Escaping Slavery in Early South Carolina

When: Saturday, February 22nd 2020, 11 a.m. - 12 noon.

Where: Baxter-Patrick James Island Library, 1858 South Grimball Road, 29412

Tens of thousands of Africans were brought to early South Carolina to work as enslaved laborers, but a small percentage of those people managed to find a path to freedom long before the abolition of slavery in 1865. Join CCPL's historian, Dr. Nic Butler, for an exploration of various ways and means of escaping slavery, with examples of specific men and women who found freedom in early South Carolina.

 

Hunting Beasts of Prey in Colonial South Carolina

When: Thursday, March 5th 2020, 5:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m.

Where: Edisto Island Library, 1589 Highway 174, 29438

In the early decades of this colony, the South Carolina legislature offered a cash bounty to encourage the hunting of "beasts of prey" that threatened the lives of settlers and slaves. Which animals were hunted to extirpation, and who benefited from the bounty? Join CCPL’s historian, Dr. Nic Butler, for a look at a forgotten, wild episode in the Lowcountry's natural history.

 

Islam and Enslaved Africans in Early Charleston

When: Thursday, March 12th 2020, 6 p.m. - 7 p.m.

Where: Main Library Auditorium, 68 Calhoun Street, 29401

In advance of the 2020 Spoleto USA premiere of the opera Omar, about an enslaved African man, Omar ibn Said, and his Islamic identity, panelists will discuss the Charleston intersection of faith and slavery manifest in his compelling story. Join CCPL's historian, Dr. Nic Butler, and scholar of Islam, Dr. Hussein Rashid, with moderator Brenda Tindal from the International African American Museum, for a stimulating conversation about slavery in Charleston and the presence of the African Muslims in the early United States.

 

Charleston Suffragists: Remembering Why They Fought

When: Tuesday, March 24th 2020, 6 p.m. - 7 p.m.

Where: Main Library Auditorium, 68 Calhoun Street, 29401

The year 2020 marks the centenary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment, a moment that marked the culmination of a decades-long campaign to extend the right to vote to women. While many histories of this achievement emphasize the personalities and tactics involved the long political struggle, it's easy to forget the many reasons why women sought to vote. John CCPL's historian, Dr. Nic Butler, for a look at the suffragists of early twentieth century Charleston and the various issues that motivated their work.

 

The Horn Work: Charleston's Tabby Fortress

When: Tuesday, March 31st 2020, 6 p.m. - 7 p.m.

Where: Main Library Auditorium, 68 Calhoun Street, 29401

What’s the story behind that slab of rock standing in Marion Square? It was once part of the massive “Horn Work” fortification that served as the town gate and the centerpiece of Charleston’s defenses during the British siege of 1780. Join CCPL's historian, Dr. Nic Butler, for an illustrated history of the Horn Work from its construction in 1757 through its demolition in 1784.