The First People of the South Carolina Lowcountry

The First People of the South Carolina Lowcountry

November 19, 2021

The Lowcountry of South Carolina once belonged to more than a dozen distinct groups of Native Americans whose existence is now barely remembered. In the decades after the founding of Charleston in 1670, the indigenous people of this area interacte...

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Wielding the Sword of State in Early South Carolina

Wielding the Sword of State in Early South Carolina

November 5, 2021

For more than three centuries, the government of South Carolina has used a ceremonial sword to represent the state’s military strength and civil authority. Held aloft and brandished before crowds of citizens, this distinctive blade has played an i...

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Reviving Apparently Dead Bodies in 1790s Charleston

Reviving Apparently Dead Bodies in 1790s Charleston

October 29, 2021

In the late summer of 1793, the City of Charleston ratified an ordinance requiring the proprietors of pubs and barrooms to assist physicians attempting to revive the bodies of “apparently dead” persons lingering in a state of “suspended animation....

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Educating Antebellum Tradesmen: The Charleston Apprentices’ Library Society

Educating Antebellum Tradesmen: The Charleston Apprentices’ Library Society

October 21, 2021

In the middle of the nineteenth century, a remarkable Charleston organization sought to enhance the education and careers of local youths by creating a new kind of library. The Apprentices’ Library Society, founded in 1824, provided reading materi...

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Anglo-Spanish Hostility in Early South Carolina, 1670–1748

Anglo-Spanish Hostility in Early South Carolina, 1670–1748

October 1, 2021

Rival claims to the land of South Carolina sparked hostility between England and Spain that shaped the first seventy-eight years of the colony’s existence. While officials in Charleston considered the inhabitants of La Florida to be jealous rivals...

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The Roots of Spain’s Claim to South Carolina, 1513–1670

The Roots of Spain’s Claim to South Carolina, 1513–1670

September 24, 2021

The history of South Carolina, like any other chronological narrative, is more than just a list of important events and famous personalities. Our history is a complicated matrix informed by the experiences of numerous people with different and oft...

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Murder and Manhunt in 1820: Albro’s Flight from Slavery, Part 3

Murder and Manhunt in 1820: Albro’s Flight from Slavery, Part 3

September 10, 2021

Following his violent capture in Christ Church Parish, the African fugitive Albro was committed to jail in Charleston with a former friend and an infamous pair of convicted White criminals. Days later he returned to the village of Mount Pleasant f...

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Murder and Manhunt in 1820: Albro’s Flight from Slavery, Part 2

Murder and Manhunt in 1820: Albro’s Flight from Slavery, Part 2

September 3, 2021

Following Albro’s fatal encounter with a young White man on Dewees Island, the African fled through the waters of Copahee Sound and across several mainland plantations to evade detection. Meanwhile, the victim’s father traveled to Charleston to al...

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Murder and Manhunt in 1820: Albro’s Flight from Slavery, Part 1

Murder and Manhunt in 1820: Albro’s Flight from Slavery, Part 1

August 27, 2021

When an enslaved African man named Albro asserted his freedom and fled from the Isle of Palms in 1819, the laws of South Carolina marked him as a criminal fugitive. Spied and then pursued by white men on Dewees Island one night in early 1820, Albr...

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Escaping Slavery: Resistance on the Run

Escaping Slavery: Resistance on the Run

August 20, 2021

Slavery was legal in South Carolina until 1865, during which time thousands of enslaved people of African descent bravely rejected their condition and fled to gain freedom elsewhere. This steady stream of fugitives motivated white authorities to c...

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