Slave Auction Sites in Colonial Charleston

When: Thursday, August 29th 2019, 6 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.

Where: Main Library Auditorium, 68 Calhoun Street, 29401

The public auction of enslaved people of African descent once formed a significant part of Charleston's economy and its landscape. During the city's first century of existence, most of these outdoor sales were concentrated within a relatively narrow compass of urban sites along the city's waterfront, but the specific locations are now obscure. Join CCPL's historian, Dr. Nic Butler, for an overview of the geography of the two branches of this human traffic--the sale of African captives arriving aboard trans-Atlantic ships, and the re-sale of people who already lived in the Lowcountry.

 

Immigration to South Carolina, 1670-1912: A Brief History

When: Sunday, September 15th 2019, 2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

Where: Main Library Auditorium, 68 Calhoun Street, 29401

Beginning as an English colony in 1670, South Carolina soon became the new home of diverse peoples streaming across the Atlantic Ocean from multiple nations and continents. Join CCPL’s historian, Dr. Nic Butler, for an overview of the various waves of immigrants who came through the port of Charleston to populate this state, from the first English settlers and African captives to the failure of the state's only Immigration Station in 1912.

 

The Spanish Claim to South Carolina, 1670-1763

Spanish explorers in the 1500s claimed and briefly occupied the land that in 1670 became the southern part of the English colony of Carolina. Spain's persistent claim to this land overshadowed a century of hostile relations between the two nations in Europe and between English colonists in the South Carolina Lowcountry and their Spanish neighbors in Florida. Join CCPL's historian, Dr. Nic Butler, for an overview of the competing colonial land claims, which were settled in 1763, and the lasting effect of this dispute on the Hispanic heritage of Charleston and the Lowcountry.

Three performances

  • Thursday, September 26th 2019, 6 p.m. - 7 p.m., Main Library Auditorium, 68 Calhoun Street, 29401
  • Monday, Septmber 30th 2019, 6 p.m. - 7 p.m., Mount Pleasant Regional Library, 1133 Mathis Ferry Road, 29464
  • Thursday, October 10th 2019, 6 p.m. - 7 p.m., Dorchester Road Regional Library, 6325 Dorchester Road, 29418

 

Indigo in the Fabric of Early South Carolina

When: Saturday, October 26th 2019, 12 noon - 1 p.m.

Where: Edgar Allen Poe Library, 1921 I'On Avenue, Sullivan's Island, 29482.

Indigo plants, prized for the vibrant blue dye they yield, formed an important part of South Carolina’s agricultural economy during our colonial era. Many historians point to Eliza Lucas Pinckney as the figure most responsible for introducing indigo to the Lowcountry around 1740, but the efforts of her contemporaries, and the broader economic context of her work, have received far less attention in recent years. John CCPL’s historian, Dr. Nic Butler, for an illustrated overview of the historical context of indigo’s rise and fall in early South Carolina.

 

The Forgotten Public Cemeteries of Peninsular Charleston

When: Tuesday, October 29th 2019, 6 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.

Where: Main Library Auditorium, 68 Calhoun Street, 29401

From the 1680s to the 1920s, deceased poor and enslaved people in urban Charleston were routinely interred within a series of publicly-owned cemeteries, the locations  of which crept northward up the peninsula over successive generations. As each of these public burying grounds became filled, municipal authorities sold the land to be developed for other uses. Join CCPL's historian, Dr. Nic Butler, for an overview of these forgotten cemeteries and their enduring presence within the landscape of modern Charleston.