Maroons, Picnics, Parades, and Porgy

Maroons, Picnics, Parades, and Porgy

July 23, 2021

Summertime brings easy living to many Lowcountry residents—a time to shed the constraints of modern life and enjoy the great outdoors at a nearby retreat. Long before the convenience of modern automobiles and recreational vehicles, the people of e...

Read more

South Carolina’s First Public Lending Library in 1698

South Carolina’s First Public Lending Library in 1698

July 16, 2021

A bronze plaque on the west side of St. Philip Street in urban Charleston informs pedestrians that the site of Memminger Elementary School once hosted “the first public lending library in the American colonies,” established in 1698. This phrase ha...

Read more

The Star-Spangled Spirit of Charleston

The Star-Spangled Spirit of Charleston

July 2, 2021

The “Star-Spangled Banner” became our national anthem in 1931, but its history in the Palmetto City goes back much farther. The words were written in Maryland in 1814, while the tune, composed in London during the 1770s, came to South Carolina dec...

Read more

The Moving Memorials to Elizabeth Jackson

The Moving Memorials to Elizabeth Jackson

June 25, 2021

Two granite memorials in urban Charleston recall the story of Elizabeth Jackson, an obscure Irish immigrant who passed the final years of her life in South Carolina. She died in or near the Palmetto City during the American Revolution, but the sit...

Read more

The Public Life of Charleston’s Market Hall

The Public Life of Charleston’s Market Hall

June 18, 2021

The temple-like structure standing at the intersection of Market and Meeting Streets in Charleston, with its yellow-wash walls and massive white columns is a familiar sight to many residents and visitors. Now 180 years old, the life story of this ...

Read more

Charleston’s Daily Bread: Regulating Retail Loaves from 1750 to 1858

Charleston’s Daily Bread: Regulating Retail Loaves from 1750 to 1858

June 11, 2021

You don’t have to be a foodie to recognize that bread has formed a significant part of Lowcountry foodways for centuries. While conversations about this delicious heritage often focus on recipes and ingredients, an interesting but obscure chapter ...

Read more

Parishes, Districts, and Counties in Early South Carolina

Parishes, Districts, and Counties in Early South Carolina

June 4, 2021

Scattered across coastal South Carolina, one finds a variety of saints’ names applied to numerous landmarks, institutions, and roads. Think, for example, of St. John’s High School on John’s Island, St. Andrew’s Boulevard west of the Ashley River, ...

Read more

Passenger Trains between Charleston and Summerville, from the Best Friend to BRT

Passenger Trains between Charleston and Summerville, from the Best Friend to BRT

May 21, 2021

Automotive congestion is a fact of life on Lowcountry roads in the twenty-first century, while transportation alternatives struggle to gain traction in our community. Mass transit solutions, while popular in larger urban centers, appear to be cont...

Read more

The Forgotten Dead: Charleston’s Public Cemeteries, 1794–2021

The Forgotten Dead: Charleston’s Public Cemeteries, 1794–2021

May 7, 2021

The steady growth of Charleston’s population in the generations after the American Revolution required municipal authorities to provide a succession of public burial grounds for its poorest citizens, transient visitors, and enslaved people of Afri...

Read more

The Forgotten Dead: Charleston

The Forgotten Dead: Charleston's Public Cemeteries, 1672–1794

April 30, 2021

Graveyards fascinate some people, while inspiring morbid dread in others. Like them or not, cemeteries are an important part of our shared landscape that merit respect and protection. Some burial grounds are more visible or better remembered than ...

Read more

Pages