Manhunt in 1820: Albro’s Flight from Slavery, Part 2

Murder and Manhunt in 1820: Albro’s Flight from Slavery, Part 2

September 3, 2021

Following Albro’s fatal encounter with a young White man on Dewees Island, the African fled through the waters of Copahee Sound and across several mainland plantations to evade detection. Meanwhile, the victim’s father traveled to Charleston to al...

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Murder and Manhunt in 1820: Albro’s Flight from Slavery, Part 1

Murder and Manhunt in 1820: Albro’s Flight from Slavery, Part 1

August 27, 2021

When an enslaved African man named Albro asserted his freedom and fled from the Isle of Palms in 1819, the laws of South Carolina marked him as a criminal fugitive. Spied and then pursued by white men on Dewees Island one night in early 1820, Albr...

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Escaping Slavery: Resistance on the Run

Escaping Slavery: Resistance on the Run

August 20, 2021

Slavery was legal in South Carolina until 1865, during which time thousands of enslaved people of African descent bravely rejected their condition and fled to gain freedom elsewhere. This steady stream of fugitives motivated white authorities to c...

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Charleston’s Half-Moon Battery, 1694–1768

Charleston’s Half-Moon Battery, 1694–1768

August 13, 2021

The Half-Moon Battery is a historic structure in urban Charleston that formed part of the town’s earliest fortifications. Construction of its curving brick wall commenced in the mid-1690s, and the structure was completed and armed in 1702. Its can...

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Maroons, Picnics, Parades, and Porgy

Maroons, Picnics, Parades, and Porgy

July 23, 2021

Summertime brings easy living to many Lowcountry residents—a time to shed the constraints of modern life and enjoy the great outdoors at a nearby retreat. Long before the convenience of modern automobiles and recreational vehicles, the people of e...

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South Carolina’s First Public Lending Library in 1698

South Carolina’s First Public Lending Library in 1698

July 16, 2021

A bronze plaque on the west side of St. Philip Street in urban Charleston informs pedestrians that the site of Memminger Elementary School once hosted “the first public lending library in the American colonies,” established in 1698. This phrase ha...

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The Star-Spangled Spirit of Charleston

The Star-Spangled Spirit of Charleston

July 2, 2021

The “Star-Spangled Banner” became our national anthem in 1931, but its history in the Palmetto City goes back much farther. The words were written in Maryland in 1814, while the tune, composed in London during the 1770s, came to South Carolina dec...

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The Moving Memorials to Elizabeth Jackson

The Moving Memorials to Elizabeth Jackson

June 25, 2021

Two granite memorials in urban Charleston recall the story of Elizabeth Jackson, an obscure Irish immigrant who passed the final years of her life in South Carolina. She died in or near the Palmetto City during the American Revolution, but the sit...

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The Public Life of Charleston’s Market Hall

The Public Life of Charleston’s Market Hall

June 18, 2021

The temple-like structure standing at the intersection of Market and Meeting Streets in Charleston, with its yellow-wash walls and massive white columns is a familiar sight to many residents and visitors. Now 180 years old, the life story of this ...

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